Hadoop is hot! Three new how-to books for riding the Big Data elephant – #programming #bookreview

In the world of Big Data, Hadoop has become the hard-charging elephant in the room.

Its big-name users now span the alphabet and include such notables as Amazon, eBay, Facebook, Google, the New York Times, and Yahoo. Not bad for software named after a child’s toy elephant.

Computer systems that run Hadoop can store, process, and analyze large amounts of data that have been gathered up in many different formats from many different sources.

According to the Apache Software Foundation’s Hadoop website: “The Apache Hadoop software library is a framework that allows for the distributed processing of large data sets across clusters of computers using simple programming models. It is designed to scale up from single servers to thousands of machines, each offering local computation and storage.”

The (well-trained) user defines the Big Data problem that Hadoop will tackle. Then the software handles all aspects of the job completion, including spreading out the problem in small pieces to many different computers, or nodes, in the distributed system for more efficient processing. Hadoop also handles individual node failures, and collects and combines the calculated results from each node.

But you don’t need a collection of hundreds or thousands of computers to run Hadoop. You can learn it, write programs, and do some testing and debugging on a single Linux machine, Windows PC or Mac. The Open Source software can be downloaded here. (Do some research first. You may have use web searches to find detailed installation instructions for your specific system.)

Hadoop is open-source software that is often described as “a Java-based framework for large-scale data processing.” It has a lengthy learning curve that includes getting familiar with Java, if you don’t already know it.

But if you are now ready and eager to take on Hadoop, Packt Publishing recently has unveiled three excellent how-to books that can help you begin and extend your mastery: Hadoop Beginner’s Guide, Hadoop MapReduce Cookbook, and Hadoop Real-World Solutions Cookbook.

Short reviews of each are presented below.

Hadoop Beginner’s Guide
Garry Turkington
(Packt Publishing – paperback, Kindle)

Garry Turkington’s new book is a detailed, well-structured introduction to Hadoop. It covers everything from the software’s three modes–local standalone mode, pseudo-distributed mode, and fully distributed mode–to running basic jobs, developing simple and advanced MapReduce programs, maintaining clusters of computers, and working with Hive, MySQL, and other tools.

“The developer focuses on expressing the transformation between source and result data sets, and the Hadoop framework manages all aspects of job execution, parallelization, and coordination,” the author writes.

He calls this capability “possibly the most important aspect of Hadoop. The platform takes responsibility for every aspect of executing the processing across the data. After the user defines the key criteria for the job, everything else becomes the responsibility of the system.”

The 374-page book is written well and provides numerous code samples and illustrations. But it  has one drawback for some beginners who want to install and  use Hadoop.  Turkington offers step-by-step instructions for how to perform a Linux installation, specifically Ubuntu. However, he refers Windows and Mac users to an Apache site where there is insufficient how-to information. Web searches become necessary to find more installation details.

Hadoop MapReduce Cookbook
Srinath Perera and Thilina Gunarathne
(Packt Publishing – paperback, Kindle)

MapReduce “jobs” are an essential part of  how Hadoop is able to crunch huge chunks of Big Data.  The Hadoop MapReduce Cookbook offers “recipes for analyzing large and complex data sets with Hadoop MapReduce.”

MapReduce is a well-known programming model for processing large sets of data. Typically, MapReduce is used within clusters of computers that are configured to perform distributed computing.

In the “Map” portion of the process, a problem is split into many subtasks that are then assigned by a master computer to individual computers known as nodes. (Nodes also can have sub-nodes). During the “Reduce” part of the task, the master computer gathers up the processed data from the nodes, combines it and outputs a response to the problem that was posed to be solved. (MapReduce libraries are now available for many different computer languages, including Hadoop.)

“Hadoop is the most widely known and widely used implementation of the MapReduce paradigm,” the two authors note.

Their 284-page book initially shows how to run Hadoop in local mode, which “does not start any servers but does all the work within the same JVM [Java Virtual Machine]” on a standalone computer. Then, as you gain more experience with MapReduce and the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS), they guide you into using Hadoop in more complex, distributed-computing environments.

Echoing the Hadoop Beginner’s Guide, the authors explain how to install Hadoop on Linux machines only.

