Learning Unix for OS X Mountain Lion – Working with the Terminal and Shell – #bookreview

Learning Unix for OS X Mountain Lion
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

 When I showed this book–and its “Going Deep with the Terminal and Shell”–tagline to my Mac-centric wife, her first response was: “Why?”

Her Macintosh, she declared, already does everything she needs it to do, with no fuss. Why bother with terminals and shells–and Unix?

I, on the other hand, started working with computers back in the days when everything was done at the command line, programs and data were stored on recording tape, and 48K of RAM was stunning state of the art.

So I am happy with Dave Taylor’s observation in his new book that “there are over a thousand Unix commands included with OS X—and you can’t see most of them without accessing the command line. From sophisticated software development environments to web browsers, file transfer utilities to encryption and compression utilities, almost everything you can do in the Aqua interface—and more—can be done with a few carefully chosen Unix commands.”

Indeed, he notes, “…dipping into the primarily text-based Unix tools on your OS X system gives you more power and control over both your computer and your computing environment.”

He lists some other, enticing reasons to learn and use the Unix tools available in OS X. There are, for example, “thousands of open source and otherwise freely downloadable Unix applications,” including the GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) that is a convenient and affordable alternative to Adobe Photoshop.

“Fundamentally,” he says, “Unix is all about power and control.”

My wife is still not convinced having this power and control is necessary or important to  how she uses her Mac. But I predict many others will want to get this book.

It is an excellent how-to guide, with 214 pages organized into 10 chapters:

  • 1. Why Use Unix?
  • 2. Using the Terminal’
  • 3. Exploring the File System
  • 4. File Management
  • 5. Finding Files and Information
  • 6. Redirecting I/O
  • 7. Multitasking
  • 8. Taking Unix Online
  • 9. Of Windows and X11
  • 10. Where to Go from Here

Learning Unix for OS X Mountain Lion is well written and nicely illustrated with step-by-step Unix command examples, results displays, screen shots, and tips. It doesn’t try to cover everything, nor get too deep into detail.

Dave Taylor’s new book comfortably meets its goal of showing savvy OS X users how to use “all the basic commands you need to get started with Unix.”

There is, he points out, “a whole world of Unix inside your OS X system, and it’s time for you to jump in and learn how to be more productive and more efficient, and gain remarkable power as a Mac user.”

Si Dunn

Learning Unix for OS X Mountain Lion
For more information: paperbackKindle

Switching to the Mac, Mountain Lion Edition – David Pogue scores again – #bookreview

Switching to the Mac: Mountain Lion Edition
David Pogue
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

David Pogue will have to pry Windows PCs out of my cold, dead fingers.

That being said, his new book makes a very compelling case for why you other Windows users should switch from PCs to Macs right away.

As I’ve previously noted, I use three battle-scarred Windows PCs during a typical work day. Yet sometimes (don’t ask why), I am forced – forced, I tell you – to use my wife’s Macintosh, too.

Frankly, I have hated Macs for a long, long time. No, actually, I have hated the smug, “Everything’s milk and honey on a Mac!” attitude that peppy-preppy Mac users (my wife excluded) seem to radiate each time they get around us gray-haired Windows types.

I happen to think the Blue Screen of Death is a lovely work of art, easily on par with Thomas Gainsborough’s The Blue Boy and Edvard Munch’s The Scream, thank you very much. And what is life without the daily excitement of battling evil spyware and sinister viruses from Eastern Europe?

Seriously, I continue to be a huge fan of New York Times tech columnist David Pogue and “The Missing Manual” book series he created. I use several of O’Reilly’s “Missing” manuals on a regular basis.

His new book has convinced me that, okay, maybe it finally might be time to replace one of my combat-scarred PCs with a shiny new Mac. Then I, too, can radiate some of that lustrous “Everything’s sunshine and bunnies!” glow instead of merely gnashing my teeth at the need to download a new patch or service pack.

