Enemies at Home: A Flavia Albia Novel – A cool detective procedural set in ancient Rome – #mystery #bookreview

 

Lindsey Davis Enemies at Home

 

Enemies at Home

A Flavia Albia Novel

Lindsey Davis

 ( Minotaur Books, hardback, Kindle )

Can a 29-year-old widow make it as a private detective in first century A.D. Rome?

Flavia Albia has some friends in semi-high places. And she has one very important family connection: She is the adopted daughter of Marcus Didius Falco, one of Rome’s best-known “private informers,” the ancient equivalent of a modern private eye.

Flavia has taken over her father’s office, and she keeps needing new cases.  But in the private informer business, it’s “no win, no pay.” So,  she is always on the lookout for a case she can both win and profit from, in a legal system where women have no rights in matters of law and where she must compete with male private informers who do have rights.

Unfortunately, the case that suddenly lands in Flavia’s lap in Enemies at Home does not seem to hold much promise:

“Even before I started, I knew I should say no,” Flavia states at the book’s beginning.

“There are rules for private informers accepting a new case. Never take on clients who cannot pay you. Never do favors for friends. Don’t work with relatives, Think carefully about legal work. If, like me, you are a woman, keep clear of men you find attractive. The Aviola inquiry broke every one of those rules, not the least because the clients had no money, yet I took it on. Will I never learn?”

 Not yet. She meets up with a magistrate, an aedile, named Tiberius Manlius Faustus, with whom she has worked before and finds attractive. (Can “Manlius” be viewed as a Latinized pun on “manly”? Yep.) Faustus has just been assigned to deal with a very complicated case within his jurisdiction, and he needs Flavia’s help to try to sort things out.

A man and his wife have been brutally murdered and robbed, apparently by intruders, and the couples’ slaves have fled to the Temple of Ceres, desperately hoping to get asylum so they can save their lives.

“The slaves got wind of their plight,” Flavia informs us. “They knew the notorious Roman law when a head of household was murdered at home. By instinct the authorities went after the wife, but that was no use if she was dead too. So unless the dead man had another obvious enemy, his slaves fell under suspicion. Whether guilty or not, they were put to death. All of them.”

Flavia’s task, of course, is to attempt to help exonerate the slaves. But Roman law literally is a vicious beast, sometimes. Criminals and those merely suspected of a crime can be thrown to the lions or sewn into large bags along with dangerous animals and dropped into the sea. And that’s just two of the many ways capital punishment can be meted out in the Roman Empire.

Flavia is the slaves’ only hope. And she is armed with nothing but curiosity, questions and bluster, plus some occasional help from the aedile, Manlius Faustus, as she goes where no woman typically has gone before, at least in recent years, in Roman society.

Enemies at Home features a very big cast of characters (spanning two pages at the front of the book). And it is somewhat easy to grow confused by (and a bit wearied of) virtually every male name ending in “-us” and almost every female name ending in “-a.”

For the most part, however, this second Flavia Albia novel is fun and informative reading. Lindsey Davis is a master at moving her characters about in ancient Roman settings. She keeps them both human and limited by the pace, technology, laws and social mores of the Roman Empire (during the reign of the allegedly paranoid emperor, Domitian). Her dialogue often is wickedly sharp and funny, and, except for an occasional Latin word here and there, no effort is made to have the characters speak in any tongue other than modern lingo.

If you have been hoping Falco will reappear and have a cameo role in this new book, be prepared to wait for the next novel in the series and see if he shows up there. Flavia Albia is now her own woman. She emerges strongly from her father’s shadow in Enemies at Home and demonstrates why she also deserves to be known as one of the very best public informers in first-century Rome.

Si Dunn

Matzo Frogs – A hopping-good children’s book about acts of kindness – #bookreview #children’s books

Matzo Frogs

Sally Rosenthal (author) and David Sheldon (illustrations)

(NewSouth Books - hardcover)

Matzo Frogs is a fun tale, delightfully told and superbly illustrated. It tells and shows how one act of kindness can lead to another:  “Mitzvah goreret mitzvah.”

The book has been created for children and for parents of children who are still learning to read. But adults also need to be reminded about the special powers of kindness and working together. Matzo Frogs can help with that task, too.

Matzo Frogs tells the story of kind-hearted Minnie Feinsilver. Her favorite cousins are coming over for Shabbat dinner, and Minnie is up early, fixing matzo ball soup. Unfortunately, Minnie has an accident and spills the soup. And she doesn’t have time to prepare a new batch. She has promised to spend the day helping a friend who is bedridden with a broken leg. So she goes off to do that good deed.

