Introducing Windows Server 2012 – A guide to what’s coming in a much-anticipated release – #bookreview #microsoft

Introducing Windows Server® 2012
Mitch Tulloch with the Microsoft Server Team
(Microsoft Press, paperback, list price $14.99; Kindle edition,
list price $0.00)

 The anticipated release date for the new version of Microsoft Server®  is sometime between the third quarter of 2012 and early 2013. And this book’s introduction hails it as “probably the most significant release of the Windows Server platform ever.”

Windows Server® 2012, it states, will offer “an innovative new user interface, powerful new management tools, enhanced Windows PowerShell support, and hundreds of new features in the areas of networking, storage and virtualization.”

There also will be major emphasis on cloud computing. The product has been “designed for the cloud from the ground up and provides a foundation for building both public and private cloud solutions,” the book declares.

Introducing Windows Server® 2012 is “based on beta,” according to the cover disclaimer. And, according to the author, the book  “represents a ‘first look’ based on the public beta release of Windows Server 2012 and is intended to help IT professionals familiarize themselves with the capabilities of the new platform.”

The 235-page book is divided into five chapters:

  • Chapter 1 presents “The business need for Windows Server® 2012.” Not surprisingly, the main focus is on cloud computing and multi-server platforms.
  • Chapter 2’s focus is “Foundation for building your private cloud” and how the new product can provide “a solid foundation for building dynamic, highly scalable, multi-tenant cloud environments.”
  • Chapter 3 looks at the Windows Server® 2012 features and capabilities that can create a “[h]ighly available, easy-to-manage multi-server platform.”
  • Chapter 4 discusses how you can use the product to “[d]eploy web applications on premises and in the cloud,” with its “scalable and elastic web platform” and “[s]upport for open standards.”
  • Chapter 5 focuses on Windows Server® 2012 features and capabilities that are key to “[e]nabling the modern workstyle.” The author states: “Today’s business users want things simple. They want to be able to access their desktop applications, and data virtually anywhere, from any device, and have the full Windows experience. And from an IT perspective, this must be done securely and in ways that can ensure compliance at all times.”

Since this book is a “first look” written prior to the ready-to-manufacture (RTM) date, some of its screenshots, feature descriptions and stated capabilities may differ somewhat from the product that will be released.

But this overview can be a useful – and inexpensive — guide to have handy while considering whether to move to, or upgrade to, Windows Server® 2012.

Si Dunn

Oh, Say Can You C#? – C# 5.0 in a Nutshell & C# 5.0 Pocket Reference -#programming #bookreview

O’Reilly recently has released two handy and helpful books for practitioners and students of the C# object-oriented programming language. One is a hefty, 1042-page “definitive reference” that (in paperback format) can double as a handy weight for physical exercise. The other is a compact, 215-page reference that really does fit in a coat pocket or pants pocket (but not a typical shirt pocket, unless you happen to wear an XXL, or larger, shirt).

Starting first with the muscle-building reference guide that weighs in at nearly three pounds…

C# 5.0 in a Nutshell, 5th Edition
Joseph Albahari and Ben Albahari
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $49.99; Kindle edition, list price $39.99)

This latest Nutshell edition covers C# 5.0, “the fourth major update to Microsoft’s flagship programming language, an update that positions C# “as a language with unusual flexibility and breadth,” the authors state.

They note: “At one end, it [C#] offers high-level abstractions, such as query expressions and asynchronous continuations, while at the other end, it provides low-level power through constructions such as custom value types and the optional use of pointers.”

The revised and expanded new edition “covers C#, the CLR [Common Language Runtime], and the core Framework assemblies. The authors have chosen this focus “to allow space for difficult topics such as concurrency, security and application domains—without compromising depth or readability.” It’s hard to argue with the “depth” of a book 1,000+ pages long. And the book is written clearly, with numerous short code examples to illustrate its points.

C# 5.0 in a Nutshell is aimed at readers with intermediate to expert knowledge of programming, but no prior knowledge of C# is assumed. Indeed, chapters two through four provide an introduction to C# basics, starting just above the “Hello, World” level with a program that multiplies 12 times 30. The remaining chapters cover advanced C# 5.0 topics and the core .NET framework. With just a few exceptions, you can read these chapters randomly.