“OS X has a spectacular reputation for stability and security,” Pogue assures readers. “At this writing, there hasn’t been a single widespread OS X virus—a spectacular feature that makes Windows look like a waste of time.” (David, David, David. “Waste of time”? Tsk, tsk.)

If you are contemplating making the switch or have already switched from Windows to Mac – one that’s running OS X (Mountain Lion) – you need this book. It is well written and nicely illustrated, and it has a strong focus on helping Windows users feel comfortably at home on a new Mac.

“Be glad you waited so long to get a Mac,” Pogue writes in a chapter titled “Special Software, Special Problems.”

“By now, all the big-name programs look and work almost exactly the same on the Mac as they do on the PC.”

You will encounter situations where a favorite Windows program is not available in a Mac equivalent. But there usually are Mac equivalents that offer similar functions. Or, you often can run Windows programs on an OS X Mac in Windows format, Pogue points out.

He also shows how to transfer documents and other files from Windows machines to Macs. Usually, the transfers go smoothly. “It turns out that communicating with a Windows PC is one of the Mac’s most polished talents,” Pogue notes. Sometimes, there are problems, of course, even in “infallible” Mac Land. But Pogue’s huge book (743 pages) gives clear procedures or suggestions for dealing with most of them. And: “Most big-name programs are sold in both Mac and Windows flavors, and the documents they create are freely interchangeable.”

Switching to the Mac: Mountain Lion Edition is organized into five parts:

  • Part 1, Welcome to the Macintosh – Covers the differences between what you see on a Macintosh screen and a Windows screen. Pogue notes that “OS X offers roughly the same features as Windows. That’s the good news. The bad news is that these features are called different things and parked in different spots.”
  • Part 2, Making the Move – Covers how to move software, data and peripherals such as printers and scanners from a Windows PC to a Mac. Includes steps for running Windows on Macs, using Apple Boot Camp. “The only downsides: Your laptop battery life isn’t as good, and you have to restart the Mac again to return to the familiar world of OS X.”
  • Part 3, Making Connections – Shows how to set up web, iCloud, and email connections on a Mac and use Apple’s Internet software suite.
  • Part 4, Putting Down Roots – Covers user accounts, parental controls, security, networking, file sharing, screen sharing, system preferences, and OS X’s “freebie” programs, such as Calendar, Photo Booth, and QuickTime Player.
  • Part 5…(Hello? Why is Part 5 missing from the table of contents and the pages of the printed version?)
  • Part 6, Appendixes – Two of the four appendixes cover installing OS X Mountain Lion and troubleshooting. The third appendix is “The Windows-to-Mac Dictionary,” especially useful for Windows people who have to use a Macintosh once in a while. “It’s an alphabetical listing of every common Windows function and where to find it in OS X,” Pogue says. And the fourth appendix offers a “master keyboard-shortcut list for the entire Mac OS X universe.”

Switching to the Mac, Mountain Lion Edition offers sound reasons (1) why you may prefer to stick with certain Windows for Mac programs on your new Mac and (2) why you may want to abandon certain Windows programs written for Macs and learn to use the Mac programs that are, in Pogue’s estimation, “better.”

You won’t be alone if you become (as I likely will) a user who moves back and forth between Mac world and Windows world, for a long time if not “forever.” In that case, you’ll definitely want Switching to the Mac: Mountain Lion Edition on your reference shelf.

OS X Mountain Lion: The Missing Manual – Another how-to classic from David Pogue – #bookreview

OS X Mountain Lion: The Missing Manual
David Pogue
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

 David Pogue knows how to produce excellent user manuals. He invented the popular “Missing Manual” series. And he continues to set high standards for other writers who also produce “Missing Manuals” and other tech books.  

Pogue’s newest, OS X Mountain Lion: The Missing Manual, is 864 pages of useful information, well presented, with clear writing and frequent sparks of humor.

It covers OS X 10.8 (which is pronounced “Oh-ess-ten, ten-dot-eight” [or “ten-point-eight”] by the way) and also covers iCloud.  Pogue cautions: “Don’t say ‘oh-ess-ex.’ You’ll get funny looks in public.”

