Cloudera Administration Handbook – How to become an effective Big Data administrator of large Hadoop clusters – #bookreview

 

 

Cloudera Administration Handbook

 Rohit Menon

Packt PublishingKindle, paperback

 

The explosive growth and use of Big Data in business, government, science and other arenas has fueled a strong demand for new Hadoop administrators. The administrators’ key duty is to set up and maintain Hadoop clusters that help process and analyze massive amounts of information.

New Hadoop administrators and those looking to join their ranks especially will want to give good consideration to The Cloudera Administration Handbook by Rohit Menon. This is a well-organized, well-written and solidly illustrated guide to building and maintaining large Apache Hadoop clusters using Cloudera Manager and CDH5.

The author has an extensive computer science background and is a Cloudera Certified Apache Hadoop Developer. He notes that “Cloudera Inc., is a Palo Alto-based American enterprise software company that provides Apache Hadoop-based software, support and services, and training to data-driven enterprises. It is often referred to as the commercial Hadoop company.”

CDH, Menon points out, is the easy shorthand name for a rather awkward software title: “Cloudera’s Distribution Including Apache Hadoop.” CDH is “an enterprise-level distribution including Apache Hadoop and several components of its ecosystem such as Apache Hive, Apache Avro, HBase, and many more. CDH is 100 percent open source,” Menon writes.

The Cloudera Manager, meanwhile, “is a web-browser-based administration tool to manage Apache Hadoop clusters. It is the centralized command center to operate the entire cluster from a single interface. Using Cloudera Manager, the administrator gets visibility for each and every component in the cluster.”

The Cloudera Manager is not explored until nearly halfway into the book, and some may wish it had been explained sooner, since they may be trying to learn it on day one of their new job. However, Menon wants readers first to become familiar with “all the steps and operations needed to set up a cluster via the command line” at a terminal. And these are, of course, important considerations to becoming an effective, knowledgeable and versatile Hadoop Administrator.  (You may not always have access to Cloudera Manager while setting up or troubleshooting a cluster.)

The book’s nine chapters show its well-focused range:

  • Chapter 1: Getting Started with Apache Hadoop
  • Chapter 2: HDFS and MapReduce
  • Chapter 3: Cloudera’s Distribution Including Apache Hadoop
  • Chapter 4: Exploring HDFS Federation and Its High Availability
  • Chapter 5: Using Cloudera Manager
  • Chapter 6: Implementing Security Using Kerberos
  • Chapter 7: Managing an Apache Hadoop Cluster
  • Chapter 8: Cluster Monitoring Using Events and Alerts
  • Chapter 9: Configuring Backups

You will have to bring some hardware and software experience and skills to the table, of course. Apache Hadoop primarily is run on Linux. “So having good Linux skills such as monitoring, troubleshooting, configuration, and security is a must” for a Hadoop administrator, Menon points out. Another requirement is being able to work comfortably with the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) and understand Java exceptions.

But those skills and his Cloudera Administration Handbook can take you from “the very basics of Hadoop” to taking up “the responsibilities of a Hadoop administrator and…managing huge Hadoop clusters.”

Si Dunn

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The Sun is God – Adrian McKinty takes readers well off the beaten path with this new historical mystery – #bookreview

 

The Sun is God

Adrian McKinty

Seventh Street Books - Kindle, paperback

Take a weird but true exotic setting. Throw in some real people and real murders. Add to the mix a fictional investigator: Will Prior, an ex-military police lieutenant who deliberately got himself cashiered from the British army during the Boer War following a deadly clash with African prisoners. Wrap it all up with a (very) surprising ending.

The Sun is God, Adrian McKinty’s new historical mystery, likely will please and amaze many readers. Trying to track down a murderer in a 1906 German nudist colony off the coast of New Guinea is a stunning and challenging departure from his Detective Sean Duffy trilogy set in the urban battles and enormous tensions of Northern Ireland in the 1980s.

