Looking anew at the intense feud between leaders of the Texas Republic’s Navy & Army – #bookreview

To the People of Texas
An Appeal: In Vindication of His Conduct of the Navy

By Commodore Edwin W. Moore, T.N., edited with an introduction by Jonathan W. Jordan
(DeGolyer Library, hardback, list price $60.00 plus applicable sales tax and $5.00 shipping)

A friend who knows that I enjoy naval histories recently sent me a copy of this intriguing but somewhat expensive book.

It was published last summer, yet it is still new enough and important enough to view as a “new” book worthy of wide consideration. It is a 2011 reprint of Commodore Edwin W. Moore’s 1843 defense of his conduct and strategies as leader of the Texas Navy. Only a few copies of Moore’s original manifesto remain in existence, mostly in rare book collections. So this is a welcome event for those who relish works of history related to the Republic of Texas, before it became a state, or rely on them for academic and artistic research.

The first two sentences of editor Jonathan W. Jordan’s well-written introduction go right to the heart of reason why Commodore Moore felt compelled to defend himself for more than 200 pages in his original book:

“Within four years of assuming his post, the Texas Republic’s greatest naval commander became the mortal enemy of its greatest army commander. The hatred that burned between Commodore Edwin Ward Moore and President Sam Houston would fuel a fifteen-year war of charges, insults, and invitations to duel that would corrupt the reputations of both Texas patriots before the U.S. Senate, the Texas Congress, and the peoples of two republics.”

Indeed, Jordan notes, “Their bitterness would endure to the end of both men’s days, far beyond the life of the frontier republic, and would shape the historical legacies of Moore, Houston, and the Texas Navy.”

What created this intense hatred between two essential military leaders? According to Jordan: “Judged from the words and deeds of the antagonists, the acrimony appears to have been a hybrid flower born of three toxic seeds: a divergence over what Texas should become; differences in strategy; and the age-old reality that army generals do not always grasp the best uses of naval power.”

Along with being a “vindication,” letters from and to Commodore Moore within the book give a fascinating look at life and politics within the upper levels of the Texas Navy.

For example, in one letter written on May 7, 1842, to George W. Hockley, Texas’ Secretary of War and Marine, Commodore Moore reported that “nearly every officer in the Navy has tendered his resignation to-day—the reasons assigned, are, that they cannot get their pay, and as they owe a large amount, they must resort to other means of paying it.”

That same day, Commodore Moore wrote another letter to Secretary Hockley reporting that he had just purchased the steamer Patrick Henry, adding: “…she is represented to me to be in a good running condition, and if she can be of any service to the Government to the westward, or any where else, the Government is welcome to the use of her, free of any charge, until I want her, which will not be for some time.”

Secretary Hockley responded to the first letter by telling Commodore Moore that “[t]he resignations of all who wish to leave the service, you will accept forthwith…”

And Commodore Moore responded by reporting that he had “advanced all my means, and used all my credit to sustain the Navy on repeated occasions, but each successive of the last three sessions of Congress have cramped it more and more until the officers have nearly despaired.”

He added that, based on existing promises of future pay and his own pleadings to his officers, “nearly all of them have withdrawn their resignations…” and agreed to serve their country longer without pay, even though “many of them at this time are without a decent pair of shoes….”

This fascinating work contains several pages of illustrations from the era, plus notes to the introduction, notes to the text and a select bibliography. Libraries, scholars, historians, lovers of Texas history and others should give special consideration to this important book.

The new DeGolyer edition can be purchased by sending $60.00 plus applicable sales tax, along with $5.00 shipping and handling, to:

 The DeGolyer Library
 Southern Methodist University
 P.O. Box 750396
 Dallas, TX  75275-0396

Include shipping information and make checks payable to “The DeGolyer Library.” The book’s publisher is “unable to accept credit cards.”

Si Dunn‘s latest book is a detective novel, Erwin’s Law. His other published works include Jump, a novella, and a book of poetry, plus several short stories, including The 7th Mars Cavalry, all available on Kindle. He is a freelance book reviewer and a former technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist.

The Life of Hon. William F. Cody, Known as Buffalo Bill – #bookreview

The Life of Hon. William F. Cody, Known as Buffalo Bill
By William F. Cody, edited and with an introduction by Frank Christianson
(University of Nebraska Press, paperback, list price $27.95)

“Buffalo Bill” Cody was one hell of a frontiersman and self-promoter, at a time when Americans were hungry for Wild West heroes.

