Learning iOS Programming, 2nd Ed. – Updated to cover iOS 5, iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch – #programming #bookreview

Learning iOS Programming, 2nd Edition
By Alasdair Allan
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $34.99; Kindle edition, list price $27.99)

Alasdair Allan’s popular iOS programming book recently has been updated to cover iOS 5. And it has a new name. (The first edition was titled Learning iPhone Programming.)

“The changes made in this second edition reflect the fact that a lot has happened since the first edition was published: the release of the iPad, a major release of Xcode, two revisions of the operating system itself, and the arrival of Apple’s iCloud,” the author notes. “This book has therefore been refreshed, renewed, and updated to reflect these fairly fundamental changes to the platform, and all of the example code was rewritten from the ground up for Xcode 4 and iOS 5 using ARC.”

Allan’s book – well-written and appropriately illustrated – is structured to provide “a rapid introduction to programming for the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad,” and it assumes that you have some familiarity with C or a C-derived language, as well as a basic understanding of object-oriented programming.

And the pace is fast. By chapter 3, you are building the requisite “Hello, World” application and running it in iPhone Simulator.

In that same chapter, Allan also introduces the basic syntax of Objective-C and highlights some of the “rather strange” ways that it deals with method calls. He discusses how the Cocoa Touch framework underlying iOS applications “is based on one of the oldest design patterns, the Model-View-Controller pattern, which dates from the 1970s.” And he warns that “[a]ttempting to write iOS applications while ignoring the underlying MVC patterns is a pointless exercise in make-work.”

Learning iOS Programming, 2nd Edition does not emphasize web-based applications. It centers, instead, on creating native applications using Apple’s SDK. “The obvious reason to use the native SDK,” Allan states, “is to do things that you can’t do using web technologies. The first generation of augmented reality applications is a case in point; these needed close integration with the iPhone’s onboard sensors (e.g., GPS, accelerometer, digital compass, and camera) and wouldn’t have been possible without that access.”

He emphasizes a financial reason, as well. “Consumers won’t buy your application on their platform just because you support other platforms; instead they want an application that looks like the rest of the applications on their platform, that follows the same interface paradigms as the rest of the applications they’re used to, and is integrated into their platform.”

He adds: “If you integrate your application into the iOS ecosphere, make use of the possibilities that the hardware offers, and make sure your user interface is optimized for the device, the user experience is going to be much improved.”

Hard to argue with that.

Learning iOS Programming, 2nd Edition provides the steps necessary to develop and market your first iOS application. Allan notes: “Until recently, the only way to obtain the iOS SDK was to become a registered iOS developer. However, you can now download the current release of Xcode and the iOS SDK directly from the Mac App Store.”

Of course, if you intend to distribute your applications “or even just deploy them onto your own device, you will also need to register with Apple as a developer and then enroll in one of the developer programs.”

You may need some system upgrades, as well. To develop apps for the iOS, you’ll need an Intel Mac running OS X 10.6 (“Snow Leopard”) or later. If you plan to create apps that use Apple’s iCloud, you’ll need OS X 10.7 (“Lion”) or later.

One other recommendation from Allan: If you’re truly serious about being an iOS developer, consider also registering with the Mac Developer Program.

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir. He is the author of an e-book detective novel, Erwin’s Law, now also available in paperback, plus a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

Three new specialized how-to books for SharePoint, JQuery & Mac OS X Lion Server – #bookreview #in #programming

Here are three new books for those with at least some basic to intermediate experience with Microsoft SharePoint, or web development, or Mac OS X Lion.

Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Creating and Implementing Real-World Projects
By Jennifer Mason, Christian Buckley, Brian T. Jackett, and Wes Preston
(Microsoft Press,
paperback, list price $34.99; Kindle edition, list price $27.99)

If you have some background in Microsoft SharePoint and want to dig deeper, this book can help you learn how to use SharePoint to create real-world solutions to ten common business problems.

Each chapter is devoted to a single project, such as creating a FAQ system to help users quickly find answers to their questions, setting up a help desk solution to track service requests, or building a simple project management system.

The projects are based on “various scenarios encountered by the authors as we have used SharePoint as a tool to build solutions that address business needs….Each of the solutions has been implemented in one or more organization,” they state.

