JavaScript as Compilation Target: ClojureScript and Dart – #programming #bookreview

Despite its widespread success, JavaScript has a reputation for being a computer language with many flaws. Still, it is now everywhere on the planet, so it is here to stay, very likely for a long, long time.

Not surprisingly, several new languages have emerged that jump over some of JavaScript’s hurdles, offer improved capabilities, and also compile to optimized JavaScript code.

Two of these languages are the focus of noteworthy new “Up and Running” books from O’Reilly: ClojureScript: Up and Running and Dart: Up and Running.

Here are short reviews of each book:

ClojureScript: Up and Running
Stuart Sierra and Luke VanderHart
(O’Reilly, paperback, Kindle)

ClojureScript, the authors contend, “provides developers with a language that is more powerful than JavaScript, which can reach all the same places JavaScript can, with fewer of JavaScript’s shortcomings.”

The primary targets of ClojureScript are “web browser applications, but it is also applicable to any environment where JavaScript is the only programmable technology available,” they add.

“ClojureScript is more than Clojure syntax layered on top of JavaScript: it supports the full semantics of the Clojure language, including immutable data structures, lazy sequences, first-class functions, and macros,” they emphasize.

Their 100-page book focuses on how to use ClojureScript’s features, starting at the “Hello world” level and gradually advancing to “Development Process and Workflow” and “Integrating with Clojure.” (ClojureScript is designed for building client-side applications, but it can be merged with Clojure on the JVM to create client-server applications.)

Early in the book, they also describe how to compile a ClojureScript file to JavaScript and emit code “that is fully compatible with the Advanced Optimizations mode of the Google Closure Compiler.”

The two writers are Clojure/ClojureScript developers with a previous book to their credit.

ClojureScript: Up and Running is written well and appropriately illustrated with code samples, flow charts, and other diagrams. The authors recommend using the Leiningen build system for Clojure, plus the lein-cljsbuild plug-in for ClojureScript.

Their book is a smooth introduction to ClojureScript that requires no prior knowledge of Clojure. But you do need a basic working knowledge of JavaScript, HTML, CSS, and the Document Object Model (DOM).

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Dart: Up and Running
Kathy Walrath and Seth Ladd
(O’Reilly, paperback, Kindle)

Google created Dart to be “an open-source, batteries-included developer platform for building structured HTML5 web apps,” the two authors note.

Dart provides not only a new language, but libraries, an editor, a virtual machine (VM), a browser that can run Dart apps natively, and a compiler to JavaScript.”

Indeed, Dart looks very similar to JavaScript and is “easy to learn,” the two writers state. “A wide range of developers can learn Dart quickly. It’s an object-oriented language with classes, single inheritance, lexical scope, top-level functions, and a familiar syntax. Most developers are up and running with Dart in just a few hours.”

The authors work at Google and note that some of the software engineers who helped develop the V8 JavaScript engine that is “responsible for much of Chrome’s speed” are now “working on the Dart project.”

Dart has been designed to scale from simple scripts all the way up to complex apps, and it can run on both the client and the server.

Those who choose to code with Dart are urged to download the open-source Dart Editor tool, because it also comes with a “Dart-to-JavaScript compiler and a version of Chromium (nicknamed Dartium) that includes the Dart VM.”

Since Dart is new, the writers also urge readers to keep an eye periodically on the Dart website and on their book’s GitHub site, where code can be downloaded and errors and corrections noted.

Dart: Up and Running is a well-structured, well-written how-to book, nicely fortified with short code examples and other illustrations. While the book appears very approachable and simple, it is not for complete beginners. You should have a basic working knowledge of JavaScript, HTML, CSS, and the Document Object Model (DOM).

If you are looking for a web development language that matches JavaScript’s dynamic nature but also addresses JavaScript’s sometimes-aggravating shortcomings, consider trying Dart—with this book in hand.

Si Dunn

Adobe Edge Animate: The Missing Manual – #bookreview

Adobe Edge Animate: The Missing Manual
Chris Grover
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

Chris Grover’s well-written and updated new book shows you how to build animated HTML 5 graphics for the iPhone, the iPad, and the Web, using familiar Adobe features. By the sixth page of the first chapter, you are using the software to begin creating your first animation.