Hadoop Real-World Solutions Cookbook
Jonathan R. Owens, Jon Lentz and Brian Femiano
(Packt Publishing – paperback, Kindle)

The Hadoop Real-World Solutions Cookbook assumes you already have some experience with Hadoop. So it jumps straight into helping “developers become more comfortable with, and proficient at solving problems in, the Hadoop space.”

Its goal is to “teach readers how to build solutions using tools such as Apache Hive, Pig, MapReduce, Mahout, Giraph, HDFS, Accumulo, Redis, and Ganglia.”

The 299-page book is packed with code examples and short explanations that help solve specific types of problems. A few randomly selected problem headings:

  • “Using Apache Pig to filter bot traffic from web server logs.”
  • “Using the distributed cache in MapReduce.”
  • “Trim Outliers from the Audioscrobbler dataset using Pig and datafu.” 
  • “Designing a row key to store geographic events in Accumulo.”
  • “Enabling MapReduce jobs to skip bad records.”

The authors use a simple but effective strategy for presenting problems and solutions. First, the problem is clearly described. Then, under a “Getting Ready” heading, they spell out what you need to  solve the problem. That is followed by a “How to do it…” heading where each step is presented and supported by code examples. Then, paragraphs beneath a “How it works…” heading sum up and explain how the problem was solved. Finally, a “There’s more…” heading highlights more explanations and links to additional details.

If you are a Hadoop beginner, consider the first two books reviewed above. If you have some Hadoop experience, you likely can find some useful tips in book number three

Si Dunn

Spring Data: Modern Data Access for Enterprise Java – #java #bookreview

Spring Data: Modern Data Access for Enterprise Java
Mark Pollack, Oliver Gierke, Thomas Risberg, Jonathan L. Brisbin and Michael Hunger
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

Big Data keeps getting wider and deeper by the second. And so do the demands for analyzing and profiting from all of those piled-up terabytes.

Meanwhile, the once whiz-bang technology known as the relational database is having a very hard time keeping pace. The sheer amount of data that companies now gather, store, access, and analyze is pushing traditional relational databases to the breaking point.

Many Java developers who are trying to keep these overloaded systems held together with baling wire, also are starting to learn to work with some of the “alternative data stores that are being used in mission-critical enterprise applications,” the authors of Spring Data point out.

A lot of data now is being stored elsewhere and not in relational databases. Yet companies cannot abandon what they have already gathered and invested heavily to access. So they need to keep using and supporting their relational databases, plus some newer, faster, more voracious solutions lumped under the heading “NoSQL databases,” (even though you can query them).

In “the new data access landscape,” the authors note: “there is a revolution taking place, which for data geeks is quite exciting. Relational databases are not dead; they are still central to the operations of many enterprises and will remain so for quite some time. The trends, though, are very clear: new data access technologies are solving problems that traditional relational databases can’t, so we need to broaden our skill set as developers and have a foot in both camps.”

They add: “The Spring Framework has a long history of simplifying the development of Java applications, in particular for writing RDBMS-based data access layers that use Java database connectivity (JDBC) or object-relational mappers.”

Their new book “is intended to give you a hands-on introduction to the Spring Data project, whose core mission is to enable Java developers to use state-of-the-art data processing and manipulation tools but also use traditional databases in a state-of-the-art manner.”

They have organized their 288-page book into six parts and 14 chapters:

Part I – Background

  • Chapter 1 – The Spring Data Project
  • Chapter 2 – Repositories: Convenient Data Access Layers
  • Chapter 3 – Type-Safe Querying Using Querydsl

Part II – Relational Databases

  • Chapter 4 – JPA Repositories
  • Chapter 5 – Type-safe JDBC Programming with Querydsl SQL

Part III – NoSQL

  • Chapter 6 – MongoDB: A Document Store
  • Chapter 7 – Neo4j: A Graph Database
  • Chapter8 – Redis: A Key/Value Store

Part IV – Rapid Application Development

  • Chapter 9 – Persistence Layers with Spring Roo
  • Chapter 10 – REST Repository Exporter

Part V – Big Data

  • Chapter 11 – Spring for Apache Hadoop
  • Chapter 12 – Analyzing Data with Hadoop
  • Chapter 13 – Creating Big Data Pipelines with Spring Batch and Spring Integration

Part 5 – Data Grids

  • Chapter 14 – GemFire: A Distributed Data Grid

“Many of the values that have made Spring the preferred platform for enterprise Java developers deliver particular benefit in a world of fragmented persistence solutions,” states Ron Johnson, creator of Spring Framework. Writing in the book’s foreword, he notes: “Part of the value of Spring is how it brings consistency (without descending to a lowest common denominator) in its approach to different technologies with which it integrates.