Do not jump into Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Creating and Implementing Real-World Projects until you have gained “a general understanding of the basics of SharePoint,” the authors caution. And note that SharePoint is not easily defined as one “type” of product.

If you keep in mind the process of building a house, they write, “SharePoint is like the various tools and materials, and the final business solutions you build are like the house. There are many features and tools in SharePoint, and within this book, you will see different ways to combine and structure them into business solutions.”

Their 403-page book is well written and cleanly organized with short paragraphs and many headings, step lists and illustrations. It also has an extensive index.

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JQuery: Novice to Ninja, 2nd Edition
By Earle Castledine and Craig Sharkie
(SitePoint,
paperback, list price $39.95; Kindle edition, list price $29.95)

Technology changes fast, and web developers curious about JQuery will welcome this updated edition of Earle Castledine’s and Craig Sharkie’s book that first appeared in 2010.

This also is not a book for beginners. “You should,” the authors note, “already have intermediate to advanced HTML and CSS skills, as JQuery uses CSS-style selectors to zero in on page elements. Some rudimentary programming knowledge will be helpful to have,” they add, “as JQuery—despite its clever abstractions—is still based on JavaScript.” 

The authors offer high praise for the power of JQuery: “Aside from being a joy to use, one of the biggest benefits of JQuery is that it handles a lot of infuriating cross-browser issues for you. Anyone who has written serious JavaScript in the past can attest that cross-browser inconsistencies will drive you mad.”

They describe how to download and include the latest version of JQuery in web pages. And their book is organized to introduce JQuery features and code examples while also showing you, step by step, how to build a complete working application.

JQuery: Novice to Ninja, 2nd Edition has plenty of illustrations and is well indexed and written in a friendly, approachable style. 

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Using Mac OS X Lion Server
By Charles Edge
(O’Reilly,
paperback, list price $29.99; Kindle edition, list price $23.99)

Yes, intermediate and advanced system administrators will find some useful information in this well-written and nicely illustrated guide.

“But the book,” says author Charles Edge, “is really meant for new system administrators: the owner of the small business, the busy parent trying to manage all of those iPhone and iPads the kids are running around with, the teacher with a classroom full of iMacs or iPads, and of course, the new podcaster, just looking for a place to host countless hours of talking about the topic of her choice.”

What Using Mac OS X Lion Server  does not cover is “managing a Lion Server from the command line, scripting client management, or other advanced topics.”

The topics it does cover include: Planning for and installing a server; sharing and backing up files; sharing address books, calendars, and iChat; Wikis, webs and blogs; building a mail server; building a podcasting server; managing Apple computers and iOS devices; network services; and deploying Mac OS X computers.

The author cautions: “In many ways, the traditional system administrator will find Lion challenging in its consumeristic approach. There is a lot of power under the hood, but the tools used to manage the server have been simplified so that anyone can manage it, not just veteran Unix gods.”

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir. He is the author of an e-book detective novel, Erwin’s Law, now also available in paperback, plus a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Lion Edition – #bookreview #in #mac #windows

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Lion Edition
By David Pogue
(O’Reilly,
paperback, list price $29.99; Kindle edition, list price $23.99)

I own and use three Windows PCs during a typical day. But sometimes (don’t ask why), I find myself forced – forced – to use my wife’s Macintosh.

Grrrr. Where do I click? Where are the other mouse buttons? And what do these geeky, alien icons actually mean?

Frankly, I’ve hated Macs for a long, long time. And I’ve especially hated the smug, “Everything’s simpler on a Mac!” attitude that peppy Mac users seem to radiate whenever they are around us gray-haired Windows types who  have been messing with command prompts, anti-virus software, and the Blue Screen of Death since (seemingly) the War of 1812.

That being said, I am a big fan of New York Times tech columnist David Pogue and “The Missing Manual” book series he created.  I use several of O’Reilly’s “Missing” manuals on a frequent basis.

Pogue’s new book is now proving useful for me as a sort of Klingon-to-English translation guide when I am forced – forced –to use my beloved’s dearly beloved Mac.