The previous edition of this book, covering Adobe Edge Animate Preview 7, was released just two months ago, shortly before Adobe released the 1.0 commercial version of its Edge Animate product. This new edition has been updated and expanded to cover the commercial version.

Prior to the 1.0 release, seven Preview versions of Adobe Edge Animate had been issued as free downloads, and user feedback was gathered so the product could be enhanced and expanded.

Here is what I reported about this book’s Preview 7 edition in an  October, 2012, review:

First, this book can help you get started with the 1.0 commercial version of Adobe Edge Animate. Second, O’Reilly will soon bring out an Adobe Edge Animate “Missing Manual” that covers the new commercial release. And, third, sources at O’Reilly tell me that readers who purchase this Preview 7 edition of Chris Grover’s book will get access to “the e-book version of Adobe Edge Animate the 1.0 version and all of its updates.”

The new edition of Adobe Edge Animate: The Missing Manual has ten chapters organized into five parts, even though page xiv of the paperback version states that the book is “divided into three parts.” (It then lists four parts, instead of  five, or three).  The new part in this edition is titled “Publishing Animate Compositions” and focuses on “Publishing Responsive Web Pages” that will look good “in web browsers of all shapes and sizes….” Here are the new edition’s parts and chapters:

Part One:Working with the Stage

  • Chapter 1: Introducing Adobe Edge Animate
  • Chapter 2: Creating and Animating Art
  • Chapter 3: Adding and Formatting Text

Part Two: Animation with Edge Animate

  • Chapter 4: Learning Timeline and Transition Techniques
  • Chapter 5: Triggering Actions
  • Chapter 6: Working Smart with Symbols

Part Three: Edge Animate with HTML 5 and JavaScript

  • Chapter 7: Working with Basic HTML and CSS
  • Chapter 8: Controlling Your Animations with JavaScript and jQuery
  • Chapter 9: Helpful JavaScript Tricks

Part Four: Publishing Your Composition

  • Chapter 10: Publishing Responsive Web Pages

Part Five: Appendixes

  • Appendix A: Installation and Help
  • Appendix B: Menu by Menu

Where keystrokes are appropriate, Chris Grover lists both and does not make you have to translate between systems, as some how-to manuals do.

“Animate works almost precisely the same in its Macintosh and Windows versions,” he assures. “Every button in every dialog box is exactly the same; the software response to ever command is identical. In this book, the illustrations have been given even-handed treatment, rotating between the two operating systems where Animate is at home (Windows 7 and Mac OS X).”

Si Dunn

For more information: (O’Reilly, paperback, Kindle)

Spring Data: Modern Data Access for Enterprise Java – #java #bookreview

Spring Data: Modern Data Access for Enterprise Java
Mark Pollack, Oliver Gierke, Thomas Risberg, Jonathan L. Brisbin and Michael Hunger
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

Big Data keeps getting wider and deeper by the second. And so do the demands for analyzing and profiting from all of those piled-up terabytes.

Meanwhile, the once whiz-bang technology known as the relational database is having a very hard time keeping pace. The sheer amount of data that companies now gather, store, access, and analyze is pushing traditional relational databases to the breaking point.

Many Java developers who are trying to keep these overloaded systems held together with baling wire, also are starting to learn to work with some of the “alternative data stores that are being used in mission-critical enterprise applications,” the authors of Spring Data point out.

A lot of data now is being stored elsewhere and not in relational databases. Yet companies cannot abandon what they have already gathered and invested heavily to access. So they need to keep using and supporting their relational databases, plus some newer, faster, more voracious solutions lumped under the heading “NoSQL databases,” (even though you can query them).

In “the new data access landscape,” the authors note: “there is a revolution taking place, which for data geeks is quite exciting. Relational databases are not dead; they are still central to the operations of many enterprises and will remain so for quite some time. The trends, though, are very clear: new data access technologies are solving problems that traditional relational databases can’t, so we need to broaden our skill set as developers and have a foot in both camps.”