“A distinct ‘Spring way’ helps shorten the learning curve for developers and simplifies code maintenance. If you are already familiar with Spring, you will find that Spring Data eases your exploration and adoption of unfamiliar stores. If you aren’t already familiar with Spring, this is a good opportunity to see how Spring can simplify your code and make it more consistent.”

Spring Data definitely is not light reading, but it is well-written, and provides a good blending of procedures, steps, explanations, code samples, screenshots and other illustrations.

Si Dunn

WordPress: The Missing Manual – Covers what you need to know & can profit from – #bookreview

WordPress: The Missing Manual
Matthew MacDonald
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

It’s easy to set up and launch a basic WordPress blog. But once you do, it’s also very easy to just keep blogging and ignore the many other options and features that WordPress offers. (I’m guilty of that, which is why I’m happy to see this book.)

If you want to know more about how to use WordPress or how to improve the appearance of an existing blog, WordPress: The Missing Manual definitely should be in your hands.  Matthew MacDonald’s new book is well-written, heavily illustrated, and packed with good how-to steps and tips.

Many small businesses and numerous large companies also use WordPress to provide some or all of their web presence. MacDonald’s 545-page how-guide has essential information for these users, too.

The book is organized into five parts:

  • Part One: Starting Out with WordPress – Covers key decisions you should make before starting to use WordPress.
  • Part Two: Building a WordPress Blog – The blogging-on-WordPress basics are presented here. But: “Even if you’re planning something more exotic than JAWB (Just Another WordPress Blog, don’t skip this section,” the author urges. “The key skills you’ll learn here also underpin custom sites, like the kind you’ll learn to build in Part Four of the book.”
  • Part Three: Supercharging Your Blog – Explains how to use plug-ins to add new features to your self-hosted blog site. Shows “how to put video, music, and photo galleries on any WordPress site. Covers “how to collaborate with a whole group of authors…and how to attract boatloads of web visitors….”
  • Part Four: From Blog to Website – Shows how to “take your WordPress skills beyond the blog and learn to craft a custom website” with WordPress at its heart.
  • Part Five: Appendices – Appendix A “explains how to take a website you created on a free WordPress.com hosting service and move it to another web host to get more features.” Appendix B, meanwhile, gathers up the “useful web links” scattered throughout the book and puts them into one place organized by chapter. A link also is provided where this collection of links can be downloaded.

How popular is WordPress? It is, according to MacDonald, “ridiculously popular…stunningly popular…responsible for roughly one-sixth of the world’s websites….And one out of every five new sites runs on WordPress….”

If you choose to go the WordPress route, be sure you have WordPress: The Missing Manual with you.

Si Dunn

Learning Node – A good how-to guide for server-side Web development with Node.js – #programming #bookreview

Learning Node
Shelley Powers
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

 “Node is designed to be used for [server-side] applications that are heavy on input/output (I/O), but light on computation,” veteran Web technology author Shelley Powers notes in Learning Node, her ninth and newest how-to book from O’Reilly.

“Node.js,” she explains, “is a server-side technology that’s based on Google’s V8 JavaScript engine. It’s a highly scalable system that uses asynchronous, event-driven I/O (input/output), rather than threads or separate processes. “It’s ideal for web applications that are frequently accessed but computationally simple.”

I’ve criticized some previous Node books (1) for assuming that all of their readers know a lot about Node.js and assorted programming languages and (2) for not giving enough step-by-step installation and start-up information.

Happily, Learning Node is well written, nicely illustrated with code samples and screen shots, and assumes only that you have some working familiarity with JavaScript. It gives a detailed overview of how to set up development environments in Linux (Ubuntu) and Windows 7. “Installation on a Mac should be similar to installation on Linux,” the author adds.

One caveat regarding code examples: “Most were tested in a Linux environment, but should work, as is, in any Node environment.”

The 374-page book has 16 chapters. The first five “cover both getting Node and the package manager (npm) installed , how to use them, creating your first applications, and utilizing modules.”

Shelley Powers notes that she incorporates “the use of the Express framework, which also utilizes the Connect middleware, throughout the book.” So if you have little or no experience with Express, you will need to pay attention to chapters 6 through 8. But: “After these foundation chapters, you can skip around a bit,” she adds.