McKinty is in fine form in this book as he offers up a complicated crime story set within a little-remembered slice of pre-World War I history: Part of New Guinea, north of Australia, was a German colony in the year 1906.

It is here that Will Prior is now living with his “servant girl,” Siwa, amid the colony’s failing banana, rubber and tea plantations.  While still willing to swear allegiance to the British Empire, Will now lives under German rule. So, when a German army officer, Captain Hauptmann Kessler, comes to his house one day, Will fears that it is to take back the money Germany previously loaned him to become a plantation owner. Instead, Will learns that the colony’s governor wants him, because of his past military police experience, to go with Captain Kessler to an island where some German nudists claim to have discovered the secret of immortality.

One of the immortals, unfortunately, has suddenly turned up quite dead. And while the nudists claim the victim died in his bed from malaria, an official autopsy in the capital of German New Guinea has revealed something quite different: the victim drowned and had bruise marks consistent with a struggle.

Things quickly get even more strange after Will and Kessler arrive and have to camp amid the nudists and share their dangerous diet while they attempt to find clues. There’s sex, yes, and drugs. (But the novel is set 50 years before Elvis Presley, so no rock ‘n’ roll.)  And, once danger erupts for the two investigators, they can’t call for backup, and they definitely can’t hide — not on a very small island that boats seldom visit, because it’s thought to be haunted.

Si Dunn

The Button Man – A fast-paced chase to find and stop an obsessed serial killer – #fiction #bookreview

 

The Button Man

A Hugo Marston Prequel

Mark Pryor

(Seventh Street Books - paperback, Kindle)

 

Fans of Mark Pryor’s investigator Hugo Marston will be delighted with this well-written and fast-paced new prequel to The Bookseller, the novel that started the Marston series. Likewise, The Button Man is an excellent place to start reading if you are seeking a new crime fighter to follow through the streets and countrysides of England and France.

The Button Man takes us back to Marston’s troubled early days as chief of security at the U.S. Embassy in London, before he became chief of security at the U.S. Embassy in Paris.

In both cities, Marston has a penchant for going “off the reservation,” so to speak, once he is on a case. Indeed, rather than hang around the embassy grounds, he willingly chases suspects through London, Paris and the English and French countrysides. And, as The Button Man shows, Marston often will ditch protocol, as well as jurisdiction, and risk working alone, free from the bureaucracies of British or French backup, as he moves in for the dangerous showdown.

In The Button Man, the ambassador assigns Marston to protect two well-known Americans while British police investigate them following a highly publicized hit-and-run fatality. But one of the Americans suddenly is found murdered, and the other gives Marston the slip and goes on the run.

When Marston, an ex-FBI profiler, goes after the fugitive, he doesn’t know that his pursuit is about to evolve into something much bigger than he expects. Helped along by secretive young woman with an odd name and by a pheasant-hunting member of the British parliament who’s big on law and order and tight budgets, Marston soon finds himself desperately trying to track down and stop someone different and decidedly more dangerous: an English serial killer who doesn’t agree that the way he murders his victims is a crime.

Si Dunn

Si Dunn’s books include Erwin’s Law and Dark Signals.

 

The Mob and the City: The Hidden History of How the Mafia Captured New York – #bookreview

The Mob and the City: The Hidden History of How the Mafia Captured New York

 

The Mob and the City

The Hidden History of How the Mafia Captured New York

C. Alexander Hortis

(Prometheus Books, Kindle, hardcover)

 

Forget The Godfather, its sequels and numerous other, famous “Mafia” movies. This excellent book cuts straight through the hype, fictions, and glamorizations to tell “the hidden history of how the street soldiers”–not the godfathers–“of the modern Mafia captured New York City during the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s.” And its author convincingly argues that “the key formative decade for the Mafia was actually the 1930s”–not “the Prohibition era of the 1920s” as numerous books and movies have had us believe. During the Great Depression-ravaged Thirties, the Sicilian mafiosi , the Cosa Nostra (“Our Thing”), rose to become New York’s top crime syndicate, with thousands of foot soldiers and associates eventually “entrenched throughout the economy, neighborhoods, and nightlife of New York.”