William F. Cody published his part-fiction, part-true illustrated autobiography in 1879, at age 33, recounting his adventures (to that point) as an explorer, Indian fighter, buffalo hunter, Pony Express rider, temporary Medal of Honor winner, and theatrical entertainer.

This new reprint of Buffalo Bill’s book (the original version; others followed) has been edited and provided with a well-written introduction and three appendices by Frank Christianson, an associate professor of English at Brigham Young University. Christianson is author of Philanthropy in British and American Fiction: Dickens, Hawthorne, Eliot, and Howells. Twenty-six additional images and photographs related to Buffalo Bill also have been added.

One helpful feature of Christianson’s book is a chronology of William F. Cody’s event-filled and promotion-filled life. He was born in an Iowa farmhouse in 1846 and lived long enough to become a movie producer four years before his death in 1917.

Interestingly, William F. Cody”s autobiography made it to print just as his frontier career was ending and his career as a stage entertainer and promoter was taking off. Within four years, his “Buffalo Bill’s Wild West” show would be on its way to becoming, in Christianson’s words, “one of the most popular traveling exhibitions in entertainment history.” 

Christianson notes: “William Cody’s seventy-one years were a time of accelerating change in America, and he found himself in the midst of many of the era’s most defining events. Like the ever-shifting boundary of the American frontier, Cody’s life was characterized by frenetic movement.”

Christianson points out that “Cody, like his father, was an indefatigable entrepreneur” who tried his hand at many things, including unsuccessfully attempting to manage an inn and create a town, but succeeding as a buffalo hunter and military scout, two occupations which “had the most direct bearing upon his future celebrity.”

William F. Cody’s book and Frank Christianson’s expanding materials add up to some very entertaining and informative reading. Yes, Buffalo Bill left behind a legacy often based on self-interest and inflated images of life and events in the American West. But the Honorable William F. Cody also made, Christianson contends, “a valuable contribution to the records of our Western frontier history.”

Si Dunn‘s latest book is a detective novel, Erwin’s Law. His other published works include Jump, a novella, and a book of poetry, plus several short stories, including The 7th Mars Cavalry, all available on Kindle. He is a freelance book reviewer and a former technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist.

Mac Attack! Three new books for Macintosh users – #bookreview

No Starch Press and O’Reilly Media recently have released three new books aimed at Macintosh users.

One is for Mac newcomers. Another is for those who want to learn a lot more about the Mac OS X Lion operating system without having to read “tersely written” Apple help screens. And the third is for programmers who want “to build native Mac OS X applications with a sleek, developer-friendly  alternative to Objective-C….”

Taking it easy first…

Doing ‘Simple Projects’ with a Mac

My New Mac Lion Edition: Simple Projects to Get You Started
By Wallace Wang
(No Starch Press, paperback, list price $29.95 ; Kindle edition, list price $9.99)

If you are computer newbie or switching over from Windows or other operating systems, here is a good book to help you put your new Mac to work in a hurry.

My New Mac Lion Edition shows how to do practical stuff such as connecting to the Web, playing and burning CDs and DVDs, pulling digital photos off your camera so you can edit and share them, and working with the Mac’s security features.

Given today’s risky Internet and office computing environment, it might have been better to describe the security features much earlier in the book, well before the working-online chapters. But as a practical guide to learning and using the Mac’s key features, this 472-page how-to guide is written well and has plenty of illustrations and clear lists of steps. It even describes several ways to eject a stuck CD or DVD.

The 56 chapters are grouped into seven parts:

  • Part 1: Basic Training – Everything from using the mouse to opening apps.
  • Part 2: Wrangling Files and Folders – Finding files, storing files, sharing files.
  • Part 3: Making Life Easier – Shortcut commands, controls, updating software, saving and retrieving contact information, using appointment calendar, and typing in foreign languages.
  • Part 4: Playing Music and Movies – Playing audio CDs, ripping and burning audio CDs, playing a DVD, listening to online programs and free college lectures, and editing videos with iMovie.
  • Part 5: The Digital Shutterbug – Transferring, editing and displaying digital photographs.
  • Part 6: Surfing and Sharing on the Internet – Numerous things web and email, plus instant messaging with iChat.
  • Part 7: Maintaining Your Mac – Energy conservation, ejecting stuck CDs/DVDs, password protecting  your Mac, encrypting your data, and configuring your firewall.

The author, Wallace Wang, has written several best-selling computer books. He’s also an ongoing career as a standup comic.