The hefty book has a hefty index. It has been “shaped by more than 20 expert reviewers,” including several from Microsoft. And the authors have solid backgrounds in their subject matter.

And now, for something a bit lighter…

C# 5.0 Pocket Reference
Joseph Albahari and Ben Albahari
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $19.99; Kindle edition, list price $11.99)

The Nutshell authors have boiled their big book down to a very practical aid that you can easily carry to work, class or your favorite coffee shop or when traveling. Conveniently, the Pocket Reference still includes an introduction to C# 5.0’s fundamentals, starting with the simple multiplication program. It also covers many advanced topics, ranging from operator overload and Language Integrated Query (LINQ) to preprocessor directives, custom attributes, and XML documentation.

This book is not organized by chapters, so you will find yourself making frequent use of the book’s two-page table of contents and 12-page index, particularly if you are new to C# 5.0.

But you can readily find brief explanations, code samples and illustrations that define and clarify much of what you are seeking. And you will appreciate the book’s convenient size.

Si Dunn

Inside Windows Debugging: Practical Debugging and Tracing Strategies – #bookreview #in #programming

Inside Windows Debugging: Practical Debugging and Tracing Strategies
Tarik Soulami
(Microsoft Press,
paperback, list price $39.99; Kindle edition, list price $31.99)

Debugging and tracing tools — and the willingness and strategies to use them — should be key aspects of any software development and testing process.

Inside Windows Debugging is intended for software engineers who want to “perfect their mastery of Windows as a development platform through the use of debugging and tracing tools.”

Yet anyone serious about learning, using and supporting Windows can benefit from this book. Its first few chapters provide basic explanations of debugging and tracing tools and how to acquire the right packages and use them. From there, the author presents and explains numerous code examples that demonstrate many types of bugs and related problems in software. So it is helpful to have at least a little experience with C/C++ and C# programming languages.

Inside Windows Debugging has 560 pages, including an extensive index, and is divided into three parts: (1) “A Bit of Background”; (2) “Debugging for Fun and Profit”; and (3) “Observing and Analyzing Software Behavior.” Two appendices sum up common debugging tasks and show how to accomplish them using the WinDbg debugger.

To run the software and examples used in this book, you should have “Windows Vista or later.”

The author, however, “highly” recommends at least having Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2. And in some of the kernel debugging exercises, a second computer will be needed to serve as a host kernel-mode debugger machine.

Si Dunn

For developers and system administrators: Windows Internals, Part 1, 6th Edition – #bookreview

Windows Internals, Part 1 – 6th Edition
Mark Russinovich, David A. Solomon, Alex Ionescu
(Microsoft Press, paperback, list price $39.99; Kindle edition, list price $31.99)

This latest Windows Internals guide is being released in two parts that are “fully updated for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.”

“Updating the book for each release of Windows takes considerable time so producing it in two parts allows us to publish the first part earlier,” according to Microsoft Press and the authors.

Part 1 is now available. Meanwhile, Part 2 is scheduled to be released sometime this fall.

Part 1 has 726 pages and is divided into seven chapters:

  • Concepts and Tools
  • System Architecture
  • System Mechanisms
  • Management Mechanisms
  • Processes, Threads, and Jobs
  • Security
  • Networking

Part 2, once it becomes available, will offer these seven additional chapters:

  • I/O System
  • Storage Management
  • Memory Management
  • Cache Management
  • File Systems
  • Startup and Shutdown
  • Crash Dump Analysis

Both parts of Windows Internals, Sixth Edition, are aimed at advanced computer professionals (developers and system administrators) “who want to understand how the core components of the Microsoft Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 RS operating systems work internally.”

Such knowledge can help developers “better comprehend the rationale behind design choices when building applications specific to the Windows platform,” the authors note. For system administrators, having a deeper understanding of how the operating system works “facilitates understanding the performance behavior of the system and makes troubleshooting system problems much easier when things go wrong.”

The book is heavily illustrated with screenshots, tables, diagrams and other illustrations.

And it features a number of hands-on experiments to help you dig deeper into how Windows works inside, using tools such as “the kernel debugger and tools from Sysinternals and Winsider Seminars & Solutions.”

What Part 1 and the forthcoming Part 2 will not do, the authors point out, is “describe how to use, program, or configure Windows.”