They add: “The Spring Framework has a long history of simplifying the development of Java applications, in particular for writing RDBMS-based data access layers that use Java database connectivity (JDBC) or object-relational mappers.”

Their new book “is intended to give you a hands-on introduction to the Spring Data project, whose core mission is to enable Java developers to use state-of-the-art data processing and manipulation tools but also use traditional databases in a state-of-the-art manner.”

They have organized their 288-page book into six parts and 14 chapters:

Part I – Background

  • Chapter 1 – The Spring Data Project
  • Chapter 2 – Repositories: Convenient Data Access Layers
  • Chapter 3 – Type-Safe Querying Using Querydsl

Part II – Relational Databases

  • Chapter 4 – JPA Repositories
  • Chapter 5 – Type-safe JDBC Programming with Querydsl SQL

Part III – NoSQL

  • Chapter 6 – MongoDB: A Document Store
  • Chapter 7 – Neo4j: A Graph Database
  • Chapter8 – Redis: A Key/Value Store

Part IV – Rapid Application Development

  • Chapter 9 – Persistence Layers with Spring Roo
  • Chapter 10 – REST Repository Exporter

Part V – Big Data

  • Chapter 11 – Spring for Apache Hadoop
  • Chapter 12 – Analyzing Data with Hadoop
  • Chapter 13 – Creating Big Data Pipelines with Spring Batch and Spring Integration

Part 5 – Data Grids

  • Chapter 14 – GemFire: A Distributed Data Grid

“Many of the values that have made Spring the preferred platform for enterprise Java developers deliver particular benefit in a world of fragmented persistence solutions,” states Ron Johnson, creator of Spring Framework. Writing in the book’s foreword, he notes: “Part of the value of Spring is how it brings consistency (without descending to a lowest common denominator) in its approach to different technologies with which it integrates.

“A distinct ‘Spring way’ helps shorten the learning curve for developers and simplifies code maintenance. If you are already familiar with Spring, you will find that Spring Data eases your exploration and adoption of unfamiliar stores. If you aren’t already familiar with Spring, this is a good opportunity to see how Spring can simplify your code and make it more consistent.”

Spring Data definitely is not light reading, but it is well-written, and provides a good blending of procedures, steps, explanations, code samples, screenshots and other illustrations.

Si Dunn

Bruce Barnbaum’s ‘Tone Poems’ – Beautiful photographs, with music – #bookreview

Bruce Barnbaum is a superb black-and-white photographer, and Rocky Nook, Inc., recently has brought forth new editions of two of his beautifully crafted image collections.

Styled as part of a four-volume series, these two coffee-table books should appeal to almost anyone who loves good visual images and good music and appreciates opportunities to enjoy them together.

The two books, originally published by Photographic Arts Editions, are:

Tone Poems – Book 1, Opuses 1, 2 & 3
Bruce Barnbaum
(Rocky Nook, hardback)

Tone Poems – Book 2, Opuses 4, 5 & 6
Bruce Barnbaum
(Rocky Nook, hardback)

“It was the land, specifically the magnificent landscape of the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, that initially drew me into photography,” Barnbaum writes, in a Tone Poems chapter titled “Opus 3, Lyricism of the Land.” Almost 40 years later, he is “still drawn to that landscape, but filled with ideas about photography—and about the land—that I never dreamed of having back in my younger days.” Barnbaum also is drawn to the landscapes of many other parts of the world and is keenly aware of their frailties, as well as the increasing threats that human activity and commercial development pose to their natural beauty.

Why two photography books that also have commentary about the compositions and CDs of music intended to be played as accompaniment to the stunning images?

“Sometimes, even the combination of words and pictures are insufficient to adequately convey my feelings,” Barnbaum notes. “Music, added to the mix, helps convey it much more strongly.”

The CDs included with these books feature selections of classical music played by noted pianist Judith Cohen, artistic director of the Governor’s Chamber Music Series in the state of Washington.

“The music and the images are meant to celebrate the life, the light and the poetic lyricism of the land,” Barnbaum emphasizes.

The two books succeed in reaching these lofty goals.