More IS Better: What to Do with 50+ Programs and 250 New Features

Mac OS X Lion: The Missing Manual
By David Pogue
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $34.99)

David Pogue created the popular Missing Manual series, and the New York Times technology columnist definitely knows how to put together a good how-to book.

His 909-page Mac OS X Lion: The Missing Manual is exactly what you need to become (over time and with diligent effort, of course) a Mac power user. It’s also what you need if you’d rather settle for being a well-informed user who likes having a handy source  for looking up information about a Mac feature or program.

In this book, you begin well beneath the “Hello, World!” level by learning to say “oh-ess-ten,” not “oh-ess-ex.” Once you master that, you get to move into “The New Lion Landscape,” where you are informed that “Apple’s overarching design philosophy in creating Mac OS X was: ‘Make it more like an iPad.'”

Then, you quickly learn how to use “Full Screen Mode, Safari” and “Full Screen Apps, Mission Control.” And, by the way, you are still officially in Chapter 0 at this point (that’s “zero,” not “oh”).

Pogue’s book is smoothly written. (You don’t, after all, just luck into writing for the Times.) It has a good array of screenshots and other illustrations. And it offers plenty of tips and notes amid the instructional paragraphs.

The book’s six parts (with seven chapters each) are focused as follows:

  • Part 1: The Mac OS X Desktop – “[C]overs everything you see on the screen when you turn on a Mac OS X computer….”
  • Part 2: Programs in Mac OS X – Describes “how to launch them, switch among them, swap data between them, use them to create and open files, and control them using the AppleScript and Automator automation tools.”
  • Part 3: The Components of Mac OS X – “[A]n item-by-item discussion of the individual software nuggets that make up this operating system–the 29 panels of System Preferences and the 50-some programs in your Applications and Utilities folders.”
  • Part 4: The Technologies of Mac OS X – “Networking, file sharing, and screen sharing…” plus “fonts, printing, graphics, handwriting recognition…sound, speech, movies…” and even some looks at how to use “Mac OS X’s Unix underpinnings.”
  • Part 5: Mac OS X Online – “[C]overs all of the Internet features of Mac OS X.” Everything from email to chatting to working in the cloud, and even “connecting to, and controlling, your Mac from across the wires — FTP, SSH, VPN, and so on.”
  • Part 6: Appendixes – These include a Windows-to-Mac dictionary (for Windows refugees), information on installing Mac OS X, troubleshooting information, and “a thorough master list of all the keyboard shortcuts and trackpad/mouse gestures in Lion.”

If you’re serious about using your Mac and weary of opening endless not-so-helpful help screens, you should seriously consider owning this book.

A Programmer’s Guide to MacRuby

MacRuby: The Definitive Guide
By Matt Aimonetti
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $39.99; Kindle edition, list price $31.99)

“MacRuby,” the author says, “is Apple’s implementation of the Ruby programming language on top of the Objective-C technology stack.”

His book is a straightforward, no-nonsense guide intended to show developers how “to write native applications for the Cocoa environment using the popular Ruby syntax as well as the well-known and robust Objective-C and C libraries.”

He declares his work “neither a Ruby book nor a Cocoa book,” but states that “it should provide you with enough information to understand the MacRuby environment and create rich applications for the OS X platform.”

MacRuby: The Definitive Guide is segmented into two major parts. Part 1 (“MacRuby Overview”) introduces MacRuby, including what it is, how it’s installed, how it works, what you can do with it, and how it relates to what you already probably know. Part 2 (titled “MacRuby in Practice”)  “covers concrete examples of applications you might want to develop in MacRuby.”

Using short, concise code examples, Matt Aimonetti helps the reader dive straight into MacRuby, beginning at the classic “Hello, World!” entry point, with a little twist.

In just 35 lines of code, you learn how to build a graphical user interface (GUI) application that displays the words “MacRuby: The Definitive Guide” in a window with a button. The window shows “Hello World!” within a box, and your computer speaks “Hello, world!” when you click on the button.

The first eight chapters focus on topics such as: introduction, fundamentals, foundation, application kit, Xcode, core data, and getting deeper into the process of “developing complex apps.”

The topics of the final five chapters are: (1) creating an Address Book example; (2) creating an application that “uses the user’s geographical location and a location web service”; (3) using MacRuby in Objective-C projects; (4) using Objective-C code in MacRuby apps; and (5) using Ruby third-party libraries. 

Before reading this book and tackling the code, the author recommends having some programming experience and basic familiarity with object-oriented programming. You also should get a basic overview of the Ruby language by visiting its main website.