– Si Dunn

Security and Privacy for Microsoft Office 2010 Users – #bookreview #in

Security and Privacy for Microsoft Office 2010 Users
Mitch Tulloch
(Microsoft Press,
paperback, list price $9.99; Kindle edition, $0.00)
 

If you work for a company that uses Microsoft Office products, or if you have them in your own business, you may be concerned about security and privacy as you publish documents, download documents or collaborate on projects online. Indeed, there may be formal security and privacy restrictions in place.

At the same time, because of workload, you may have little time for formal training in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. And you may not get much guidance on how you are supposed to comply with your employer’s restrictions. Indeed, you may be required and expected to just learn this stuff on your own.

This handy 84-page guidebook can help. Using typical office scenarios, it covers a number of everyday topics. These include working with Protected View, removing private information from documents, signing documents digitally, marking documents as final so they can’t be modified, encrypting documents, password-only access to documents, and restricting who can edit a document.

Security and Privacy for Microsoft Office 2010 Users is recommended for intermediate-level users of Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. But the examples and illustrations are clear enough for Microsoft Office newcomers, as well.

Si Dunn

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Three new specialized how-to books for SharePoint, JQuery & Mac OS X Lion Server – #bookreview #in #programming

Here are three new books for those with at least some basic to intermediate experience with Microsoft SharePoint, or web development, or Mac OS X Lion.

Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Creating and Implementing Real-World Projects
By Jennifer Mason, Christian Buckley, Brian T. Jackett, and Wes Preston
(Microsoft Press,
paperback, list price $34.99; Kindle edition, list price $27.99)

If you have some background in Microsoft SharePoint and want to dig deeper, this book can help you learn how to use SharePoint to create real-world solutions to ten common business problems.

Each chapter is devoted to a single project, such as creating a FAQ system to help users quickly find answers to their questions, setting up a help desk solution to track service requests, or building a simple project management system.

The projects are based on “various scenarios encountered by the authors as we have used SharePoint as a tool to build solutions that address business needs….Each of the solutions has been implemented in one or more organization,” they state.

Do not jump into Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Creating and Implementing Real-World Projects until you have gained “a general understanding of the basics of SharePoint,” the authors caution. And note that SharePoint is not easily defined as one “type” of product.

If you keep in mind the process of building a house, they write, “SharePoint is like the various tools and materials, and the final business solutions you build are like the house. There are many features and tools in SharePoint, and within this book, you will see different ways to combine and structure them into business solutions.”

Their 403-page book is well written and cleanly organized with short paragraphs and many headings, step lists and illustrations. It also has an extensive index.

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JQuery: Novice to Ninja, 2nd Edition
By Earle Castledine and Craig Sharkie
(SitePoint,
paperback, list price $39.95; Kindle edition, list price $29.95)

Technology changes fast, and web developers curious about JQuery will welcome this updated edition of Earle Castledine’s and Craig Sharkie’s book that first appeared in 2010.

This also is not a book for beginners. “You should,” the authors note, “already have intermediate to advanced HTML and CSS skills, as JQuery uses CSS-style selectors to zero in on page elements. Some rudimentary programming knowledge will be helpful to have,” they add, “as JQuery—despite its clever abstractions—is still based on JavaScript.” 

The authors offer high praise for the power of JQuery: “Aside from being a joy to use, one of the biggest benefits of JQuery is that it handles a lot of infuriating cross-browser issues for you. Anyone who has written serious JavaScript in the past can attest that cross-browser inconsistencies will drive you mad.”

They describe how to download and include the latest version of JQuery in web pages. And their book is organized to introduce JQuery features and code examples while also showing you, step by step, how to build a complete working application.

JQuery: Novice to Ninja, 2nd Edition has plenty of illustrations and is well indexed and written in a friendly, approachable style. 

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Using Mac OS X Lion Server
By Charles Edge
(O’Reilly,
paperback, list price $29.99; Kindle edition, list price $23.99)

Yes, intermediate and advanced system administrators will find some useful information in this well-written and nicely illustrated guide.

“But the book,” says author Charles Edge, “is really meant for new system administrators: the owner of the small business, the busy parent trying to manage all of those iPhone and iPads the kids are running around with, the teacher with a classroom full of iMacs or iPads, and of course, the new podcaster, just looking for a place to host countless hours of talking about the topic of her choice.”

