Build Mobile Websites and Apps for Smart Devices – #bookreview

Build Mobile Websites and Apps for Smart Devices
By Earle Castledine, Myles Eftos & Max Wheeler
(SitePoint, $39.95, paperback; $27.99, Kindle)

By 2013, in some estimates, mobile devices such as smartphones and “other browser-equipped phones” will outnumber the world’s 1.78 billion PCs.

Meanwhile, the “mobile share of overall web browsing” is now growing rapidly. And: “We’re never going to spend less time on our phones and other mobile devices than we do now,” contend the authors of Build Mobile Websites and Apps for Smart Devices.

“Inevitiably, more powerful mobile devices and ubiquitous internet access will become the norm. And the context in which those devices are used will change rapidly. The likelihood of our potential customers being on mobile devices is higher and higher. We ignore the mobile web at our peril.”

The authors’ new guidebook from SharePoint is aimed at front-end web designers and developers, with emphasis on mobile websites and apps that are accessed via touch-screen smartphones.

Their well-illustrated, 256-page book is written in a smooth, accessible style that moves quickly to the point of  each chapter and example. They recommend that you read the chapters in sequence the first time, rather than skipping around, particularly if you are new to mobile web design and web development.

The chapter line-up gives a good look at the book’s structure and coverage:

  •  Preface
  • Chapter 1: Introduction to Mobile Web Design
  • Chapter 2: Design for Mobile
  • Chapter 3: Markup for Mobile
  • Chapter 4: Mobile Web Apps
  • Chapter 5: Using Device Features from Web Apps
  • Chapter 6: Polishing Up Our App
  • Chapter 7: Introducting PhoneGap
  • Chapter 8: Making Our Application Native
  • Appendix A: Running a Server for Testing

The book includes a link to “a downloadable ZIP archive that contains every line of example source code printed in this book.” And the writers emphasize that readers should have “intermediate knowledge” of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. They skip the absolute basics and move right into “what’s relevant for the mobile context.” 

They emphasize that “[t]he inevitable decision when designing for the mobile space is the choice between building a native application or a web application….A web application is one that’s accessed on the Web via the device’s browser–a website that offers app-like functionality, in other words.” Meanwhile, “[a] so-called native application is built specifically for a given platform–Android or iOS, for example–and is installed on the device much like a desktop application.”

They contend that “native apps offer a superior experience when compared to web applications,” and they note that “the difference is even more pronounced on slower devices.” However, building a native application can leave you vulnerable to market fragmentation and unsure which platforms you should target. Meanwhile,  it can be cheaper and faster to develop a Web application. So several important design and business decisions have to be made before you offer a new app to the marketplace. 

Build Mobile Websites and Apps for Smart Devices focuses first on making design decisions, selecting a feature set and using HTML, CSS and JavaScript to build a Web application. Later, it shows how to use PhoneGap to turn a web app into a native app for iOS, Android, BlackBerry and other platforms.

In the authors’ view, “mobile design is about context, but it’s also about speed. We’re aiming to give our users what they want, as fast as possible.” And, in many cases, “[p]roviding a version of our site to mobile users is going to be important regardless of whether or not we have a native application.”

In other words, be ready and able to go native and web when creating mobile websites and apps for smart devices

Si Dunn

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