Her next-door neighbors, a colony of frogs living in a pond, know what has happened to Minnie, and they decide to help, to do a mitzvah, by preparing a new batch of matzo soup in her kitchen.

David Sheldon’s artwork brings the cooking adventure to hilarious life as the frogs hop into action, opening the recipe book, gathering the special ingredients, making the matzo balls, cooking the soup and jumping back home just before Minnie returns home to her surprise.

Minnie realizes that while she was out helping her friend, someone else has helped her by saving her Shabbat dinner for her cousins. And, when she finally figures out who did the mitzvah, she thanks them in a kind and special way.

The book’s author, Sally Rosenthal, is an Emmy Award-winning documentary film producer. Matzo Frogs is her first book. The illustrator, David Sheldon, has created artwork for more than 80 children’s books.

By the way, if you are hungry for some matzo soup but don’t want to gather  up and cook the ingredients or wait for kind frogs to fix it for you, here’s a link to a well-known packaged mix.

Si Dunn

 

 

 

Ember.js in Action – An ambitious overview, with glitches – #programming #bookreview

Ember.js in Action

Joachim Haagen Skeie

(Manning - paperback)

 

The Ember.js JavaScript framework has “a steep learning curve,” Joachim Haagen Skeie cautions readers repeatedly in his new book.

Indeed, Ember does. I’ve watched that learning curve confuse and frustrate several experienced JavaScript and Ruby on Rails developers. And I’ve banged my own (thick) skull against the Ember.js framework several times while (1) trying to learn it from an assortment of books and websites, including emberjs.com, and (2) building a few basic apps.

Skeie’s new book is an ambitious overview of software that bills itself as “a framework for creating ambitious web applications.” And Skeie ambitiously does not start out with a lame “Hello, World!” example. Right in Chapter 1, you dive into building a real-world application for creating, editing, posting and deleting notes. ” The source code for the Notes application weighs in at about 200 lines of code and 130 lines of CSS, including the templates and JavaScript source code,” Skeie points out. “You should be able to develop and run this application on any Windows-, Mac-, or Linux-based platform using only a text editor.”

I got  the Notes app to (mostly) run on a Windows machine and a Linux machine. But I can’t get it to save the contents of notes, even though I downloaded the book’s code samples, and my code seems to match what the author highlights in his book. (Still trying to sort out the problem. Perhaps something is wrong in my setups?)

I hate writing mixed reviews. It takes enormous effort and thought to create and finish a book. And I have been looking and hoping for a solid how-to text on Ember. For me, however, this book has two key downsides. First, the code examples are written for Ember.js 1.0.0, and as this review is being written, Ember.js 1.5.1 is the latest release (with 1.6 in beta). Second, the book’s opening chapter is very difficult for beginners to follow.

Some other reviewers also have noticed problems with the book’s example code –which, for me, forms the heart of a good how-to book. And they have taken issue with how the code is presented in the text.

Still, there is much to like here, especially if you are experienced in JavaScript and in model-view-controller (MVC) frameworks and have been curious about Ember.js.

I am fairly new to Ember, so some of the chapters most helpful to me have included using Handlebars js, testing Ember.js applications and creating custom Ember.js components–areas not given much notice in the other Ember books I have read.

If you are new to JavaScript and to frameworks, do not attempt to dive into Ember.js in Action as your first Ember exposure. Start with the Ember.js website and some simpler books first. Then, consider this book.

Hopefully, in the next edition, the all-important opening chapter will be reworked, and the code examples will be presented in a clearer and more complete fashion.

Si Dunn

 

River of Angels – An excellent tale of two families and their divided city: Los Angeles – #fiction #bookreview

 

River of Angels

Alejandro Morales

(Arte Público Press, paperback )

 

This third novel by Alejandro Morales is a compelling, evocative portrait of  two very different families whose lives become intertwined through their children, in ways both loving and tragic.

Set in the 19th and 20th centuries, River of Angels is also the story of a burgeoning U.S. city divided by a dangerous river yet   linked by bridges and marriages, as well as shifting economic, cultural and racial balances.

Los Angeles today is divided by many ethnic, political and financial lines. And these divisions have been defined not only by major currents and undercurrents in California and American history but also by the river powerfully described in Morales’s book:  El Río de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Angeles de la Porciúncula, “The River of Our Lady the Queen of the Angels of Porciuncula.”