The Mob and the City is well-written and superbly researched. C. Alexander Hortis has dug deeply into available resources but also uncovered important new data sources, including previously secret files obtained via the Freedom of Information Act. Hortis presents a convincing case that there was (1) never really a “golden age of gangsters” in New York and (2) definitely not much honor among thieves. “The wiseguys,” he writes, “broke every one of their ‘rules,’ trafficked drugs almost from the beginning, became government informers, betrayed each other, lied, and cheated.” Hortis’s story of how New York City’s booming economy also offered the major crime syndicates “an embarrassment of riches” to exploit and plunder is fascinating and eye-opening reading.

Si Dunn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Well-Grounded Rubyist, 2nd Edition – A solid, well-written, updated guide to the Ruby programming language – #bookreview

 

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The Well-Grounded Rubyist

David A. Black

(Manning - paperback)

Ruby, predominately known as an object-oriented programming language, shows up frequently on lists of the top ten (or whatever) languages to know. And Ruby has long been paired with Rails to create the popular Ruby on Rails web application framework.

When the forerunner of this book appeared eight years ago, it was titled Ruby for Rails: Ruby Techniques for Rails Developers. And R4R, as it is sometimes known, was well received in both the Ruby and Rails camps.

In 2009, the R4R book was revised and retitled The Well-Grounded Rubyist. “This new edition is  a descendant of R4R but not exactly an update. It’s more of a repurposing,” the author, David A. Black, noted at the time. “The Well-Grounded Rubyist is a ‘just Ruby’ book, and it’s written to be read by anyone interested in Ruby.”

That focus continues in this second edition, which has been updated to cover Ruby 2.1. Ruby newcomers can get started and advance quickly with this fine “just Ruby” book in hand. Ruby veterans also can use it to gain new knowledge and sharpen familiar skills.

Black approaches the process of explaining Ruby “as a kind of widening spiral, building on the familiar but always opening out into the unknown.”

His well-written text does not try to be a “complete” language reference. Instead, reading The Well-Grounded Rubyist is like having a well-experienced and patient mentor close at hand–a mentor who willingly offers up clear examples and explanations. You likely will want to keep this book around as a go-to how-to reference long after you have learned and begun to work with Ruby.

It does help to have at least a little experience with programming before you tackle Ruby and this book. And, if you already have an older version of Ruby installed on your computer, upgrade it to 2.1.x. (As this review is being written, 2.1.2 is the current version.)

Yes, Ruby can be used in several different programming paradigms, including functional and imperative. But The Well-Grounded Rubyist is essentially all-object-oriented-all-the-time in its approach.

“Ruby is an object-oriented language, and the sooner you dive into how Ruby handles objects, the better,” Black states. “Accordingly, objects will serve both as a way to bootstrap the discussion of the language (and your knowledge of it) and as a golden thread leading us to further topics and techniques.”

Si Dunn

Grails in Action, 2nd Edition – A (mostly) winning how-to guide to use with a winning web app framework – #programming #bookreview

 

Grails in Action, Second Edition

Glen Smith and Peter Ledbrook

(Manning - paperback)

Grails finishes at or very near the top in almost any smackdown of full-stack web application frameworks that run on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). And this recently updated Grails in Action how-to book is mostly a clear winner, too.

According to the Grails.org website, open-source Grails “takes advantage of the Groovy programming language and convention over configuration to provide a productive and streamlined development experience.”

Grails likewise is a world that “moves very quickly,” the authors of Grails in Action, Second Edition emphasize. “There have been substantial changes in Grails in the time it took us to develop Grails in Action, Second Edition. Even moving from Grails 2.2 to 2.3 caused us to make significant changes! Although the book targets Grails 2.3, a new version of Grails (2.4) is already available. Fortunately, everything in here is still valid for the new version.”

