Mobile JavaScript Application Development – Bringing the Web to Mobile Devices – #programming #bookreview

Mobile JavaScript Application Development
Adrian Kosmaczewski
(O’Reilly,
paperback, list price $24.99; Kindle edition, list price $19.99)

In the author’s view, “the most important moment in recent technological history was the introduction of the iPhone in January 2007. The impressive growths of iOS, Android, and other platforms [have] completely transformed the landscape of software engineering, while at the same time opening new possibilities for companies.”

Indeed, Adrian Kosmaczewski notes: “It is estimated that, in 2015, more than 50% of all web requests will come from mobile devices!”

So, if you are, or are planning to be,  a JavaScript programmer, you better know how to develop and support apps for mobile devices. And you’d better stay aware of “platform fragmentation” – the various platforms that you may encounter as old and new ones battle for survival and market dominance.

Kosmaczewski’s new, 145-page book is aimed at web developers who have some familiarity with HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript.

“It does not matter if you have mobile software engineering experience,” he assures potential readers. But: “Mobile applications are a world of their own, and they present challenges that common applications don’t deal with.…” These include:

  • Small screen sizes
  • Reduced Battery Life
  • Little Memory and disk specifications
  • Rapidly changing network conditions

His book is divided into seven well-written chapters. And six of them offer numerous screenshots and short code examples. The chapters are:

  1. HTML5 for Mobile Applications
  2. JavaScript Productivity Tips
  3. jQuery Mobile
  4. Sencha Touch
  5. Phone Gap
  6. Debugging and Testing
  7. Conclusion

Mobile JavaScript Application Development takes this straightforward approach: (1) “leave the theory to others” and (2) focus on “understand by doing.” And, mercifully, the author does not try to tackle too many technologies at once. Instead, he concentrates – in “an opinionated, hands-on” way on three technologies that he says “are currently the most promising and…show the most interesting roadmap.”

These are, as previously mentioned in the chapter list, jQuery Mobile, Sencha Touch, and PhoneGap. His goal is to help you determine which one is best for your project. (If you don’t agree with his choices, he provides helpful links to several others but does not discuss them.)

To work with the book’s code samples, certain items are needed and not easily summed up here in a few words, because of platform fragmentation and other factors. But the requirements can be viewed easily, using Amazon’s “Click to Look Inside!” feature for both the paperback and Kindle editions.

If your job or ambitions include developing apps for smartphones, you should check out this book.

Si Dunn

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