Some of the additional chapters cover key/value pairs, using MongoDb with Node, and working with Node’s relational database bindings.

Two chapters get into specialized application use. “Chapter 12 focuses purely on graphics and media access, including how to provide media for the new HTML5 video element, as well as working with PDF documents and Canvas,” the author points out. “Chapter 13 covers the very popular Sockets.io module, especially for working with the new web socket functionality.”

The final chapters are crucial, particularly if you want to move from learning Node to working in a production environment. Chapter 14 covers “Testing and Debugging Node Applications.” Chapter 15 “covers issues of security and authority…it is essential that you spend time in this chapter before you roll a Node application out for general use.”

Meanwhile, Chapter 16 describes “how to prepare your application for production use, including how to deploy your Node application not only on your own system , but also in one of the cloud servers that are popping up to host Node applications.”

Learning Node is both an excellent overall introduction to Node.js and a how-to reference guide that you will want to keep close at hand as you develop and deploy Node applications.

Si Dunn

For more information: Node.js, paperback, Kindle

Learning PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, and CSS, 2nd Edition – Dynamic websites #programming #bookreview

Learning PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, and CSS, 2nd Edition
Robin Nixon
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

Robin Nixon recently has updated and expanded his popular 2009 “step-by-step guide to creating dynamic websites.” The new edition has an added section that focuses on Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), so the book “now covers all four of the most popular web development technologies.”

Nixon notes: “The real beauty of PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, and CSS is the way in which they all work together to produce dynamic web content: PHP handles the main work on the web server, MySQL manages all of the data, and the combination of CSS and JavaScript looks after web page presentation. JavaScript can also talk with your PHP code on the web server whenever it needs to update something (either on the server or on the web page).”

The book’s opening chapters introduce (1) what dynamic web content means and (2) how to set up a development server on your Windows PC, Mac, or Linux machine. After that, Learning PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, & CSS, 2nd Edition follows the structure outlined by its title. First, you get a five-chapter tutorial on PHP programming. Then, two chapters show how to use MySQL. One additional chapter shows how to access MySQL using PHP, and two related chapters deal with (1) form handling and (2) cookies, sessions and authentication, using PHP and MySQL.

Three chapters introduce JavaScript programming. A fourth chapter covers “JavaScript and PHP Validation and Error Handling.” And one additional chapter describes “how to implement Ajax using JavaScript.”

Ajax, Nixon explains, “not only substantially reduces the amount of data that must be sent back and forth [between a browser and a server] but also makes web pages seamlessly dynamic, allowing them to behave more like self-contained applications.”

CSS gets its turn next, with an introductory chapter, a chapter on advanced CSS with CSS3, and a chapter on accessing CSS from JavaScript.

Finally, in the “Bringing It All Together” chapter, Nixon shows how to build a simple social networking site, using all of the tools introduced in the book.

Learning PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, & CSS, 2nd Edition is an excellent how-to guide for web development beginners who have moderate computer skills and a little bit of experience with HTML and static web pages. The book is nicely written and well-illustrated, and the code examples generally are easy to follow. Screen shots and other descriptions of expected results also can help keep you moving forward on the right path.

No book can cover everything you need to know, of course, particularly when several different types of software are involved. You may need occasional help from someone who has used one or more of the described programs. And some of the screen examples may appear a bit different on your machine as new software updates are released. But Robin Nixon’s updated edition can take you a long way toward the goal of learning how to design, create, post, and maintain dynamic web pages, using free, open source tools.

Si Dunn

PHP & MySQL: Novice to Ninja, 5th Ed. – A popular how-to guide updated – #bookreview #in #php #programming

PHP & MySQL: Novice to Ninja, 5th Edition
Kevin Yank
(SitePoint,
paperback, list price $39.95; Kindle edition, list price $29.95)

A key measure of a programming book’s usefulness and popularity is how many times it has been revised and reprinted.

Kevin Yank’s book first was published in 2001 under a different title. Eleven years later, his newly revised fifth edition is now in print and providing up-to-date hands-on guidance for those who want to use PHP and MySQL to create database-driven websites.  (By some estimates, at least 20 million websites worldwide now use PHP.)

Yank points out that “PHP is a server-side scripting language that lets you insert instructions into your web pages that your web server software (in most cases, Apache) will execute before it sends those pages to browsers that request them.”