Si Dunn 

Droid X2: The Missing Manual – #droid #bookreview

Droid X2: The Missing Manual
By Preston Gralla
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $19.99; Kindle edition, list price $9.99)

Got, getting or giving a Droid X2 smartphone?

Consider adding this useful how-to manual to the mix. Droid X2: The Missing Manual bills itself as “The book that should have been in the box.” But it’s likely much bigger than the phone’s box.

The 399-page manual, written by veteran technology writer Preston Gralla, is nicely structured, well-illustrated and chock full of information on using the Droid X2’s many features. The book is organized into six parts.

 Part 1 covers “Android Basics.” It gives a guided tour of features and shows how to make calls, do text messages, manage contacts, use Caller ID, make conference calls, and handle other tasks.

Part 2 focuses on “Camera, Pix, Music, and Video” and how you can use a Droid X2 to take photographs, play and manage music, and record, edit and view videos.

Part 3, “Maps, Apps, and Calendar,” shows “how to navigate using a GPS, to find any location in the world with maps, to find your own location on a map, to get weather and news, to use a great calendar app, and to synchronize that calendar with your Google calendar, or even an Outlook calendar,” Gralla writes.

Part 4, “Android Online,” discusses “everything you need to know about the Droid X2’s remarkable online talents.” This includes getting online over Verizon’s network or a wi-fi hotspot, using your Droid X2 as a portable G3 hotspot, checking email, surfing the Internet and downloading and using apps.

Part 5 covers “Advanced Topics,” including syncing and transferring files between a Droid X2 and a Mac or a PC, using your voice to control your Droid, and using your Droid at your workplace. Part 5 also includes a nice listing of Droid X2 settings.

Part 6, “Appendixes,” has three “reference chapters” showing how to activate a Droid X2, which accessories are available, and how to troubleshoot various issues.

This “Missing Manual” includes a link to a website where you can keep up with updates and changes to the Droid X2, plus corrections to the book.

Meanwhile, a “Missing CD” web page link provided in the book gives clickable links to the websites that are mentioned in the text.

Many new users of the Droid X2 likely will find this book helpful. So will experienced users who have mostly focused on voice calls and text messages and now want to master some of their smartphone’s other features. 

Si Dunn

QuickBooks 2012: The Missing Manual – Solid Focus on Pro Edition – #bookreview

QuickBooks 2012: The Missing Manual
By Bonnie Biafore
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $34.99; Kindle, list price, $27.99)

 In late September, Intuit released the 2012 versions of its popular QuickBooks financial software. Just a month later, O’Reilly Media was hot on Intuit’s heels with QuickBooks 2012: The Missing Manual, a new entry in O’Reilly’s popular “The book that should have been in the box®” series.

Written by veteran author and project management consultant Bonnie Biafore, this new guidebook provides clear, well-illustrated, step-by-step instructions on how to use the Windows edition of QuickBooks 2012 Pro, the most popular version of Intuit’s product, particularly in small businesses.

The 734-page book also gives some basic how-to information and advice on accounting – enough to get you past some confusing stumbling blocks as you set up a business and its accounts, but not enough to substitute for real training in accounting and keeping books.

“QuickBooks isn’t hard to learn,” the author says. “Many of the features that you’re familiar with from other programs work just the same way in QuickBooks—windows, dialog boxes, drop-down lists, and keyboard shortcuts, to name a few. And with each new version, Intuit has added enhancements and new features to make your workflow smoother and faster. The challenge is knowing what to do according to accounting rules, and how to do it in QuickBooks.”

Two words of caution: This book does not cover non-USA versions of QuickBooks 2012 Pro. And, the author points out, “QuickBooks for Mac differs significantly from the Windows version, and unfortunately you won’t find help with the Mac version of the program in this book.”

QuickBooks 2012: The Missing Manual is divided into five parts containing a total of 26 chapters and two appendices.

Part One covers “Getting Started.” It starts with “Creating a Company File” and “Getting Around in QuickBooks” and advances to setting up accounts, customers, jobs, vendors, items, lists, and managing QuickBooks files.

Part Two’s focus is “Bookkeeping,” and its chapters covers everything from tracking mileage to paying for expenses, invoicing, managing accounts receivable, generating financial statements and performing end-of-year tasks.

“Managing Your Business” is the focus of Part Three. The chapters cover managing inventory, budgeting and planning, and working with reports.

“QuickBooks Power” is the title of Part Four. It covers using QuickBooks with online banking services, configuring preferences in QuickBooks to fit your company, integrating QuickBooks with other programs (Excel integration has been improved in QB 2012), customizing QuickBooks, and keeping QuickBooks data secure.