What Using Mac OS X Lion Server  does not cover is “managing a Lion Server from the command line, scripting client management, or other advanced topics.”

The topics it does cover include: Planning for and installing a server; sharing and backing up files; sharing address books, calendars, and iChat; Wikis, webs and blogs; building a mail server; building a podcasting server; managing Apple computers and iOS devices; network services; and deploying Mac OS X computers.

The author cautions: “In many ways, the traditional system administrator will find Lion challenging in its consumeristic approach. There is a lot of power under the hood, but the tools used to manage the server have been simplified so that anyone can manage it, not just veteran Unix gods.”

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir. He is the author of an e-book detective novel, Erwin’s Law, now also available in paperback, plus a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Lion Edition – #bookreview #in #mac #windows

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Lion Edition
By David Pogue
(O’Reilly,
paperback, list price $29.99; Kindle edition, list price $23.99)

I own and use three Windows PCs during a typical day. But sometimes (don’t ask why), I find myself forced – forced – to use my wife’s Macintosh.

Grrrr. Where do I click? Where are the other mouse buttons? And what do these geeky, alien icons actually mean?

Frankly, I’ve hated Macs for a long, long time. And I’ve especially hated the smug, “Everything’s simpler on a Mac!” attitude that peppy Mac users seem to radiate whenever they are around us gray-haired Windows types who  have been messing with command prompts, anti-virus software, and the Blue Screen of Death since (seemingly) the War of 1812.

That being said, I am a big fan of New York Times tech columnist David Pogue and “The Missing Manual” book series he created.  I use several of O’Reilly’s “Missing” manuals on a frequent basis.

Pogue’s new book is now proving useful for me as a sort of Klingon-to-English translation guide when I am forced – forced –to use my beloved’s dearly beloved Mac.

But in all seriousness, if you are contemplating making the switch or have already switched from Windows to Mac (traitor!), you need this book. It is a well-written, nicely illustrated user’s guide with a strong focus on how to transfer documents and other files from Windows machines to Macs. Often, the transfers go smoothly. “It turns out that communicating with a Windows PC is one of the Mac’s most polished talents,” Pogue notes.

Sometimes, however, the transfers do not go well. Pogue’s huge book (691 pages) also points out some potential pitfalls and remedies, such as possibly losing “memorized transactions, customized report designs, and reconciliations” when transferring from QuickBooks for Windows to QuickBooks to Mac.

Switching to the Mac is organized into five parts:

  • Part 1, Welcome to the Macintosh – Covers the essentials of “everything you see onscreen when you turn on the machine.”
  • Part 2, Making the Move – Covers “the actual process of hauling your software, settings, and even peripherals (like printers and monitors) across the chasm from the PC to the Mac.” Includes steps for running Windows on Macs, “an extremely attractive option.”
  • Part 3, Making Connections – Shows how to set up an Internet connection on a Mac and use Apple’s Internet software suite.
  • Part 4, Putting Down Roots – Gets into more advanced topics “to turn you into a Macintosh power user.”
  • Part 5, Appendixes – Two of the four appendixes cover installation and troubleshooting. One is the “Where’d It Go?” Dictionary for those trying to find familiar Windows controls “in the new, alien Macintosh environment.” And the fourth appendix offers “a master keyboard-shortcut list for the entire Mac OS X universe.”  

Switching to the Mac offers sound reasons (1) why you may prefer to stick with certain Windows for Mac programs on your new Mac and (2) why you may want to abandon certain Windows programs written for Macs and learn to use the Mac programs that are better than, say, PowerPoint or Notepad, for example.

If you happen to be addicted to Microsoft Access and Microsoft Visio, you have a separate choice. You can either switch to FileMaker and OmniGraffle or keep a Windows machine sitting close to your new Mac.

You won’t be alone as a user caught between two different worlds. Writes Pogue: “A huge percentage of ‘switchers’ do not, in fact, switch.  Often, they just add.  They may get a Macintosh (and get into the Macintosh), but they keep the old Windows PC around, at least for a while.”

In my case, you’ll have to pry the Windows keyboard and mouse from my cold, dead fingers. But I’ll keep this hefty book with me, to use both as a how-to guide and as a bludgeon, each time I have to go into the Macintosh wilds and battle the Lion.