But in all seriousness, if you are contemplating making the switch or have already switched from Windows to Mac (traitor!), you need this book. It is a well-written, nicely illustrated user’s guide with a strong focus on how to transfer documents and other files from Windows machines to Macs. Often, the transfers go smoothly. “It turns out that communicating with a Windows PC is one of the Mac’s most polished talents,” Pogue notes.

Sometimes, however, the transfers do not go well. Pogue’s huge book (691 pages) also points out some potential pitfalls and remedies, such as possibly losing “memorized transactions, customized report designs, and reconciliations” when transferring from QuickBooks for Windows to QuickBooks to Mac.

Switching to the Mac is organized into five parts:

  • Part 1, Welcome to the Macintosh – Covers the essentials of “everything you see onscreen when you turn on the machine.”
  • Part 2, Making the Move – Covers “the actual process of hauling your software, settings, and even peripherals (like printers and monitors) across the chasm from the PC to the Mac.” Includes steps for running Windows on Macs, “an extremely attractive option.”
  • Part 3, Making Connections – Shows how to set up an Internet connection on a Mac and use Apple’s Internet software suite.
  • Part 4, Putting Down Roots – Gets into more advanced topics “to turn you into a Macintosh power user.”
  • Part 5, Appendixes – Two of the four appendixes cover installation and troubleshooting. One is the “Where’d It Go?” Dictionary for those trying to find familiar Windows controls “in the new, alien Macintosh environment.” And the fourth appendix offers “a master keyboard-shortcut list for the entire Mac OS X universe.”  

Switching to the Mac offers sound reasons (1) why you may prefer to stick with certain Windows for Mac programs on your new Mac and (2) why you may want to abandon certain Windows programs written for Macs and learn to use the Mac programs that are better than, say, PowerPoint or Notepad, for example.

If you happen to be addicted to Microsoft Access and Microsoft Visio, you have a separate choice. You can either switch to FileMaker and OmniGraffle or keep a Windows machine sitting close to your new Mac.

You won’t be alone as a user caught between two different worlds. Writes Pogue: “A huge percentage of ‘switchers’ do not, in fact, switch.  Often, they just add.  They may get a Macintosh (and get into the Macintosh), but they keep the old Windows PC around, at least for a while.”

In my case, you’ll have to pry the Windows keyboard and mouse from my cold, dead fingers. But I’ll keep this hefty book with me, to use both as a how-to guide and as a bludgeon, each time I have to go into the Macintosh wilds and battle the Lion.

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir available now in paperback. He is the author of a detective novel, Erwin’s Law, a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

 

Fast Guide to Cubase 6 – Not so fast but packed with good info – #bookreview

Fast Guide to Cubase 6
By Simon Millward
(PC Publishing, paperback, list price $29.95)

I’m not sure a 474-page book should bill itself as a “fast guide.” For Simon Millward’s new work, a better descriptor would be “thorough.”

Steinberg Cubase 6 software is feature-rich and powerful software for music creation and audio recording. And this thick guidebook provides a thorough gathering of details, steps, tips and illustrations that show how to use the software’s many features.

The popular music software package has a reputation for being user-friendly and flexible. And it comes with a manual.

But Simon Millward’s book aims to provide readers with much more, including: (1) “the essential information to get you up and running in the shortest possible time”; and (2) descriptions of “advanced techniques and a wide range of theoretical knowledge which help you get better results.”

The major topics covered are:

  • Installing and setting up Cubase 6
  • Audio and MIDI recording and editing
  • Mixing, mastering and EQ (equalizers)
  • VST (Virtual Studio Technology) instruments and plug-in effects
  • Loop manipulation and beat design
  • Music production tips and tools
  • Media management

That is only a partial list, of course. The author cautions: “Before you can use Cubase you must have some idea of how to record and manipulate MIDI data, how to record and manipulate audio signals, how you are going to get an audio signal into the computer and how you are going to feed it back out into the real world.”

Fortunately, his well-written and helpfully illustrated book includes much of that crucial how-to information. It also provides a macro library, a heavy-duty glossary, and a useful list of Web resources. 

Computer-savvy musicians, music producers, sound recordists and audio professionals — and readers who aspire to be any of those — should consider owning and using Fast Guide to Cubase 6.