Apple says OS X Mountain Lion has added 200 new features. But some users of previous Mac OS versions may be startled at a few capabilities that have been cut or reduced. (With this release, the term “Mac OS X” also has been reduced to “OS X” to better mesh with “iOS,” Apple contends.) Meanwhile, Pogue continues his well-known penchant for exposing and illustrating undocumented capabilities, irritants, and gotchas in software.

Still, he declares, “OS X is an impressive technical achievement; many experts call it the best personal-computer operating system on earth.”

Best OS or not, if you use OS X 10.8 and iCloud, you likely will want to have this how-to guide close at hand.

“If you could choose only one word to describe Apple’s overarching design goal in Lion and Mountain Lion, there’s no doubt about what it would be: iPad,” Pogue states.  “In this software, Apple has gone about as far as it could go in trying to turn the Mac into an iPad.”

OS X Mountain Lion: The Missing Manual is split into six parts, with 22 chapters and four appendices.

Part One: The OS X Desktop

  • Chapter 0: The Mountain Lion Landscape
  • Chapter 1: Folders & Windows
  • Chapter 2: Organizing Your Stuff
  • Chapter 3: Spotlight
  • Chapter 4: Dock, Desktop & Toolbars

Part Two: Programs in OS X

  • Chapter 5: Documents, Programs & Spaces
  • Chapter 6: Data: Typing, Dictating, Sharing & Backing Up
  • Chapter 7: Automator, AppleScript & Services
  • Chapter 8: Windows on Macintosh

Part Three: The Components of OS X

  • Chapter 9: System Preferences
  • Chapter 10: Reminders, Notes & Notification Center
  • Chapter 11: The Other Free Programs
  • Chapter 12: CDs, DVDs, iTunes & AirPlay

Part Four: The Technologies of OS X

  • Chapter 13: Accounts, Security & Gatekeeper
  • Chapter 14: Networking, File Sharing & AirDrop
  • Chapter 15: Graphics, Fonts & Printing
  • Chapter 16: Sound, Movies & Speech

Part Five: OS X Online

  • Chapter 17: Internet Setup & iCoud
  • Chapter 18: Mail & Contacts
  • Chapter 19: Safari
  • Chapter 20: Messages
  • Chapter 21: SSH, FTP, VPN & Web Sharing

Part Six: Appendixes

  • Appendix A: Installing OS X Mountain Lion
  • Appendix B: Troubleshooting
  • Appendix C: The Windows-to-Mac Dictionary
  • Appendix D: The Master OS X Secret Keystroke List

The focus stays firmly on “What’s this new feature for?” in OS X Mountain Lion: The Missing Manual. And David Pogue’s latest how-to classic makes it fun to test out a new feature with a good sense of what is supposed to happen and which choices are available or problematic .

Beats the heck out of opening up the software, randomly tinkering with selections, options and default settings, and then trying to figure out what you just did wrong.

Si Dunn

Macintosh Terminal Pocket Guide and OS X Mountain Lion Pocket Guide – #bookreview

O’Reilly recently has released two compact and handy guides for Macintosh users: the Macintosh Terminal Pocket Guide and the OS X Mountain Lion Pocket Guide.

Macintosh Terminal Pocket Guide
Daniel J. Barrett
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

Macintosh Terminal is termed “the Macintosh’s best-kept secret” in this conveniently organized , well-illustrated guidebook.  Terminal also is described as “one of the most powerful programs for controlling your Mac.”

The author notes: “The Terminal is an application that runs commands.  If you’re familiar with DOS command lines on Windows, the Terminal is somewhat similar (but much more powerful).”

The book begins with a short, basic tutorial for those who need to know what a “command” is and how to enter commands. It also describes how the Mac’s file system is organized, and it delves into other beginner’s aspects of working at the command line.

More experienced users, meanwhile, can go right to the 223-page book’s table of contents and index to quickly find discussions of commands and their available options.

