Ubuntu Made Easy – A simple, well-guided way to try Linux without installing it – #bookreview

Ubuntu Made Easy: A Project-Based Introduction to Linux
Rickford Grant, with Phil Bull
(No Starch Press
, paperbackKindle)

Curious about Linux? (Many of us are.) Wondering if you should put it on one of your PCs and venture out into a different realm that some of our geek friends constantly tell us is “better” (or even “vastly better”) than Windows?

The Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise Pangolin) CD that is packaged with this book “lets you both try Ubuntu without installing it and install Ubuntu to your hard drive once you’re ready,” the writers note. “It’s called a live CD. You can boot your computer from the CD and run Ubuntu directly off the CD without touching your hard disk to see if you like Ubuntu and to make sure that Ubuntu will work with your hardware. If, after running the live CD, you like what you see and everything seems to work, you can install Ubuntu on your computer using the same disc.”

During the installation process, you can choose to install Ubuntu to run within Windows (with slightly limited functionality), using the Wubi installer. Or you can take the full plunge and install Ubuntu outside of Windows. You can put it in a separate partition and create a Windows-Linux dual-boot setup. Or you can replace Windows with Linux, after carefully backing up all of your important data.

Ubuntu Made Easy: A Project-Based Introduction to Linux offers plenty of clear how-to information, screen shots, and step-by-step tips in its 22 chapters and four appendices. One detailed chapter covers how to fix common problems that may be encountered. The book’s cover is goofy, but the contents are solid.

The projects in this book primarily are exercises that help you put your new Linux and Ubuntu knowledge to work. You will learn, the authors state, how to “configure and customize your Ubuntu system.” And the book is organized “so that, as much as possible, you won’t be asked to do something that you haven’t already learned.”

Specifically, the projects range from (1) setting up printers, scanners, flash drives and other devices so they work with Linux, to(2) creating documents, spreadsheets, and presentations with the office-related applications, to (3) installing and playing free games and editing and sharing digital videos and photographs, to (4) using or staying away from the Linux command line.

Ubuntu Made Easy is not a book that will appeal to “seasoned geeks or power users” with Linux experience, the authors concede. But it does take a lot of the mystery out of what “running Linux” actually means.

The book and Ubuntu CD can make it simple and affordable for many computer users to see what much of the hype and hoopla over Linux is all about — and then decide, from first-hand experience, if they want to join in or not.

Si Dunn

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