Si Dunn‘s latest book is a novel, Erwin’s Law. His other published works include Jump, a novella, and a book of poetry, plus several short stories, all available on Kindle.

A Bug Hunter’s Diary: A Guided Tour through the Wilds of Software Security – #programming #bookreview

A Bug Hunter’s Diary: A Guided Tour through the Wilds of Software Security
By Tobias Klein
(No Starch Press, paperback, list price $39.95; Kindle edition, list price $31.95)

If your passion or desire is to find and kill software bugs and fight hackers, you should check out this well-written how-to book.

Tobias Klein, an information security specialist, has tracked down many difficult bugs and identified security vulnerabilities in some of the world’s best-known software, including Apple’s iOS, the Mac OS X kernel, web browsers, and the VLC media player, among others.

Using a diary approach, plus code examples and illustrations, Klein describes a bug he has just discovered in a software package. Then he illustrates how it creates a security vulnerability that a hacker could exploit, and he describes how to fix or at least reduce its risks.

Chapters 2 through 8 each focus on separate bugs, and Klein includes a list of “lessons learned” for programmers who want to avoid creating similar problems.

Klein’s well-illustrated book is organized as follows:

  • Chapter 1: Bug Hunting – (a brief overview.)
  • Chapter 2: Back to the ‘90s – (shows how he discovered a bug and vulnerability in a Tivo movie file that allowed him to crash a VLC media player and gain control of the instruction pointer.)
  • Chapter 3: Escape from the WWW Zone – (illustrates how and where he found a bug in the Solaris kernel and the “exciting challenge” of demonstrating how it could be exploited for arbitrary code execution.)
  • Chapter 4: Null Pointer FTW – (describes “a really beautiful bug” that opened a vulnerability into “the FFmpeg multimedia library that is used by many popular software projects, including Google Chrome, VLC media player, MPlayer, and Xine to name just a few.”)
  • Chapter 5: Browse and You’re Owned – (discusses how he found an exploitable bug in an ActiveX control for Internet Explorer.)
  • Chapter 6: One Kernel to Rule Them All – (focuses on how he decided to search for bugs in some third-party Microsoft Windows drivers and found one in an antivirus software package.)
  • Chapter 7: A Bug Older than 4.4BSD – (how he found an exploitable bug in the XNU kernel OS X.)
  • Chapter 8: The Ringtone Massacre – (how he found an exploitable bug in an early version of the iPhone’s MobileSafari browser that enabled him to modify ringtone files and access the program counter.)
  • Appendix A: Hints for Hunting – (“…some vulnerability classes, exploitation techniques, and common issues that can lead to bugs.”)
  • Appendix B: Debugging – (about debuggers and the debugging process.)
  • Appendix C: Mitigation – (discusses mitigation techniques.)

Tobias Klein is the author of two previous information security books that were published in Germany. Because hackers use many of the same tools as those seeking to keep them out, there is an important limit on how much detail Klein is able to impart in this book.

As he notes in a disclaimer: “The goal of this book is to teach readers how to identify, protect against, and mitigate software security vulnerabilities. Understanding the techniques used to find and exploit vulnerabilities is necessary to thoroughly grasp the underlying problems and appropriate mitigation techniques. Since 2007, it is no longer legal to create or distribute “hacking tools” in Germany, my home country. Therefore, to comply with the law, no full working exploit code is provided in this book. The examples simply show the steps used to gain control of the execution flow (the instruction pointer or program counter control) of a vulnerable program.”

Si Dunn

Mac Attack! Three new books for Macintosh users – #bookreview

No Starch Press and O’Reilly Media recently have released three new books aimed at Macintosh users.

One is for Mac newcomers. Another is for those who want to learn a lot more about the Mac OS X Lion operating system without having to read “tersely written” Apple help screens. And the third is for programmers who want “to build native Mac OS X applications with a sleek, developer-friendly  alternative to Objective-C….”

Taking it easy first…

Doing ‘Simple Projects’ with a Mac

My New Mac Lion Edition: Simple Projects to Get You Started
By Wallace Wang
(No Starch Press, paperback, list price $29.95 ; Kindle edition, list price $9.99)

If you are computer newbie or switching over from Windows or other operating systems, here is a good book to help you put your new Mac to work in a hurry.