The Macintosh Terminal Pocket Guide bills itself as “a short guide to the Terminal, not a comprehensive reference.”  But it contains explanations and how-to instructions for many OS X commands.

You may find yourself suddenly needing to know how to kill a program that won’t quit, or log in to your Mac from a remote location, or compress and uncompress files in several different formats. The paperback version of the Macintosh Terminal Pocket Guide really does fit into a pants pocket or coat pocket, and it won’t take up much room in a computer bag or purse, either. 

OS X Mountain Lion Pocket Guide
Chris Seibold
(O’Reilly, paperback – Kindle)

For new and experienced users of the OS X Mountain Lion operating system, this 252-page “quick” reference guide delivers solid how-to information that focuses on major features, system preferences, built-in applications, and utilities. It also provides common keyboard shortcuts, and troubleshooting tips.

Like the Macintosh Terminal Pocket Guide, the paperback version of this guidebook is conveniently sized to slip into a pocket, computer bag or purse without adding much bulk or weight, and it has a good index and table of contents for quick reference.

The OS X Mountain Lion Pocket Guide is divided into eight chapters:

  • Chapter 1: What’s New in Mountain Lion?
  • Chapter 2: Installing Mountain Lion and Migrating Data
  • Chapter 3: A Quick Guide to Mountain Lion
  • Chapter 4: Troubleshooting OS X
  • Chapter 5: System Preferences
  • Chapter 6: Built-in Applications and Utilities
  • Chapter 7: Managing Passwords in Mountain Lion
  • Chapter 8: Keyboard Commands and Special Characters

“With every revision of OS X, Apple leaves some Macs behind, and Mountain Lion is no exception,” the author cautions.  His book describes the Macs that can run it and gives some information about the ones that can’t. Certain upgrades may make it possible to install the software.

He adds: “So how do you find out whether your Mac is compatible with Mountain Lion? The simplest way is to try to buy the software from the App Store.  If your Mac isn’t compatible, the App Store will tell you that the software won’t run on that machine.”

The even easier way to run OS X Mountain Lion, of course, is to just buy a new Mac that already has it installed.

No matter which option you choose, however, you may need to keep this book close at hand.

Si Dunn

My New iPad, 3rd Edition – A crisp, well-organized user’s guide – #ipad #bookreview

My New iPad, 3rd Edition: A User’s Guide
Wallace Wang
(No Starch Press, paperback, list price $24.95; Kindle edition, $9.99)

If you don’t already own an iPad, this crisp, nicely illustrated and well-organized user’s guide can make you wish you did. And if you’ve recently pulled an iPad out of the box and started using it, My New iPad, 3rd Edition can help you master features you likely haven’t tried yet.

“The iPad,” notes veteran author Wallace Wang, “offers so many features that one person may focus on its ebook reading features, another may focus on its video and music playing capabilities, someone else might be interested in browsing the Internet, and still another might focus on the ability to type and edit text to create slide show presentations, spreadsheets, or business reports.”

His 289-page book covers “the original iPad, iPad 2, and new iPad.” It is divided into 32 “short chapters that act like recipes in a cookbook. Each chapter explains how to accomplish a specific task and then lists all the steps you need to follow,” Wang says.

The 32 chapters are grouped into six parts:

  • Part 1: Basic Training
  • Part 2: Making the Most of Your iPad
  • Part 3: Getting on the Internet
  • Part 4: Video, Music, Photos, and Ebooks
  • Part 5: Organizing Yourself
  • Part 6: Additional Tips

My New iPad, 3rd Edition covers everything from turning on an iPad to putting it into airplane mode, setting up email, typing with voice dictation, creating a slide show, changing the appearance of a map, defining a foreign-language virtual keyboard, dealing with a frozen app, and using the tracking feature to find a lost or stolen iPad.

Before learning the touch gestures that control an iPad’s screen, Wang recommends first getting comfortable with “[t]he two most commonly used buttons…the Sleep/Wake button and the Home button.”

He notes: “Since you’ll be using the Home button often, take the time to practice returning to the Home screen by pressing the Home button once. If you press the Home button twice in rapid succession, you can lock the screen rotation, adjust the volume, or switch to another app.”