The completion of a bridge over that river in 1887 provided a more convenient way for people to cross from either side, the author makes clear. But the bridge also helped set discriminations into easier motion.

“Most of the Los Angeles residents and people in neighboring communities were soon enjoying the convenience the bridge offered,” Alejandro Morales writes. “Laborers who worked on the west side of the river used the bridge every day to return to their dwellings on the east side. On certain days and hours during the week, it seemed that only workers moved back and forth across the river. Mexicans, blacks and Chinese had settled in the center of the city around the old plaza. However, that was changing, and [after the bridge was built] there was a deliberate and obvious push to house Mexicans on the east side of the river. The City Council made it easier for Mexicans to buy property and build houses on the Eastside.”

Some years later, a savage storm and flooding washed away the first bridge, and two more were built. Meanwhile, as this tale of families makes clear, the growth of Los Angeles’ Anglo population continued to push and squeeze minority groups, including Mexicans, African-Americans, Chinese and Japanese, out of their homes and businesses and into other areas of the city.

“The residents of the original Mexican colonias in Los Angeles proper–near La Placita and other sections newly designated as Anglo-only–were evicted and forced to relocate to the immigrant quarters of Los Angeles that were thought of as Mexican reservations,” Morales writes. “The city’s Anglo population needed the Mexicans for labor. The Mexicans had to live near, but not among, the Anglo families.”

That segregation sets up major tensions and drama within this engrossing novel as two families from widely separate realms are forcibly pulled together.

River of Angels delivers a unique and vivid portrait of Los Angeles at some of its worst and best. At the same time, Alejandro Morales skillfully illuminates racial, cultural, political and economic tensions that can be found today in virtually any other American city, whether a river runs through it or not.

Si Dunn

Confessions of a Book Burner – A novelist and poet’s engrossing journey to find her creativity and strength – #bookreview

 

Confessions of a Book Burner

Lucha Corpi

 (Arte Público Press – paperback )

 

In the Mexican state of Vera Cruz, a school teacher who knew the Corpi family let little four-year-old Lucha come to class with her older brother and spend each day sitting quietly at the back of the room.

As Lucha watched and listened, she soon began learning how to read and write and also how, literally, to blend into backgrounds.

These skills later would serve her well at a pivotal moment in her adult life, when she suddenly found herself a divorced young mother living in a foreign country, the United States, with a young son to support  while surrounded by racial bias.

Confessions of a Book Burner is a well-written collection of personal essays and stories that reflect on Lucha Corpi’s journey to becoming a novelist, poet and teacher, and then, breaking out of her in-the-background comfort zone, becoming a San Francisco Bay-area activist for bilingual education, women’s rights, and civil rights.

“Throughout my life, no matter where I’ve lived, silence and melancholy have been my friends and allies,” she writes in her memoir. “They’ve aided the internalization of feeling and the introspection necessary to find the variety of incongruent elements in my conscious and subconscious mind that eventually come together to form [a] poem” or other written work.

“Teaching, writing and motherhood, all-consuming aspects of my life, hardly allowed me time to wallow in self-pity or regret,” she adds.

Lucha Corpi is now an internationally recognized novelist, poet, and author of children’s books. Among her works are four novels in the Gloria Damasco Mystery series, which she began after reading “many mystery novels as well as author interviews on the writing of crime fiction….”

She continues: “Every road taken in my search for the reason Chicanas do not write mysteries kept leading me back to the reading corner. Sin lectura no hay ni escritura e literatura–there is no literature without reading and writing.” Her informal surveys of Chicanas and Latinas convinced her that these readers turned away from mysteries because they don’t like stories about crime and guns and women as victims and seldom have read them.

To that, she writes: “I can…assure any Chicana who is now contemplating penning a mystery novel that the writing of crime fiction, when one respects one’s art, is as legitimate as any other kind of writing; that exposing the machinations of a ‘justice system’ which more often than not stacks the deck against women, especially women of color, is not only all right; it is also a way to obtaining justice  for those who won’t or can’t speak for themselves.”

Si Dunn

Scala for Java Developers – A practical guide to building apps and integrating code – #programming #bookreview

Scala for Java Developers

Build reactive, scalable applications and integrate Java code with the power of Scala

Thomas Alexandre

(Packtpaperback, Kindle)

 

The increasingly popular Scala programming language runs on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). And “Java and Scala stacks can be freely mixed for totally seamless integration,” Scala’s website proudly trumpets.