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir available now in paperback. He is the author of a detective novel, Erwin’s Law, a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

 

Node for Front-End Developers – Writing server-side JavaScript applications – #bookreview #in

Node for Front-End Developers
By Garann Means
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $14.99; Kindle edition, list price $7.99)

Node is a JavaScript platform used to create server-side applications, communicate with the client, work with data, create dynamic web pages, and handle other tasks.

According to the Joyent Incorporated’s nodejs website: “Node.js is a platform built on Chrome’s JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications. Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.”

Node’s library has many modules created by developers who have focused on automating server-side development. But Garann Means’ new, 45-page book shows how you can get started programming for back-end servers using Node and JavaScript.  

Node.js is easy to download.  And, according to Node for Front-End Developers: “Node is easy to set up or very easy to set up. Node runs on Unix-compatible systems and, more recently, Windows.”

The how-to-get-started instructions, however, are a bit sparse in this thin book, and virtually nonexistent for Windows. Beginners who don’t have much experience with JavaScript may puzzle over a number of basic “What now?” and “WTF?” issues. 

Sparse information for Node beginners, however, is not limited to Node for Front-End Developers. I checked several other sources of  Node documentation and found similar problems. You’re just supposed to know this stuff, I guess. 

As one example, I followed the book’s instructions to create Node’s important package.json file, then discovered that what I had downloaded from Nodejs already contained a package.json file. In fact, it was now in several subdirectories. Was I supposed to edit it, instead? Delete it and replace it with my file? Had I just screwed up the installation by creating my own file?

After a lot of horsing around with node and npm at the command line and getting strange results at the not-quite “Hello World” level, I happened across a small note on the GitHub.com website. It stated that Node’s “Windows builds are not yet satisfactorily stable but it is possible to get something running.”

Especially if you resort to package managers to help you out.  And maybe get assistance from a Node guru. [See UPDATE below.]

Yes, I was indeed attempting a Windows setup, and I did get Node to partially work. But after several tries at reinstalling, rebooting, debugging, and attempting to supplement the book with conflicting bits of  information downloaded from the web, I gave up having “fun” with Node. (UPDATE: Recently, I reviewed my command line procedures a bit, looked again at my files and subdirectory structure and tried again. This time, Node works fine at the “Hello, World” level and beyond. I stand by my criticism that this book’s how-to-get-started instructions should be made clearer for Windows users. But I am at fault, too, for not figuring out what I was doing wrong much sooner.)  

Your results likely will be much better than mine, especially if you have more than novice experience with JavaScript.  and are using something other than (and better than?) a Windows machine. 

As for Node for Front-End Developers, the rest of the book appears to be an easy-to-use guide to getting a basic understanding of the Node platform. The code examples look good and are preceded by well-written explanations. I have now tested some of them successfully and plan to try a few of the longer, more-complex examples soon. wish I could have tested more of them. But I intend to keep this book and try Node again once easier and more stable Windows options are available.

The book’s chapters are:

  • Chapter 1, Getting Node Set Up
  • Chapter 2, Serving Simple Content
  • Chapter 3, Interaction with the Client
  • Chapter 4, Server-Side Templates
  • Chapter 5, Data Sources and Flow Control
  • Chapter 6, Model-View-Controller and Sharing Code

How-to-get-started instructions are vital in any programming and developer’s book, in my view. And they need careful preparation and presentation for every major operating system that is supported.

Countless beginners are looking for new programming and development paths and challenges, and many of them will buy books that are beyond their experience level so they can try to learn faster and backfill as they go. Most of them also won’t have the latest-and-greatest hardware and software. Therefore, minimum requirements need to be spelled out clearly, as well.

Don’t let my blunderings with Windows dissuade you from considering this book. Node has been hot, and if you have JavaScript experience at the browser level, Node for Front-End Developers can help you learn how to work on back-end servers, too.

It pays to be versatile in today’s fast-paced tech world.

But yeah, I probably do need a Mac and a Linux machine flanking my Windows PC.

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir available soon in paperback. He also is the author of a detective novel, Erwin’s Law, a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Pocket Consultant – Just add LARGE pocket – #bookreview #sxswi #in

Microsoft© SQL Server© 2012 Pocket Consultant
By William P. Stanek
(Microsoft Press,
paperback, list price $39.99; Kindle edition, list price $31.99)

Yes, you will need a big pocket to carry around this 558-page “practical, portable guide.”