Wang adds: “Locking the screen rotation can be handy if you like curling up in a chair or sofa with your iPad. Without locking your screen, the image might flip back and forth between portrait and landscape mode.”

Switching between apps via the Home button can be handy, because you can leave one app, such as a game, in its current state while you make a quick check of email.

And double-clicking the Home button also gives access to the touch-screen’s up-down slider for the volume control–after you’ve first swipe your app icons to the right.

These are just a few basic samples of the many how-to tips in this book. Wang also offers numerous tips and “additional ideas” for getting the most out of your iPad and its powerful range of capabilities.

Si Dunn

Take Control of Your 802.11n AirPort Network, 3rd. Ed. – Has info for new AirPort Utility 6 – #Apple #bookreview

Take Control of Your 802.11n AirPort Network, Third Edition
Glenn Fleishman
(TidBITS Publishing, Inc., ebook [ePub, Mobi, PDF], $20.00)

Attention users of Apple’s 802.11n gear in Wi-Fi networking. TidBITS Publishing recently has released a new edition of Take Control of your 802.11n Airport Network.

Its author points out: “If you’re setting up, extending, or retooling a Wi-Fi network with one or more 802.11n base stations from Apple— including the AirPort Extreme, AirPort Express, or Time Capsule— using AirPort Utility 6 on the Mac or AirPort Utility in iOS, this book will help you get the fastest network with the least equipment and fewest roadblocks. This book also has advice on connecting to a Wi-Fi network from older versions of Mac OS X and Windows 7.”

If you are still using AirPort Utility 5, pay attention.

“This third edition,” TidBITS notes, “has a significant change: it replaces its former coverage of AirPort Utility 5 in favor of focusing on AirPort Utility 6, which was released in February 2012. AirPort Utility 6 runs on 10.7 Lion or later. AirPort Utility 6 has many of the features that are documented in previous editions of this book, but it omits several options designed for mixed 802.11g and 80211.n networks and it can’t configure 802.11b and 802.11g AirPort base station models (any base station released from 1999 to 2006). Also, it supports only iCloud, not MobileMe, for remote connections.”

If you are caught in the middle and need to support both AirPort Utility 5 and AirPort Utility 6, purchasers of this ebook are given a link where they can refer to the previous edition, at no extra charge.

Says Fleishman, “The big new feature in AirPort Utility 6 is a graphical depiction of the layout of an AirPort network. This is terrific for visualizing how parts are connected and seeing where errors lie. This third edition also discusses AirPort Utility for iOS, which has a similar approach to AirPort Utility 6, and makes it possible to configure and manage an Apple base station without a desktop computer. That’s a first for Apple.”

The book is well-written, with text presented in short paragraphs for easier viewing on portable devices.

Take Control of Your 802.11n AirPort Network, Third Edition also offers a good number of uncomplicated illustrations, screenshots, tips, warnings, and lists of steps.

– Si Dunn

Learning iOS Programming, 2nd Ed. – Updated to cover iOS 5, iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch – #programming #bookreview

Learning iOS Programming, 2nd Edition
By Alasdair Allan
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $34.99; Kindle edition, list price $27.99)

Alasdair Allan’s popular iOS programming book recently has been updated to cover iOS 5. And it has a new name. (The first edition was titled Learning iPhone Programming.)

“The changes made in this second edition reflect the fact that a lot has happened since the first edition was published: the release of the iPad, a major release of Xcode, two revisions of the operating system itself, and the arrival of Apple’s iCloud,” the author notes. “This book has therefore been refreshed, renewed, and updated to reflect these fairly fundamental changes to the platform, and all of the example code was rewritten from the ground up for Xcode 4 and iOS 5 using ARC.”

Allan’s book – well-written and appropriately illustrated – is structured to provide “a rapid introduction to programming for the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad,” and it assumes that you have some familiarity with C or a C-derived language, as well as a basic understanding of object-oriented programming.