The Scala site goes on to note: “Scala is a modern multi-paradigm programming language designed to express common programming patterns in a concise, elegant, and type-safe way. It smoothly integrates features of object-oriented and functional languages.”

Indeed, in Scala, “every value is an object” and “every function is a value.”

Scala’s continuing  rise poses something of a dilemma for many Java developers. Their questions include:

  • Should I learn Scala and blend it with Java?
  • Should I take up Scala and use it instead of  Java?
  • Should I just keep my head down, ignore Scala, and focus on getting better at developing with Java?

Thomas Alexandre’s well-written new book, Scala for Java Developers, clearly is aimed at those who would much rather add Scala to their skills and resumes than attempt to hide from the changes Scala can offer to Java development.

He notes in his preface: “When I tell people around me that I now program in Scala rather than Java, I often get the question, ‘So, in simple words, what is the main advantage of using Scala compared to Java?’  I tend to respond with this: ‘With Scala, you reason and program closer to the domain, closer to plain English.’ “

However, Alexandre’s new how-to guide does not try to browbeat developers into abandoning Java and pledging allegiance to Scala alone. Instead, Alexandre shows how the two programming languages can be used together. And he demonstrates how Scala solutions often can be shorter and less complex than their Java equivalents.

He focuses on “exploring progressively some of the new concepts brought by Scala, in particular, how to unify the best of Object-Oriented and functional programming without giving away any of the established and mature technologies built around Java for the past fifteen years.”

Decisions regarding how far to go with Scala remain with the reader. Yet Alexandre and his numerous code examples make a compelling case for becoming at least reasonably familiar with the language and experiencing how easily it can integrate with Java.

And, yes, he does evangelize a bit; this is, after all, a book about Scala. “Scala is the only language that has it all,” Alexandre touts. “It is statically typed, runs on the JVM and is totally Java compatible, is both object-oriented and functional, and is
not verbose, thereby leading to better productivity, less maintenance, and therefore more fun.”

His book is divided into 10 chapters:

  • Chapter 1: Programming Interactively within Your Project – Includes advantages of using Scala, learning Scala via the REPL, and performing operations on collections.
  • Chapter 2: Code Integration – Focuses on creating a REST API from an existing database, adding a test in Scala, setting up Scala within a Java Maven project, and showing how Scala and Java work together despite some differences in code style.
  • Chapter 3: Understanding the Scala Ecosystem – Includes inheriting Java Integrated Development Environments (IDEs), building with Simple Build Tool (SBT), using Scala worksheets, working with HTTP, and using Typesafe Activator.
  • Chapter 4: Testing Tools – Writing tests with ScalaTest and testing with ScalaCheck.
  • Chapter 5: Getting Started with the Play Framework – Getting started with the classic Play distribution, getting started with the Typesafe Activator, the architecture of a Play application, authentication, and practical tips when using Play.
  • Chapter 6: Database Access and the Future of ORM – In this case, ORM is Object Relational Modeling. Chapter topics include integrating an existing ORM – Hibernate and JPA, dealing with persistence in the Play framework, replacing ORM, learning about Slick, and scaffolding a Play application.
  • Chapter 7: Working with Integration and Web Services – Includes binding XML data in Scala, working with XML and JSON, and handling Play requests with XML and JSON.
  • Chapter 8: Essential Properties of Modern Applications – Asynchrony and Concurrency – Covers the pillars of concurrency, the async library – SIP-22-Async, and getting started with Akka.
  • Chapter 9: Building Reactive Web Applications – Includes describing reactive applications, handling streams reactively, experimenting with WebSockets and Iteratees in Play, learning from activator templates, and playing with Actor Room.
  • Chapter 10: Scala Goodies – Covers exploring MongoDb and scratching the surface of Big Data. Also introduces DSLs in Scala and introduces Scala.js, which compiles Scala to JavaScript.

Alexandre makes a strong pitch for using the Play framework in Scala web development. And he again speaks out for Scala at the conclusion of his well-structured book:

“The concise and expressive syntax of the Scala language should make your code not only more readable but also more maintainable for yourself and other developers,” he writes. “You don’t have to give up any of the libraries of the very large and mature Java ecosystem as all the APIs can be reused directly within Scala. Moreover, you benefit from many additional great Scala-specific libraries. Our recommendation is to take a piece of Java code from a domain you understand well, maybe because you wrote it in the first place one or several times before. Then, try to convert it to Scala code and refactor it to get rid of the boilerplate and to make it in a more functional style.”