– Si Dunn

Programming C# 5.0 – Excellent how-to guide for experienced developers ready to learn C# – #bookreview

Programming C# 5.0
Ian Griffiths
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

Ian Griffiths’ new book is for “experienced developers,” not for beginners hoping to learn the basics of programming while also learning C#. The focus is “Building Windows 8, Web, and Desktop Applications for the .NET 4.5 Framework.”

Earlier editions in the Programming C# series have “explained some basic concepts such as classes, polymorphism, and collections,” Griffiths notes. But C# also keeps growing in power and size, which means the page counts of its how-to manuals must keep growing, too, to cover “everything.”

The paperback version of Programming C# 5.0 weighs in at 861 pages and more than three pounds. So Griffiths’ choice to sharpen the book’s focus is a smart one. Beginners can learn the basics of programming in other books and other ways before digging into this edition. And experienced developers will find that the author’s explanations and code examples now have space to go “into rather more detail” than would have been possible if chapters explaining the basics of programming had been packed in, as well.

If you have done some programming and know a class from an array, this book can be your well-structured guide to learning C#. The “basics” are gone, but you still are shown how to create a “Hello World” program—primarily so you can see how new C# projects are created in Visual Studio, Microsoft’s development environment.

C# has been around since 2000 and “can be used for many kinds of applications, including websites, desktop applications, games, phone apps, and command-line utilities,” Griffiths says.

“The most significant new feature in C# 5.0,” he emphasizes, “is support for asynchronous programming.” He notes that “.NET has always offered asynchronous APIs (i.e., ones that do not wait for the operation they perform to finish before returning). Asynchrony is particularly important with input/output(I/O) operations, which can take a long time and often don’t require any active involvement from the CPU except at the start and end of an operation. Simple, synchronous APIs that do not return until the operation completes can be inefficient. They tie up a thread while waiting, which can cause suboptimal performance in servers, and they’re also unhelpful in client-side code, where they can make a user interface unresponsive.”

In the past, however, “the more efficient and flexible asynchronous APIs” have been “considerably harder to use than their synchronous counterparts. But now,” Griffiths points out, “if an asynchronous API conforms to a certain pattern, you can write C# code that looks almost as simple as the synchronous alternative would.”

If you are an experienced programmer hoping to add C# to your language skills, Ian Griffiths’ new book covers much of what you need to know, including how to use XAML (pronounced “zammel”) “to create  applications of the [touch-screen] style introduced by Windows 8” but also applications for desktop computers and Windows Phone.

Yes, Microsoft created C#, but there are other ways to run it, too, Griffiths adds.

“The open source Mono project (http://www.mono-project.com/) provides tools for building C# applications that run on Linux, Mac OS X, iOS, and Android.”

Si Dunn

For more information:  paperback – Kindle

iPhone: The Missing Manual, 6th Edition – Covers all iPhone models with iOS 6 software – #bookreview

iPhone: The Missing Manual, 6th Edition
David Pogue
(O’Reilly, paperback, Kindle)

 

This latest “Missing Manual” from David Pogue covers all iPhone models that have iOS 6 software, including iPhone 5.

The 538-page book is well-written, well-organized, and heavily illustrated with color photographs, illustrations, and screen shots. It also has numerous tips set off in yellow boxes for extra emphasis.

The 6th Edition’s chapters are gathered into five parts:

  • The iPhone as Phone – Focuses on “everything related to phone calls” with the iPhone.
  • Pix, Flix & Apps – “[D]edicated to the iPhone’s built-in software programs, with a special emphasis on its multimedia abilities…also app management….”
  • The iPhone Online – Includes “email, Web browsing, and tethering (that is, letting your phone serve as a sort of Internet antenna for your laptop).”
  • Connections – “…the world beyond the iPhone itself—like the copy of iTunes on your Mac or PC that can fill up the iPhone with music, videos, and photos, and syncing the calendar, address book, and mail settings.” Also covers the iPhone’s control panel, the Settings Program, and other features.
  • Appendixes – Appendix A covers the iPhone setup process; Appendix B looks at accessories such as chargers, car adapters, and carrying cases; Appendix C is a “master compendium of troubleshooting, maintenance, and battery information.”