And the pace is fast. By chapter 3, you are building the requisite “Hello, World” application and running it in iPhone Simulator.

In that same chapter, Allan also introduces the basic syntax of Objective-C and highlights some of the “rather strange” ways that it deals with method calls. He discusses how the Cocoa Touch framework underlying iOS applications “is based on one of the oldest design patterns, the Model-View-Controller pattern, which dates from the 1970s.” And he warns that “[a]ttempting to write iOS applications while ignoring the underlying MVC patterns is a pointless exercise in make-work.”

Learning iOS Programming, 2nd Edition does not emphasize web-based applications. It centers, instead, on creating native applications using Apple’s SDK. “The obvious reason to use the native SDK,” Allan states, “is to do things that you can’t do using web technologies. The first generation of augmented reality applications is a case in point; these needed close integration with the iPhone’s onboard sensors (e.g., GPS, accelerometer, digital compass, and camera) and wouldn’t have been possible without that access.”

He emphasizes a financial reason, as well. “Consumers won’t buy your application on their platform just because you support other platforms; instead they want an application that looks like the rest of the applications on their platform, that follows the same interface paradigms as the rest of the applications they’re used to, and is integrated into their platform.”

He adds: “If you integrate your application into the iOS ecosphere, make use of the possibilities that the hardware offers, and make sure your user interface is optimized for the device, the user experience is going to be much improved.”

Hard to argue with that.

Learning iOS Programming, 2nd Edition provides the steps necessary to develop and market your first iOS application. Allan notes: “Until recently, the only way to obtain the iOS SDK was to become a registered iOS developer. However, you can now download the current release of Xcode and the iOS SDK directly from the Mac App Store.”

Of course, if you intend to distribute your applications “or even just deploy them onto your own device, you will also need to register with Apple as a developer and then enroll in one of the developer programs.”

You may need some system upgrades, as well. To develop apps for the iOS, you’ll need an Intel Mac running OS X 10.6 (“Snow Leopard”) or later. If you plan to create apps that use Apple’s iCloud, you’ll need OS X 10.7 (“Lion”) or later.

One other recommendation from Allan: If you’re truly serious about being an iOS developer, consider also registering with the Mac Developer Program.

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir. He is the author of an e-book detective novel, Erwin’s Law, now also available in paperback, plus a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

iPad: The Missing Manual, 4th Ed. – A fine how-to guide for iPads new or ‘old’ – #bookreview #ipad #in

iPad: The Missing Manual, 4th edition
By J.D. Biersdorfer
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $24.99; Kindle edition, list price $19.99)

Why a fourth edition already? Apple’s iPad hasn’t been around that long, has it?

The reason behind this new (indeed) 4th edition of iPad: The Missing Manual is quite simple, according to author J.D. Biersdorfer. 

“It’s become,” he writes, “something of a spring ritual: the clocks move forward an hour, flowers begin to bloom, and Apple releases a new version of its iPad tablet computer. March 2012 was no different: the fastest iPad yet arrived on the scene and millions of people scrambled to buy it. Apple calls it the new iPad, and this book refers to it as the 2012 iPad or the third-generation iPad.” 

He adds that “Apple decided it didn’t want to get locked into upping the iPad model number every year.” (His book, by the way, can be used with any version of the iPad thus far.) 

The differences between the still-available iPad 2 and the new 2012 iPad (other than price) are mainly “a matter of screen and speed,” Biersdorfer adds. “The 2012 iPad…sports a robust A5X processor; a pixel-packing, high-definition Retina display; and a 5-megapixel back camera.” The cheaper iPad 2, “on the other hand, cruises along on a slower A5 processor and has a screen that’s half the resolution of the Retina display, though it’s still crisp. It has a rear camera with around a megapixel resolution for still photos (which is not very sharp), but can record video at 720p, which still counts as high-definition.” 

Apple gives you a basic quick-start card in the iPad box, and then you’re left to your own initiative, cleverness and occasional confusion.  