Si Dunn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CoffeeScript in Action – A pleasant, thorough, language-centered how-to guide – #programming #bookreview

 

CoffeeScript in Action

Patrick Lee

(Manning - paperback)

 

CoffeeScript compiles to JavaScript, that awkward, quirky mashup which remains–because of its central role in the World Wide Web–one of the world’s most heavily utilized programming languages.

When beginners first hear this about CoffeeScript, they often think: Ah, ha! I could learn that and skip having to learn JavaScript!

Nope. Sorry.

“CoffeeScript is not about avoiding JavaScript–it is about understanding JavaScript,” Patrick Lee writes in his comprehensive and pleasant new book, CoffeeScript in Action. “Learning CoffeeScript helps people to understand JavaScript.”

Lee notes: “CoffeeScript is a simple language, and there are two simple reasons for learning it. First, it fixes some problems in JavaScript that are unpleasant to work with. Second, understanding CoffeeScript will help you learn new ways of using JavaScript and new ways of programming in general.”

So, learn JavaScript and learn CoffeeScript. And, if you are hired to work with JavaScript, be very glad you took the time and effort to also learn CoffeeScript. It will come in handy.

CoffeeScript increasingly is being used to write complete applications. (Just one example: the CoffeeScript compiler used to be written in Ruby. Now it is implemented in CoffeeScript.) Likewise, CoffeeScript can work smoothly with Node.js and Ruby on Rails.

CoffeeScript is out there, and, increasingly, it is being put to work in the workaday world.

CoffeeScript in Action definitely lives up to its title. Lee’s book takes the reader from the foundations and basic building blocks of the language all the way to thoughts on the future of CoffeeScript as ECMAScript 5 and ECMAScript 6 keep bringing changes to JavaScript.

I have read and used several smaller books on CoffeeScript, including The Little Book on CoffeeScript and Jump Start CoffeeScript. These are good, and numerous other books are available. But if you want a reasonably deep understanding of CoffeeScript as a programming language, I recommend starting with, or moving up to, CoffeeScript in Action.

Patrick Lee says that his book “doesn’t try to comprehensively detail libraries, frameworks, or other ancillary matters. Instead, it concentrates only on teaching the CoffeeScript programming language from syntax, through composition, to building, testing, and deploying applications.”

The three-part, 13-chapter, 408-page (in print format) book offers dozens of short, concise code examples that illustrate such diverse aspects as objects, functions, mixins, tests, event loops, compiling, creating animations, using CoffeeScript with domain-specific languages, and deploying applications. The book also serves up some CoffeeScript cartoons, as well as practical illustrations for key points.

How long will JavaScript be around–and, with it, the impetus to learn CoffeeScript?

Lee contends that “you should count on it being around for a long time–long enough, at least, that it will probably outlast your career as a programmer.”

Si Dunn

 

The Nature of Truth – Sergio Troncoso’s intelligent thriller is now in paperback – #bookreview

The Nature of Truth

Sergio Troncoso

(Arte Público Press – paperback )

 

Yale graduate student Helmut Sanchez is a man unsure of who he really is.  He feels “neither American nor German nor Mexican.”

Indeed, as this absorbing, intelligent, world-wise thriller unfolds, Helmut is wrestling with a question “that had tormented him all his life,” Sergio Troncoso writes.

“Helmut Sanchez had always hoped his Mexican blood would save him from a free-fall into his German heritage. Yet certain parts of this heritage also captivated him, especially German philosophy and poetry. So instead of saving him outright, these mixed legacies confused him. He had never really felt at home with German culture, but in the many ways he harbored the same doubts about American culture.”

He is, in short, stuck with the vague feeling that he is “neither here nor there.”

Suddenly, amid his graduate school academic research, Helmut makes a startling discovery about one of his professors. It is a finding that unsettles both his life and his views even more. Soon afterward, when the professor is killed, Helmut finds himself drawn into a murder investigation where the borders between good and evil and right and wrong quickly get fluid and murky.

The Nature of Truth, first published in hardback in 2003 by Northwestern University Press, is now available for the first time in paperback, from the University of Houston’s Arte Público Press. Sergio Troncoso, who lives and works in New York City, has won numerous awards for his writing. He is now a resident faculty member of the Yale Writers’ Conference.