Meanwhile, “[a] database server (in our case MySQL) is a program that can store large amounts of information in an organized format that’s easily accessible through programming languages like PHP. For example, you could tell PHP to look in the database for a list of jokes that you’d like to appear on your website.”

Yank’s fifth edition shows you how to use PHP to create a working content management system (CMS) that accesses – no surprise here – an online joke database that’s managed with MySQL. (Of course, if you think a simple joke database is lame, you can always modify a few tables and labels and create something more substantial, such as a database of vegetables you hate or celebrities or politicians you consider utterly irrelevant to your life.) 

Building a joke database (or whatever) is a pleasant way to learn the basics of PHP coding and database design and then quickly start improving your knowledge and skills as the CMS project is expanded and given more capabilities.

Yank’s book has 12 chapters and four appendices. The how-to chapters are split into short paragraphs, with numerous short code examples. A link is provided where the book’s code examples can be downloaded in a ZIP archive. And the book’s text is written in a smooth, approachable style.

PHP & MySQL: Novice to Ninja, 5th Edition is “aimed at intermediate and advanced web designers looking to make the leap into server-side programming,” Yank says. He expects readers to be familiar with “simple HTML” but “[n]o knowledge of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) or JavaScript is assumed or required.”

He adds, however, “if you do know JavaScript, you’ll find it will make learning PHP a breeze, since these languages are quite similar.”

Si Dunn

Node: Up and Running – A fine intro to Node.js, the new 799-pound gorilla in the room – #programming #bookreview #in

Node: Up and Running
Tom Hughes-Croucher and Mike Wilson
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $34.99; Kindle edition, list price $27.99)

Node.js is often described as “the dominant player” in the world of server-side JavaScript development. Whether that’s completely true or boastful hype, big players such as Google, LinkedIn, eBay, Walmart and Microsoft now are using it. And so are countless smaller players and startups. If Node.js is not yet King Kong, it has at least grown into a 799-pound, but reasonably tame, programming gorilla for those who want to write scalable server-side code using JavaScript.

In today’s weird, challenging job market for programmers, it would not hurt you to feed this new gorilla a few bananas and gain at least passing familiarity with it. You never know when you may need to ramp up some Node.js skills in a hurry, to get or keep a job or land a contract.

I like O’Reilly’s “Up and Running” book series for that very ramp-up reason. They do a good job of introducing a programming language and showing how to use key aspects of it. And they point you to additional resources for skills and knowledge you can pick up on the fly.

According to the two authors of Node: Up and Running,“Node.js is many things, but mostly it’s a way of running JavaScript outside the web browser.” They add: “Many people use the JavaScript programming language extensively for programming the interfaces of websites. Node.js allows this popular programming language to be applied in many more contexts, in particular on web servers. There are several notable features about Node.js that make it worthy of interest.”

For example: “Node is a wrapper around the high-performance V8 JavaScript runtime from the Google Chrome browser. Node tunes V8 to work better in contexts other than the browser, mostly by providing additional APIs that are optimized for specific use cases.”

The two authors point out that “JavaScript is an event-driven language, and Node uses this to its advantage to produce highly scalable servers. Using an architecture called an event loop, Node makes programming highly scalable servers both easy and safe.” Node.js also features non-blocking I/O.

Node.js “runs on Windows, Linux, Mac, and other POSIX OSes (such as Solaris and BSD),” the authors state. And this is the second Node book I’ve reviewed that claims the installation process is “extremely simple.” The previous book did not give enough information for beginners. This one follows “extremely simple” with instructions and screen displays spread across nearly four pages. But – a hurried beginner may miss this at first – the steps are only for those who choose to do a source install rather than use one of the Node.js installer links.

The first time I used a Windows link to install Node.js (trying to follow the previous book), I somehow ended up with stuff scattered and duplicated in several subdirectories  –. an “extremely simple” mess.)  This time, my installation did seem “simple,” if not quite “extremely simple.” (Once it completed, I had to go to a command prompt and run “node” rather than just click on a brand new Windows icon — my definition of “extremely simple.” )

Of course, you are expected to have some JavaScript knowledge and programming experience before tackling this book, so you may not want to get ahead of yourself on the learning curve. If you’re currently a JavaScript novice, put this one on the shelf for a little bit later. But definitely get it.