This well-written, well-illustrated “Missing Manual” guidebook provides 361 pages of clear how-to steps and tips, plus troubleshooting information and a nice index.

If you truly value your time and are trying to keep frustrations minimized in your life, this cool guidebook can be a helpful reference companion to carry along with (or on) your iPad – whether it’s the new one, the one that’s now so last year, or (gasp!) the one that’s even older.

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir. He is the author of an e-book detective novel, Erwin’s Law, now also available in paperback, plus a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

Three new specialized how-to books for SharePoint, JQuery & Mac OS X Lion Server – #bookreview #in #programming

Here are three new books for those with at least some basic to intermediate experience with Microsoft SharePoint, or web development, or Mac OS X Lion.

Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Creating and Implementing Real-World Projects
By Jennifer Mason, Christian Buckley, Brian T. Jackett, and Wes Preston
(Microsoft Press,
paperback, list price $34.99; Kindle edition, list price $27.99)

If you have some background in Microsoft SharePoint and want to dig deeper, this book can help you learn how to use SharePoint to create real-world solutions to ten common business problems.

Each chapter is devoted to a single project, such as creating a FAQ system to help users quickly find answers to their questions, setting up a help desk solution to track service requests, or building a simple project management system.

The projects are based on “various scenarios encountered by the authors as we have used SharePoint as a tool to build solutions that address business needs….Each of the solutions has been implemented in one or more organization,” they state.

Do not jump into Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Creating and Implementing Real-World Projects until you have gained “a general understanding of the basics of SharePoint,” the authors caution. And note that SharePoint is not easily defined as one “type” of product.

If you keep in mind the process of building a house, they write, “SharePoint is like the various tools and materials, and the final business solutions you build are like the house. There are many features and tools in SharePoint, and within this book, you will see different ways to combine and structure them into business solutions.”

Their 403-page book is well written and cleanly organized with short paragraphs and many headings, step lists and illustrations. It also has an extensive index.

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JQuery: Novice to Ninja, 2nd Edition
By Earle Castledine and Craig Sharkie
(SitePoint,
paperback, list price $39.95; Kindle edition, list price $29.95)

Technology changes fast, and web developers curious about JQuery will welcome this updated edition of Earle Castledine’s and Craig Sharkie’s book that first appeared in 2010.

This also is not a book for beginners. “You should,” the authors note, “already have intermediate to advanced HTML and CSS skills, as JQuery uses CSS-style selectors to zero in on page elements. Some rudimentary programming knowledge will be helpful to have,” they add, “as JQuery—despite its clever abstractions—is still based on JavaScript.” 

The authors offer high praise for the power of JQuery: “Aside from being a joy to use, one of the biggest benefits of JQuery is that it handles a lot of infuriating cross-browser issues for you. Anyone who has written serious JavaScript in the past can attest that cross-browser inconsistencies will drive you mad.”

They describe how to download and include the latest version of JQuery in web pages. And their book is organized to introduce JQuery features and code examples while also showing you, step by step, how to build a complete working application.

JQuery: Novice to Ninja, 2nd Edition has plenty of illustrations and is well indexed and written in a friendly, approachable style. 

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Using Mac OS X Lion Server
By Charles Edge
(O’Reilly,
paperback, list price $29.99; Kindle edition, list price $23.99)

Yes, intermediate and advanced system administrators will find some useful information in this well-written and nicely illustrated guide.

“But the book,” says author Charles Edge, “is really meant for new system administrators: the owner of the small business, the busy parent trying to manage all of those iPhone and iPads the kids are running around with, the teacher with a classroom full of iMacs or iPads, and of course, the new podcaster, just looking for a place to host countless hours of talking about the topic of her choice.”

What Using Mac OS X Lion Server  does not cover is “managing a Lion Server from the command line, scripting client management, or other advanced topics.”

The topics it does cover include: Planning for and installing a server; sharing and backing up files; sharing address books, calendars, and iChat; Wikis, webs and blogs; building a mail server; building a podcasting server; managing Apple computers and iOS devices; network services; and deploying Mac OS X computers.