The new iOS 6 software is available free, Pogue says, and is “the same operating system that runs on the iPad and the iPod Touch.”

He adds: “Why is that important? Because you can run iOS 6 on older iPhone models (the 3GS, 4, and 4S) without having to buy a new phone.” His new book “covers all phones that can run the iOS 6 software: the iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, and iPhone 5.”

Si Dunn

For more information: paperback, Kindle

LEGO Bonanza — Stack ‘em up: 3 hot new books for LEGO builders – #bookreview

No Starch Press recently has released three new books aimed at the world’s millions of LEGO™ builders:

  • The Unofficial LEGO™ Builder’s Guide, 2nd Edition
  • The LEGO™ Adventure Book, Vol. 1
  • The Unofficial LEGO™ Technic Builder’s Guide.

Here are short reviews of each.

The Unofficial LEGO™ Builder’s Guide, 2nd Edition
Allan Bedford
(No Starch,
paperbackKindle)

Allan Bedford’s popular how-to guide has been updated, and all photographs and illustrations are now in color.

The well-written 221-page book starts at the absolute beginner’s level, showing and explaining the various LEGO pieces, which range from “bricks” to “plates” to “slopes” to “tiles” and numerous others. From there, it shows the best ways to connect pieces for successful construction.  Then it delves into three different, progressively larger, sizes of LEGO constructions –minifig, miniland, and jumbo – before briefly going smaller, to microscale.

Bedford explains how to design and build structures and characters from LEGO elements and also shows how to put together several projects, including a train station, a space shuttle, a mosaic, a game board, and a sculpture of the Sphinx.

His book’s Appendix A offers a helpful “Brickopedia” that contains “a selection of more than 275 elements, from basic bricks, slopes, and plates, to specialized elements, arches, and even decorative elements.

The pieces included represent the most common and most reusable elements in the LEGO system,” Bedford notes. The parts’ specifications are given, and helpful notes are included, as well.

Appendix B, meanwhile, shows how to download and use design grids to plan complex LEGO projects before you build them.

The LEGO™ Adventure Book, Vol. 1
Megan Rothrock
(No Starch, hardback 
- Kindle)

Megan Rothrock’s book is the debut volume in the new “The LEGO™ Adventure Book series” from No Starch Press.

Subtitled “Cars, Castles, Dinosaurs & More!”, Volume 1 presents excellent color photographs of nearly 200 intriguing models crafted by LEGO builders around the world. Ms. Rothrock’s 200-page book also features “brick-by-brick breakdowns” of 25 models that range from a medieval village to T. Rex and a British Railways steam engine.

The constructions are shown step by step in close-up, so even inexperienced builders can duplicate them. Some are simple, such as a small bridge “that can be added to any scene” in eight steps. And others are more involved, such as a mecha named “Counterblast” that is well-armed with big guns that requires more than 50 steps to complete.

Megan Rothrock is well-known in LEGO builder circles. She is a former set designer for the LEGO Group, and her models have been widely displayed, including at ComicCon and LEGO events in Europe. She is now a freelance toy designer in Denmark.

LEGO builders frequently claim that they can build models of “almost anything” with LEGO parts. With books such as The LEGO™ Adventure Book, Vol. 1 helping guide and train you, you definitely can learn to build lots of different types of models.

The Unofficial LEGO™ Technic Builder’s Guide
Paweł “Sariel” Kmieć
(No Starch, paperbackKindle)

The LEGO™ Technic system lets you build LEGO models that move. The system includes motors, gears, pneumatics, pulleys, linkages, and other devices designed for LEGO constructions. But working with Technic can be complex at times.

Fortunately, Paweł “Sariel” Kmieć has excellent credentials for showing and explaining how to construct Technic models and make them operate. He is described as “YouTube’s most popular LEGO Technic builder, a guest blogger for the official LEGO Technic blog, and a 2012 LEGO Ambassador.”

His 333-page book is packed with illustrations, photographs, explanations, and tips on everything from simple “pins” (which “keep bricks and beams together”) to wheeled suspension systems and using a subtractor to get better steering of a tracked LEGO vehicle that has two motors and is radio-controlled.