My New Mac Lion Edition shows how to do practical stuff such as connecting to the Web, playing and burning CDs and DVDs, pulling digital photos off your camera so you can edit and share them, and working with the Mac’s security features.

Given today’s risky Internet and office computing environment, it might have been better to describe the security features much earlier in the book, well before the working-online chapters. But as a practical guide to learning and using the Mac’s key features, this 472-page how-to guide is written well and has plenty of illustrations and clear lists of steps. It even describes several ways to eject a stuck CD or DVD.

The 56 chapters are grouped into seven parts:

  • Part 1: Basic Training – Everything from using the mouse to opening apps.
  • Part 2: Wrangling Files and Folders – Finding files, storing files, sharing files.
  • Part 3: Making Life Easier – Shortcut commands, controls, updating software, saving and retrieving contact information, using appointment calendar, and typing in foreign languages.
  • Part 4: Playing Music and Movies – Playing audio CDs, ripping and burning audio CDs, playing a DVD, listening to online programs and free college lectures, and editing videos with iMovie.
  • Part 5: The Digital Shutterbug – Transferring, editing and displaying digital photographs.
  • Part 6: Surfing and Sharing on the Internet – Numerous things web and email, plus instant messaging with iChat.
  • Part 7: Maintaining Your Mac – Energy conservation, ejecting stuck CDs/DVDs, password protecting  your Mac, encrypting your data, and configuring your firewall.

The author, Wallace Wang, has written several best-selling computer books. He’s also an ongoing career as a standup comic.

More IS Better: What to Do with 50+ Programs and 250 New Features

Mac OS X Lion: The Missing Manual
By David Pogue
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $34.99)

David Pogue created the popular Missing Manual series, and the New York Times technology columnist definitely knows how to put together a good how-to book.

His 909-page Mac OS X Lion: The Missing Manual is exactly what you need to become (over time and with diligent effort, of course) a Mac power user. It’s also what you need if you’d rather settle for being a well-informed user who likes having a handy source  for looking up information about a Mac feature or program.

In this book, you begin well beneath the “Hello, World!” level by learning to say “oh-ess-ten,” not “oh-ess-ex.” Once you master that, you get to move into “The New Lion Landscape,” where you are informed that “Apple’s overarching design philosophy in creating Mac OS X was: ‘Make it more like an iPad.'”

Then, you quickly learn how to use “Full Screen Mode, Safari” and “Full Screen Apps, Mission Control.” And, by the way, you are still officially in Chapter 0 at this point (that’s “zero,” not “oh”).

Pogue’s book is smoothly written. (You don’t, after all, just luck into writing for the Times.) It has a good array of screenshots and other illustrations. And it offers plenty of tips and notes amid the instructional paragraphs.

The book’s six parts (with seven chapters each) are focused as follows:

  • Part 1: The Mac OS X Desktop – “[C]overs everything you see on the screen when you turn on a Mac OS X computer….”
  • Part 2: Programs in Mac OS X – Describes “how to launch them, switch among them, swap data between them, use them to create and open files, and control them using the AppleScript and Automator automation tools.”
  • Part 3: The Components of Mac OS X – “[A]n item-by-item discussion of the individual software nuggets that make up this operating system–the 29 panels of System Preferences and the 50-some programs in your Applications and Utilities folders.”
  • Part 4: The Technologies of Mac OS X – “Networking, file sharing, and screen sharing…” plus “fonts, printing, graphics, handwriting recognition…sound, speech, movies…” and even some looks at how to use “Mac OS X’s Unix underpinnings.”
  • Part 5: Mac OS X Online – “[C]overs all of the Internet features of Mac OS X.” Everything from email to chatting to working in the cloud, and even “connecting to, and controlling, your Mac from across the wires — FTP, SSH, VPN, and so on.”
  • Part 6: Appendixes – These include a Windows-to-Mac dictionary (for Windows refugees), information on installing Mac OS X, troubleshooting information, and “a thorough master list of all the keyboard shortcuts and trackpad/mouse gestures in Lion.”

If you’re serious about using your Mac and weary of opening endless not-so-helpful help screens, you should seriously consider owning this book.