The author cautions: “In many ways, the traditional system administrator will find Lion challenging in its consumeristic approach. There is a lot of power under the hood, but the tools used to manage the server have been simplified so that anyone can manage it, not just veteran Unix gods.”

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir. He is the author of an e-book detective novel, Erwin’s Law, now also available in paperback, plus a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Lion Edition – #bookreview #in #mac #windows

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Lion Edition
By David Pogue
(O’Reilly,
paperback, list price $29.99; Kindle edition, list price $23.99)

I own and use three Windows PCs during a typical day. But sometimes (don’t ask why), I find myself forced – forced – to use my wife’s Macintosh.

Grrrr. Where do I click? Where are the other mouse buttons? And what do these geeky, alien icons actually mean?

Frankly, I’ve hated Macs for a long, long time. And I’ve especially hated the smug, “Everything’s simpler on a Mac!” attitude that peppy Mac users seem to radiate whenever they are around us gray-haired Windows types who  have been messing with command prompts, anti-virus software, and the Blue Screen of Death since (seemingly) the War of 1812.

That being said, I am a big fan of New York Times tech columnist David Pogue and “The Missing Manual” book series he created.  I use several of O’Reilly’s “Missing” manuals on a frequent basis.

Pogue’s new book is now proving useful for me as a sort of Klingon-to-English translation guide when I am forced – forced –to use my beloved’s dearly beloved Mac.

But in all seriousness, if you are contemplating making the switch or have already switched from Windows to Mac (traitor!), you need this book. It is a well-written, nicely illustrated user’s guide with a strong focus on how to transfer documents and other files from Windows machines to Macs. Often, the transfers go smoothly. “It turns out that communicating with a Windows PC is one of the Mac’s most polished talents,” Pogue notes.

Sometimes, however, the transfers do not go well. Pogue’s huge book (691 pages) also points out some potential pitfalls and remedies, such as possibly losing “memorized transactions, customized report designs, and reconciliations” when transferring from QuickBooks for Windows to QuickBooks to Mac.

Switching to the Mac is organized into five parts:

  • Part 1, Welcome to the Macintosh – Covers the essentials of “everything you see onscreen when you turn on the machine.”
  • Part 2, Making the Move – Covers “the actual process of hauling your software, settings, and even peripherals (like printers and monitors) across the chasm from the PC to the Mac.” Includes steps for running Windows on Macs, “an extremely attractive option.”
  • Part 3, Making Connections – Shows how to set up an Internet connection on a Mac and use Apple’s Internet software suite.
  • Part 4, Putting Down Roots – Gets into more advanced topics “to turn you into a Macintosh power user.”
  • Part 5, Appendixes – Two of the four appendixes cover installation and troubleshooting. One is the “Where’d It Go?” Dictionary for those trying to find familiar Windows controls “in the new, alien Macintosh environment.” And the fourth appendix offers “a master keyboard-shortcut list for the entire Mac OS X universe.”  

Switching to the Mac offers sound reasons (1) why you may prefer to stick with certain Windows for Mac programs on your new Mac and (2) why you may want to abandon certain Windows programs written for Macs and learn to use the Mac programs that are better than, say, PowerPoint or Notepad, for example.

If you happen to be addicted to Microsoft Access and Microsoft Visio, you have a separate choice. You can either switch to FileMaker and OmniGraffle or keep a Windows machine sitting close to your new Mac.

You won’t be alone as a user caught between two different worlds. Writes Pogue: “A huge percentage of ‘switchers’ do not, in fact, switch.  Often, they just add.  They may get a Macintosh (and get into the Macintosh), but they keep the old Windows PC around, at least for a while.”

In my case, you’ll have to pry the Windows keyboard and mouse from my cold, dead fingers. But I’ll keep this hefty book with me, to use both as a how-to guide and as a bludgeon, each time I have to go into the Macintosh wilds and battle the Lion.

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir available now in paperback. He is the author of a detective novel, Erwin’s Law, a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.