Part Five contains two appendices: “Installing QuickBooks” and “Help, Support, and Other Resources.”

The book does not contain a CD, but it provides a link where “every single Web address, practice file, and piece of downloadable software mentioned In this book is available….”

QuickBooks 2012 Pro, according to the author, “is the workhorse edition” of a software package that is available “in a gamut of editions, offering options for organizations at both ends of the small-business spectrum.”

Her book is good enough that it can help you get a small business set up and off the ground while you are learning the QuickBooks 2012 Pro. But if you don’t have some solid background in bookkeeping and accounting, do not try to rely on the software alone to save you. Get the training any way you can, as soon as you can. And then, once you can afford it, hire good people to help you with the bookkeeping and accounting, while you focus on the bigger picture, using QuickBooks 2012’s budgeting, planning, forecast, report, contact synchronization, lead tracking, and to-do list features.

One other caution: QuickBooks has a specialized edition specifically for nonprofit organizations. It is more expensive than the Pro package. So some people try to save money and use the Pro package to manage a small nonprofit. But there can be confusions involving some of the terminology, transactions and reports. In this book, Bonnie Biafore provides “notes and tips about tracking nonprofit finances with QuickBooks Pro (or plain QuickBooks Premier)” and modifying the program’s standard reports to meet government requirements.

By the way, QuickBooks 2012: The Missing Manual can be used to learn features in earlier versions of QuickBooks. Of course, doing so and seeing what’s missing may convince you to upgrade.

Si Dunn

Treasure Hunter by W.C. Jameson – A memoir that’s a treasure itself – #nonfiction #bookreview

Treasure Hunter
By W.C. Jameson
(Seven Oaks Publishing, paperback, list price $14.95; Kindle, $2.99)

We’ve all had the great fantasy. We turn over a spade of dirt while doing some yard work and suddenly uncover Spanish doubloons or a rich cache of 19th-century silver dollars or some long-lost loot buried by a famous outlaw.

W.C. Jameson’s name is now virtually synonymous with “buried treasure.” Of his 70-plus published books, more than 20 of them are focused on treasure hunting, lost treasures and lost mines in the United States and North America.

Jameson’s huge and diverse literary output includes books of poetry, plus books on outlaws, cooking and even writing itself. Yet many of his fans think of him as a master treasure hunter first.

His newest book, Treasure Hunter, is a treasure in itself: an adventure-packed memoir that recounts and reflects upon his five-plus decades of expeditions – sometimes successful, sometimes disastrous – to find and recover long-lost gold and silver artifacts.

In treasure hunting, Jameson points out, if the rattlesnakes, rock slides and cave-ins don’t get you, state and federal laws and private landowners likely will, especially if you don’t keep stay completely quiet about what you are doing and what you have found.

Indeed, he stresses, “Anonymity is a great ally for a professional treasure hunter.”

So, before you quit your office job, cash in your 401(K), dress up like Indiana Jones, and head off for the mountains or desert, Jameson urges you to plant some harsh realities very firmly in mind:

“It is important to understand that almost everything treasure recovery professionals do is illegal,” he warns. “Thus, the bizarre and unreasonable laws related to treasure recovery have turned honest, dedicated, and hard-working fortune hunters into outlaws. Announcing a discovery often leads to negative and unwanted developments, primarily the loss of any treasure that may have been found. As mentors explained to me years ago, the fewer people involved, the better. Silence is the byword.” 

Throughout most of his fortune hunting career, Jameson has worked only with a small group of partners, none of them identified in this book, except with names such as “Poet” and “Slade” and “Stanley.”

At one point in Treasure Hunter, after a complicated expedition ends in disaster and near-death experiences, “Poet” sums up the “glamour” of their many quests:

“This little trip reminds me of most of our expeditions. Lots of action, nothing goes as planned, we get shot at, and we come back empty-handed.”

But Jameson has had some successes in his long and often arduous career: “From a few of these excursions, my partners and I acquired enough wealth to pay off houses and purchase new vehicles. With some of the money, I paid college tuition for myself as well as for my children.”

And, despite his long career and advancing age, he remains “on the hunt” for more treasures, he says.

Not surprisingly, Jameson identifies library research as one of the toughest and most essential parts of treasure hunting. And the lands around certain “lost” treasures may be accessible only after paying bribes, dealing with unsavory characters, surviving potentially fatal double-crosses, dodging deadly snakes and being willing to risk cross-border smuggling.

