Programming Perl, 4th Ed. – The long-awaited update has arrived – #bookreview #programming #in #perl

Programming Perl, 4th Edition
By Tom Christiansen, brian d foy and Larry Wall, with Jon Orwant
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $54.99)

Since 1991, Programming Perl has been considered both the Bible of Perl and the go-to reference guide for those who use this popular “mixed heritage” programming language.

Publication of this newly updated edition is good news for the legions of programmers who use Perl every day or are in the process of learning it.

Programming Perl last was updated 12 years ago, just when Perl v5.6 was being released. The current Perl release is v5.14, and, as the authors note, “Perl v5.16 is coming out soon.” This 4th edition focuses on v5.14 and its major new features and improvements. But it also previews features that will be offered in v5.16.

The new edition (1130 pages) has several new chapters for Perl programmers, and a few now-out-of-date chapters and experiments have been removed. Among the updates are “greatly improved” Unicode support, “even better” regular expressions, and more emphasis on CPAN (the Comprehensive Perl Archive Network), to highlight just a few.

This is not a guide for programmers planning to tinker Perl 6. The authors contend: “Perl 6 is really a ‘kid sister’ language to Perl 5, and not just a major update to Perl 5 that version numbers have trained you to expect. This book isn’t about that other language. It’s still about Perl 5, the version that most people in the world (even the Perl 6 folks) are still using quite productively.”

Perl was “[i]nitially designed as a glue language for Unix,” they add. So there is a distinct Unix bias even at the “Hello World” level in this book, and this may leave some Windows-centric beginners lost, puzzled and turning to the web for basic tips on how to program in Perl on Windows machines.

Perl novices, in fact, should not start just with this book but add it once they know they plan to stick with Perl programming. The authors recommend beginning first with Learning Perl by Randal Schwartz, brian d foy, and Tom Phoenix. They also provide an extensive list of other documents and resources for beginning, intermediate and expert Perl programmers.

Nonetheless, the authors states that “Perl is an easy language to learn and use, and we hope to convince you that we’re right. One thing that’s easy about Perl is that you don’t have to say much before you say what you want to say.”

Easy to learn, yes. But there’s also a lot to learn, as this well-written, hefty book shows and illustrates.

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir available soon in paperback. He is the author of a detective novel, Erwin’s Law, a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

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