It’s intended for: (1) SQL Server administrators; (2) those making the transition to administrator status; and (3) anyone with SQL Server responsibility in a company that is upgrading from older versions to the newest, Microsoft SQL Server 2012.

If your pockets aren’t big enough to do the job, put it in a bag, stick it on a shelf near your workstation, or store it in digital format so you can read it on your mobile device. In other words, get it – whether you are experienced with SQL Server 2012 or still in the process of learning it.

The book is well-written and well-structured. And it is reasonably well-illustrated with screenshots, code samples, tables, notes, tips, lists and step-by-step instructions. It also has been given some good editing: At the time of this review, the book’s errata page showed no confirmed issues.

The author, William R. Stanek, is the series editor for Microsoft’s “Pocket Consultant” books. He has written more than 100 books, and he has more than 20 years’ experience in advanced programming and systems management.

His latest “Pocket Consultant” work is structured into four parts with a total of 12 chapters and a nicely detailed, 23-page index.

Part 1 is titled “Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Essentials.” The chapters are:

  • Chapter 1, Managing Your SQL Servers
  • Chapter 2, Managing SQL Server Services and Clients

Part 2 is “Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Management and Security.” Its chapters are:

  • Chapter 3, Implementing Policy-Based Management
  • Chapter 4, Configuring and Tuning Your SQL Servers
  • Chapter 5, Tuning and Linking Your SQL Servers
  • Chapter 6, Database Administration Essentials
  • Chapter 7, Implementing SQL Server 2012 Security

Part 3 is titled “Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Data Management.” The chapters are:

  • Chapter 8, Manipulating Schemas, Tables, and Views
  • Chapter 9, Using Indexes, Constraints, and Partitions

Part 4 is “Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Optimization, Maintenance, and Recovery.” The chapters are:

  • Chapter 10, Automating and Maintaining SQL Server 2012
  • Chapter 11, SQL Server 2012 Backup and Recovery
  • Chapter 12, SQ: Server 2012 Profiling and Monitoring

The author assumes that you are “fairly familiar with SQL commands and stored procedures as well as the Windows user interface.” He urges that if you are new to SQL and Microsoft SQL Server 2012, pick up a few other books, too. There is, he notes, “simply no way that one book can do it all.”

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir available soon in paperback. He also is the author of a detective novel, Erwin’s Law, a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

SharePoint 2010 for Project Management, 2nd Edition – #bookreview

SharePoint 2010 for Project Management, 2nd Edition
By Dux Raymond Sy
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $44.99; Kindle edition, list price $34.99)

Project management now provides the top use of Microsoft SharePoint 2010, and this updated edition quickly jumps straight into using SharePoint to create and run a Project Management Information System (PMIS). 

The book is written and structured for those “not interested in the nitty-gritty technical details of SharePoint,” the author says. His work “is focused on helping you leverage SharePoint for project management regardless of what industry you are in.”

And he emphasizes: “If you are interested in using SharePoint to deploy a corporate portal, create an ecommerce website, or develop a proprietary SharePoint application, this is not the book for you.”

In organizations large and small and even for individual users, “[t]he main purpose of SharePoint is to empower users with document management and team collaboration tools,” the author notes.  He points out that “SharePoint does not refer to a specific product or technology. Using the phrase ‘Microsoft SharePoint’ is like using the phrase ‘Microsoft Office.” It refers to several aspects of collaborative solutions.”

 This new edition is aimed at project managers, project team members, program managers, IT/IS directors and SharePoint consultants.

The 209-page book has nine chapters:

  • 1. Project Kickoff
  • 2. Setting Up the PMIS
  • 3. Adding PMIS Components
  • 4. Adding Stakeholders to the PMIS
  • 5. Supporting Team Collaboration
  • 6. Project Tracking
  • 7. Project Reporting
  • 8. Integrating PM Tools
  • 9. Project Closing

SharePoint 2010 for Project Management, 2nd Edition is well-written and tightly focused, with how-to instructions and illustrations on nearly every page.  It also provides a case study so readers can practice applying PMIS skills in SharePoint.

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. His latest book is a detective novel, Erwin’s Law. His other published works include Jump, a novella, and a book of poetry, plus several short stories, including The 7th Mars Cavalry, all available on Kindle.