Troncoso’s previous books include Crossing Borders: Personal Essays, From This Wicked Patch of Dust, and The Last Tortilla and Other Stories.

Si Dunn

 

 

Mastering Gamification – A 30-day strategy to enhance customer engagement – #business #bookreview

 

Mastering Gamification

Customer Engagement in 30 Days

Scot Harris and Kevin O’Gorman

(Impackt Publishing – Kindle, paperback)

 Gamification is now a popular buzz word in many parts of the business world. This book wisely does not try to cover every angle, but stays focused on one application: “Marketing and sales people are using gamification to improve customer loyalty and engagement, knowing that it will lead to increased profitability,” the authors write.

They emphasize that “gamifying does not mean turning your business or website into a game. As Gamification.org defines it, gamifying is:

‘The presence or addition of game-like characteristics in anything
that has not been traditionally considered a game.’

 “Take particular note of the word ‘characteristics’ in this phrase,” the authors point out . “The purpose of gamifying is not to turn something into a game, but to apply understanding and knowledge about the basic human desires we all have that make us like games to a non-gaming environment, and hopefully to improve our businesses.”

 You may not finish all of the exercises, nor follow all of the suggestions in this well-written book. Yet the well-structured, 30-day plan offered by Harris and O’Gorman still can help you think harder about your business, how customers see it and how they engage–or don’t engage–with the products or services you offer.

 Even if you operate a small enterprise where you are the entire staff, this book can offer some good ideas and useful tips that can help you make more sales and keep customers coming back.

 What the authors aim to do is help you create and “launch a long-range, ongoing, continuous process of attracting the attention of a target audience, drawing them into a social space built around you and your products or services, encouraging them to evangelize about your products or services, and instilling in them an unshakable sense of loyalty.”

 In other words, you learn how to use some gamification techniques to get customers’ attention, keep their attention, and keep them coming back for more of whatever you are selling–three major keys to long-term survival and growth in business.

Si Dunn

Mule in Action, 2nd Edition – Want to be an integration developer? Here’s a good start – #bookreview

 

Mule in Action, Second Edition

David Dossot, John D’Emic, Victor Romero

(Manning – paperback)

 

An enterprise service bus (ESB) can help you link together many different types of platforms and applications–old and new–and keep them communicating and passing data between each other.

“Mule,” this book’s authors note, “is a lightweight, event-driven enterprise service bus and an integration platform and broker.  As such, it resembles more a rich and diverse toolbox than a shrink-wrapped application.”

Mule in Action, Second Edition, is a comprehensive and generally well-written overview of Mule 3 and how to put its open-source building blocks together to create integration solutions and develop them with Mule. The book provides very good focus on sending, receiving, routing, and transforming data, key aspects of an ESB.

More attention, however, could have been paid to clarity and detail in Chapter 1, the all-important chapter that helps Mule newcomers get started and enthused.

This second edition is a recent update of the 2009 first edition. Unfortunately, the Mule screens have changed a bit since the book’s screen shots were created for the new edition. Therefore, some of the how-to instructions and screen images do not match what the user now sees. This gets particularly confusing while trying to learn how to configure a JMS outbound endpoint for the first time, using Mule Studio’s graphical editor. The instructions seem insufficient, and the mismatch of screens can leave a beginner unsure how to proceed.

The same goes for configuring the message setting in the Logger element. The text instructs: “You’ll set the message attribute to print a String followed by the payload of the message, using the Mule Expression Language.” But no example is given. Fortunately, a reviewer on Amazon has posted a correct procedure. In his view, the message attribute should be: We received a message: #[message.payload]  –without any quote marks around it. (It works.)

Of course, this book is not really aimed at beginners–it’s for developers, architects, and managers (even though there will be Mule “beginners” in those ranks). Fortunately, it soon moves away from relying solely on Mule Studio’s graphical editor. The book’s examples, as the authors note, “mostly focus on the XML configurations of flows.” Thus, there are many XML code examples to work with, plus occasional screen shots of the flows as they appear in Mule Studio. And you can use other IDEs to work with the XML, if you prefer.

Indeed, the authors note, “no functionality in the CE version of Mule is dependent on Mule Studio.”

Overall, this is a very good book, and it definitely covers a lot of ground, from “discovering” Mule to becoming a Mule developer of integration applications, and using certain tools (such as business process management systems) to augment the applications you develop. I just wish a little more how-to clarity had been delivered in Chapter 1.

Si Dunn