Node: Up and Running offers plenty of code examples, and the paragraphs between them are well-written and kept reasonably short. Thus, knowledge and skills can be gained in manageable small chunks. Only a few other illustrations are offered, and, unfortunately, they tend to be more goofy than helpful.

The 184-page book has eight chapters:

  1. A Very Brief Introduction to Node.js
  2. Doing Interesting Things
  3. Building Robust Node Applications
  4. Core APIs
  5. Helper APIs
  6. Data Access
  7. Important External Modules
  8. Extending Node

Some readers have noted that this book does not contain the traditional appendix giving links and referrals to other sources of more information on Node.js, and that’s a fair criticism. However, the book’s Chapter 6, “Data Access,” does have links to, and discussions of, “the basic ways to connect to common open source database choices and to store and retrieve data.” The topics covered include using Node.js with CouchDb, Redis, MongoDB and relational databases such as MySQL and PostgreSQL. The chapter also looks at connection pooling and message queuing (MQ) protocol.

“The Node project is still very young,” the two authors state, “and yet rarely have we seen such fervor around a project. Both novices and experts have coalesced around the project to use and contribute to Node, making it both a pleasure to explore and a supportive place to share and get advice.”

Their new book, Node: Up and Running, can help you get friendly fast with this new 799-pound gorilla in the room, Node.js.

– Si Dunn

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MySQL Troubleshooting – Tools, steps & advice from an expert – #bookreview

MySQL Troubleshooting
By Sveta Smirnova
(O’Reilly,
paperback, list price $29.99; Kindle edition, list price $14.99)

Sveta Smirnova knows how to find and fix MySQL problems. She is a principal technical support engineer in Oracle’s Bug Analysis Support Group and works daily with MySQL support issues and bug fixes.

Her new book is structured to help both MySQL beginners and those with more advanced skills, and it has been reviewed, prior to publication, by several other MySQL experts.

This well-written how-to guide likely will become a must-have reference book for many MySQL database administrators and support staff, as well as those currently learning MySQL. It contains numerous code examples, log excerpts and other illustrations, plus tips gleaned from long experience at solving a wide array of MySQL issues.

MySQL Troubleshooting has seven chapters:

  • Chapter 1, Basics – Basic troubleshooting techniques
  • Chapter 2, You Are Not Alone: Concurrency Issues – Problems that can occur “when applications run in multiple threads or interfere with transactions in other applications.”
  • Chapter 3, Effects of Server Options – A two-part chapter: (1) How to find and fix problems caused by configuration options; and (2) recommendations on how to solve and test configuration issues.  
  • Chapter 4, MySQL’s Environment – Deals with hardware and server environments. Lists “some points a MySQL database administrator (DBA) must look into.”
  • Chapter 5, Troubleshooting Replication – When slaves lag far behind the master, and related issues.
  • Chapter 6, Troubleshooting Techniques and Tools – Describes “extra techniques and tools” not discussed in earlier chapters.
  • Chapter 7, Best Practices – Focuses on “good habits and behaviors for safe and effective troubleshooting.”

An appendix titled “Information Resources” offers a number of websites and books that the author deems “good sources of information that can help during troubleshooting.”

She notes that MySQL now has “many forks” and acknowledges that her book cannot cover everything, nor “describe servers I don’t work with daily.” For example, she skips over Percona server and MariaDB but says “most of the methods described here” can be used except when “dealing with a particular feature added in the fork,” which will require product-specific information.

She also does not cover MySQL Cluster problems. Issues “specific to MySQL Cluster need separate MySQL Cluster knowledge that I don’t describe here,” she writes.

“But I do devote a lot of space to MyISAM- and InnoDB-specific problems…because they are by far the most popular storage engines, and their installation base is huge.”

A few of her code examples use PHP. But the C API is used “to illustrate the functions discussed in this book. The choice wasn’t easy,” she notes, “because there are a lot of programming APIs for MySQL in various languages.” And covering them all is impossible, she adds.

For many who work with MySQL, MySQL Troubleshooting can help solve or prevent a wide range of  problems, from easily overlooked syntax glitches to complex issues involving configuration, replication or multiple threads. And even if she doesn’t specifically cover your “fork” of MySQL, many of her tips, techniques, and examples can be adapted and put to good use in your own support and troubleshooting efforts.

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir available now in paperback. He is the author of a detective novel, Erwin’s Law, a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.