While most of the focus is on details of how to use specifics Technic parts, he also shows some amazing and inspiring powered models that he has built from LEGO pieces and LEGO Technic devices.

Whether you are new to Technic or an old hand, you likely will want to build many things that move, once you have this book. 

Si Dunn

WordPress: The Missing Manual – Covers what you need to know & can profit from – #bookreview

WordPress: The Missing Manual
Matthew MacDonald
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

It’s easy to set up and launch a basic WordPress blog. But once you do, it’s also very easy to just keep blogging and ignore the many other options and features that WordPress offers. (I’m guilty of that, which is why I’m happy to see this book.)

If you want to know more about how to use WordPress or how to improve the appearance of an existing blog, WordPress: The Missing Manual definitely should be in your hands.  Matthew MacDonald’s new book is well-written, heavily illustrated, and packed with good how-to steps and tips.

Many small businesses and numerous large companies also use WordPress to provide some or all of their web presence. MacDonald’s 545-page how-guide has essential information for these users, too.

The book is organized into five parts:

  • Part One: Starting Out with WordPress – Covers key decisions you should make before starting to use WordPress.
  • Part Two: Building a WordPress Blog – The blogging-on-WordPress basics are presented here. But: “Even if you’re planning something more exotic than JAWB (Just Another WordPress Blog, don’t skip this section,” the author urges. “The key skills you’ll learn here also underpin custom sites, like the kind you’ll learn to build in Part Four of the book.”
  • Part Three: Supercharging Your Blog – Explains how to use plug-ins to add new features to your self-hosted blog site. Shows “how to put video, music, and photo galleries on any WordPress site. Covers “how to collaborate with a whole group of authors…and how to attract boatloads of web visitors….”
  • Part Four: From Blog to Website – Shows how to “take your WordPress skills beyond the blog and learn to craft a custom website” with WordPress at its heart.
  • Part Five: Appendices – Appendix A “explains how to take a website you created on a free WordPress.com hosting service and move it to another web host to get more features.” Appendix B, meanwhile, gathers up the “useful web links” scattered throughout the book and puts them into one place organized by chapter. A link also is provided where this collection of links can be downloaded.

How popular is WordPress? It is, according to MacDonald, “ridiculously popular…stunningly popular…responsible for roughly one-sixth of the world’s websites….And one out of every five new sites runs on WordPress….”

If you choose to go the WordPress route, be sure you have WordPress: The Missing Manual with you.

Si Dunn

QuickBooks 2013: The Missing Manual – Updated and now it’s ‘Official’ – #bookreview

QuickBooks 2013: The Missing Manual
By Bonnie Biafore
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

Bonnie Biafore’s latest version of her popular “Missing Manual” QuickBooks how-to guide has gained a significant endorsement. It’s now labeled “The Official Intuit Guide” to QuickBooks 2013.

Once again, the updated guidebook provides clear, well-illustrated, step-by-step instructions on how to use the Windows edition of QuickBooks 2013, the most popular version of Intuit’s product, particularly in small businesses.

The 736-page book also gives some basic how-to information and advice on bookkeeping and  accounting – enough to get you past some confusing stumbling blocks as you set up a business and its accounts, but not enough that you should try to skip legal advice and focused training.

“QuickBooks isn’t hard to learn,” the author emphasizes. “Many of the features that you’re familiar with from other programs work just the same way in QuickBooks—windows, dialog boxes, drop-down lists, and keyboard shortcuts, to name a few. And with each new version, Intuit has added enhancements and new features to make your workflow smoother and faster. The challenge is knowing what to do according to accounting rules, and how to do it in QuickBooks.”

The 2013 edition of QuickBooks, she points out, “sports a brand-new look that simplifies the interface, removes clutter, and presents features and options in a much more organized and consistent way.” Her book also describes several features that are new in the 2013 release.

Three words of caution: First, this book does not cover non-USA versions of QuickBooks 2013. Second, the Pro and Premier editions of the software cannot handle more than 14,500 unique inventory items or 14,500 contact names.  And third, the author points out, “QuickBooks for Mac differs significantly from the Windows version, so this book isn’t meant to be a guide to the Mac version of the program.”