If that sounds like exciting “adventure” to you, pay close attention to Jameson’s additional cautions:   

“The truth is,” he writes, “adventure was never an objective, merely a byproduct. Anyone who has ever been on a quest will tell you that adventure happens when plans go awry. The great explorer Roald Amundson once said, ‘An adventure is merely  an interruption of an explorer’s serious work and indicates bad planning.’ Our plans often turned out badly, which may give you some idea of our collective ability to arrange and organize a perfect expedition, to prepare for any and all contingencies.”

For some readers, the many quests described in Jameson’s book likely will fuel or refuel a passion to go out anyway and search and dig for riches. But, for many others of us, some of the armchair adventurers of the world, his book will provide entertaining hours of safe reading, absorbing escapism and comfortable daydreaming.

And that will be treasure enough.

Si Dunn

Revolution in the Valley: How the Mac Was Made (2nd Revised Edition) – #bookreview #macintosh

Revolution in the Valley: The Insanely Great Story of How the Mac Was Made
By Andy Hertzfeld
(O’Reilly Media, list price $24.99, paperback)

My wife swears by her Mac. I, however, just swear at it when I am forced to use it.

I have been using anything-but-Apple computers since the early 1980s, starting with a Sinclair ZX80 and moving up through a ragged assortment of Trash-80s, Osbornes,  Kaypros, PC-XTs, PC-ATs, and PCs that run Windows 7.

During a short semi-career in specialized hardware and software development, I tested programs that ran exclusively on machines running Windows. So I have that bias.

Nonetheless, Andy Hertzfeld’s book, Revolution in the Valley: The Insanely Great Story of How the Mac Was Made, is fascinating and entertaining reading, even for those of us who have avoided Apple computers and sometimes still bristle at the smug, superior attitudes exhibited by many Macintosh users. (Don’t tell my wife I said that.)

Hertzfeld was one of the main authors of the Macintosh system software, including the User Interface Toolbox and many of the Mac’s original desk accessories. He later joined Google and is one of the primary creators of Google +.

Originally published in 2004, Revolution in the Valley recently has been brought back into print again by O’Reilly Media as a second revised edition.

The book is drawn mainly from Hertzfeld’s adventures, misadventures, reflections and perspectives. But it is not All Hertzfeld All the Time. Refreshingly, it also includes stories written by “other key original Mac team members”—Steve Capps, Donn Denman, Bruce Horn and Susan Kare.

Their stories recount the chaotically creative and frequently high-pressured race to design and deliver “an easy-to-use, low-cost, consumer-oriented computer…featuring a revolutionary graphical user interface (GUI).”

Hertzfeld and his co-contributors focus on “the development of the original Macintosh computer, from its inception in the summer of 1979, through its triumphant introduction in January 1984, until May 31, 1985, when Steve Jobs was forced off the Macintosh team.

Revolution in the Valley is divided into five parts and follows a somewhat chronological path. However, it makes frequent and refreshing use of short anecdotes that are easy and enjoyable to read, no matter what your computer bias might be. It also has a nice assortment of photographs, drawings, screenshots and other illustrations from the development period.

Speaking (again) of smug attitudes, one amusing incident in the book involves the Macintosh team’s April 1981 encounter at a computer show with Adam Osborne, creator of the Osborne 1, “a low-cost, one-piece, portable computer complete with a suite of bundled applications.”

According to Hertzfeld: “As Macintosh elitists, we were suitably grossed out by the character-based CP/M applications, which seemed especially clumsy on the tiny, scrolling screen.” When Osborne realized he was talking to the Macintosh development team, he told them his Osborne 1 would outsell the Apple II “by a factor of 10” and added that they should “tell Steve Jobs that the Osborne 1 is going to outsell the Apple II and the Macintosh combined!”

When Steve Jobs heard what Adam Osborne had said, he called the founder of the Osborne Computer Company and left two messages. The first message was simple and basic, that Osborne was “an asshole.” Jobs’ second message was: “Tell him the Macintosh is so good that he’s probably going to buy a few for his children even though it put his company out of business.”

And the rest, of course, is computer history.

Revolution in the Valley has drawn strong praise from Steve Wozniak, who co-founded Apple with Steve Jobs in 1976.

“It’s chilling to recall how this cast of young and inexperienced people who cared more than anything about doing great things created what is perhaps the key technology of our lives,” he notes in the book’s foreword. “ Their own words and images take me back to those rare days when the rules of innovation were guided by internal rewards, and not by money.”

Si Dunn