In the first chapter, the authors try to move very quickly through the process of getting a Grails application up, running, tested and deployed. But in taking this “Grails in a hurry” approach, they race a bit too quickly and unclearly through the installation instructions, in my opinion. (My Linux and Windows installations did not work correctly at first, and I had to seek out  information on how to sort them out.)

And, in the portion of the chapter where you are told how to get the random-quote database set up and working, it is not always clear which file you are supposed to modify and in which subdirectory. I already had a little bit of experience with Groovy, so that portion went smoothly. But the Grails database steps could have been explained and illustrated more clearly. It took me several tries to finally get the “Quote of the Day” database working and posting random quotes.

The authors take a four-part approach to explaining Grails and its underlying Groovy programming language:

  • Part 1: Introducing Grails – You are shown how to get a nicely formatted Quote of the Day (QOTD) application up and running, while also learning how to work with Groovy.
  • Part 2: Core Grails – You get a “more thorough exploration of the three core parts of the Grails ecosystem: models,
    controllers, and views.” Includes such topics as: domain modeling; query mechanisms; how to query a database in Grails without using SQL; Grails’ web-oriented features; Grails Service objects; Grails’ tags for user interface construction; and Grails support for Ajax.
  • Part 3: Everyday Grails – The focus here is on “building all the necessary pieces of a real-world application.” The chapters cover tests, plug-ins, security in Grails and working with RESTful APIs. The chapters also cover (1) Grails single-page web apps using the Angular.js framework, and (2) Spring integration in Grails.
  • Part 4: Advanced Grails – These chapters zero in on “performance tuning, legacy integration, database transactions, custom build processes, and even how to develop and publish your own plugins.”

Aside from a few small omissions of how-to information, I am happy to have the wide-ranging contents of this book. And I am certainly pleased with what I can now do with Grails and Groovy, after reading Grails in Action, Second Edition.

 –Si Dunn

 

 

The Joy of Clojure – This fine 2nd edition makes learning a Lisp dialect fun (well, almost) – #bookreview

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The Joy of Clojure, 2nd Edition

Michael Fogus and Chris Houser

(Manning - paperback)

Several times, I had played with Clojure and considered learning it. But I kept deciding it looked too weird, required too many parentheses and put its operators in strange places. Furthermore, it has always ranked low on the assorted lists of currently “popular” programming languages.

So I moved on and put my focus elsewhere. Indeed, I ignored the first edition of this book. But I am now glad that I have had a chance to reconsider Clojure and to review this new edition from Manning.

The book by Michael Fogus and Chris Houser is intelligently and pleasantly written, and the authors do an excellent job of explaining (and “selling”) Clojure to skeptics like me. Compared with many other programming languages, Clojure is compact. And, it is focused primarily on functional and declarative programming. Also, it offers excellent support for concurrency (where several computations are performed during overlapping time periods rather than waiting for one-at-a-time sequences to complete).

Clojure looks weird because it is one of the several dialects of Lisp, which first appeared in 1958. But Clojure runs on the Java Virtual Machine and JavaScript runtimes. And, it is a functional programming language that has gained a good reputation for being fast and stable. Along with its built-in concurrency support, Clojure also offers the “predictable precision” of immutable and persistent data structures.

The Joy of Clojure is not a book for absolute beginners. Still, Clojure is very easy to install (I have it running on a Windows PC and a Linux PC). And the book’s code examples work well with Clojure’s Read-Eval-Print Loop (REPL).

I am still not convinced there is a lot of “joy” in learning one of the Lisp dialects. Yet, with this fine book as a guide, I am getting a better feel for Clojure and its excellent possibilities. (For example, its compactness and concurrency support likely will make it a lot more popular soon.) And I am enjoying the authors’ text and code examples, even though the latter still look strange as I key them in and modify them to get new results–or error messages.

Bottom line, I am pleased to recommend The Joy of Clojure to others who have been curious but resistant. Resistance is, after all, futile.

Si Dunn