There are many different versions of the QuickBooks 2013 software. But this “Missing Manual” puts most of its focus on QuickBooks 2013 Pro, “because its balance of features and price make it the most popular edition.” However, the author also provides “notes about features offered in the Premier edition, which is one step up from Pro.”

For many of us in small business, a QuickBooks “Missing Manual”  is  the best QuickBooks how-to guide, period. And Intuit’s new “Official Guide” stamp of approval should help seal the deal for others seeking the best QuickBooks reference.

The new edition of Bonnie Biafore’s book is divided into five parts containing a total of 26 chapters and two appendices.

Part One covers “Getting Started.” It starts with “Creating a Company File” and “Getting Around in QuickBooks” and advances to setting up accounts, customers, jobs, vendors, items, lists, and managing QuickBooks files.

Part Two’s focus is “Bookkeeping,” and its chapters covers everything from tracking time and mileage to paying for expenses, invoicing, managing accounts receivable, generating financial statements and performing end-of-year tasks.

“Managing Your Business” is the focus of Part Three. These chapters cover managing inventory, budgeting and planning, and working with reports.

“QuickBooks Power” is the title of Part Four. It covers using QuickBooks with online banking services, configuring preferences in QuickBooks to fit your company, integrating QuickBooks with other programs, customizing QuickBooks, and keeping your QuickBooks data secure.

Part Five contains two appendices: “Installing QuickBooks” and “Help, Support, and Other Resources.”

As usual, this “Missing Manual” does not contain a CD, but it does provide a link where “every single Web address, practice file, and piece of downloadable software mentioned In this book is available….”

QuickBooks 2013: The Missing Manual can help you get a small business set up and off the ground while you are learning the program.  But if you don’t have a reasonably good background in bookkeeping and accounting, do not try to rely on the software alone to save you. Get competent help from a consultant and legal advice from someone besides your rich Uncle Bob. And get some training any way you can, as soon as you can.

Then, once you can afford it, hire good people to help you with  your bookkeeping and accounting, while you focus on the bigger picture, growing your business with the help of QuickBooks 2013’s budgeting, planning, forecast, report, contact synchronization, lead tracking, and to-do list features.

One other caution: QuickBooks has a specialized edition specifically for nonprofit organizations. It is more expensive than the Pro package. So some people try to save money and use the Pro package to manage a small nonprofit. But there can be confusions involving some of the terminology, transactions and reports. And there may not be workarounds for some situations. You may be better off buying the QuickBooks Nonprofit edition.

By the way, QuickBooks 2013: The Missing Manual can be used to learn features in earlier versions of QuickBooks. Of course, doing so and seeing what’s missing may convince you to upgrade. And the 2013 screens will appear somewhat different from what you see. If you have an older version of QuickBooks and don’t plan to upgrade soon, consider looking online for one of the earlier editions of this book.

Si Dunn

Panobook 2012: Award-Winning Panoramic Photographs – #bookreview

Panobook 2012: Award-Winning Panoramic Photographs
The Kolor Team
(Rocky Nook, hardback)

Beautiful.There are few other words to describe this gathering of 150 prize-winning panoramic color photographs.

The photographs were judged as the best of the 1,647 entries in the Panobook 2012 competition sponsored by Kolor, developer of Autopano image-stitching software. The software enables individual images shot with conventional digital cameras to be stitched together to create expansive panoramic photographs. 

Professional and amateur photographers all over the world submitted photos for the competition.  And, in the words of the book’s editors, the results included “[s]ublime landscapes, original compositions, artistic and technical performances …exceptional images that invite you on a unique journey around the world.”

The stunning shots range from the interior of a basilica in Krakow, Poland, to an idyllic landscape in West Virginia, to an amazing tangle of trees in New Zealand, as well as elegant city skylines, landscapes, shorelines, building interiors, and even panoramic underwater photographs.

Almost anyone who likes photography and pursues it as a profession or hobby will find many inspiring and engrossing pictures in this collection.

Si Dunn