A Programmer’s Guide to MacRuby

MacRuby: The Definitive Guide
By Matt Aimonetti
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $39.99; Kindle edition, list price $31.99)

“MacRuby,” the author says, “is Apple’s implementation of the Ruby programming language on top of the Objective-C technology stack.”

His book is a straightforward, no-nonsense guide intended to show developers how “to write native applications for the Cocoa environment using the popular Ruby syntax as well as the well-known and robust Objective-C and C libraries.”

He declares his work “neither a Ruby book nor a Cocoa book,” but states that “it should provide you with enough information to understand the MacRuby environment and create rich applications for the OS X platform.”

MacRuby: The Definitive Guide is segmented into two major parts. Part 1 (“MacRuby Overview”) introduces MacRuby, including what it is, how it’s installed, how it works, what you can do with it, and how it relates to what you already probably know. Part 2 (titled “MacRuby in Practice”)  “covers concrete examples of applications you might want to develop in MacRuby.”

Using short, concise code examples, Matt Aimonetti helps the reader dive straight into MacRuby, beginning at the classic “Hello, World!” entry point, with a little twist.

In just 35 lines of code, you learn how to build a graphical user interface (GUI) application that displays the words “MacRuby: The Definitive Guide” in a window with a button. The window shows “Hello World!” within a box, and your computer speaks “Hello, world!” when you click on the button.

The first eight chapters focus on topics such as: introduction, fundamentals, foundation, application kit, Xcode, core data, and getting deeper into the process of “developing complex apps.”

The topics of the final five chapters are: (1) creating an Address Book example; (2) creating an application that “uses the user’s geographical location and a location web service”; (3) using MacRuby in Objective-C projects; (4) using Objective-C code in MacRuby apps; and (5) using Ruby third-party libraries. 

Before reading this book and tackling the code, the author recommends having some programming experience and basic familiarity with object-oriented programming. You also should get a basic overview of the Ruby language by visiting its main website.

Si Dunn 

Droid X2: The Missing Manual – #droid #bookreview

Droid X2: The Missing Manual
By Preston Gralla
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $19.99; Kindle edition, list price $9.99)

Got, getting or giving a Droid X2 smartphone?

Consider adding this useful how-to manual to the mix. Droid X2: The Missing Manual bills itself as “The book that should have been in the box.” But it’s likely much bigger than the phone’s box.

The 399-page manual, written by veteran technology writer Preston Gralla, is nicely structured, well-illustrated and chock full of information on using the Droid X2’s many features. The book is organized into six parts.

 Part 1 covers “Android Basics.” It gives a guided tour of features and shows how to make calls, do text messages, manage contacts, use Caller ID, make conference calls, and handle other tasks.

Part 2 focuses on “Camera, Pix, Music, and Video” and how you can use a Droid X2 to take photographs, play and manage music, and record, edit and view videos.

Part 3, “Maps, Apps, and Calendar,” shows “how to navigate using a GPS, to find any location in the world with maps, to find your own location on a map, to get weather and news, to use a great calendar app, and to synchronize that calendar with your Google calendar, or even an Outlook calendar,” Gralla writes.

Part 4, “Android Online,” discusses “everything you need to know about the Droid X2’s remarkable online talents.” This includes getting online over Verizon’s network or a wi-fi hotspot, using your Droid X2 as a portable G3 hotspot, checking email, surfing the Internet and downloading and using apps.

Part 5 covers “Advanced Topics,” including syncing and transferring files between a Droid X2 and a Mac or a PC, using your voice to control your Droid, and using your Droid at your workplace. Part 5 also includes a nice listing of Droid X2 settings.

Part 6, “Appendixes,” has three “reference chapters” showing how to activate a Droid X2, which accessories are available, and how to troubleshoot various issues.

This “Missing Manual” includes a link to a website where you can keep up with updates and changes to the Droid X2, plus corrections to the book.

Meanwhile, a “Missing CD” web page link provided in the book gives clickable links to the websites that are mentioned in the text.

Many new users of the Droid X2 likely will find this book helpful. So will experienced users who have mostly focused on voice calls and text messages and now want to master some of their smartphone’s other features. 

Si Dunn