jQUERY UI IN ACTION: A smooth guide to getting, learning and using plugins supported by the jQuery Foundation – #bookreview

jQuery UI in Action

TJ VanToll

 (Manning - paperback)

 

TJ VanToll had two straightforward goals in mind when he decided to write this nicely prepared book: “I wanted to write about how to use the jQuery UI components in real-world usage scenarios and applications. I also wanted to tackle the tough questions for jQuery UI users. [Such as] Why should you use the jQuery UI datepicker instead of the native date picker included in HTML5? How do you use jQuery UI on mobile devices, especially in low bandwidth situations?”

According to the jQuery Foundation, “jQuery is a fast, small, and feature-rich JavaScript library. It makes things like HTML document traversal and manipulation, event handling, animation, and Ajax much simpler with an easy-to-use API that works across a multitude of browsers. With a combination of versatility and extensibility, jQuery has changed the way that millions of people write JavaScript.”

The problem with popularity, of course, is that jQuery became widely employed soon after it was introduced in 2006. Users quickly created a flood of jQuery plugins that, Van Toll writes, “had inconsistent APIs, and often had little or no documentation. Because of these problems, the jQuery team wanted to provide an official set of plugins in a centralized location. In September 2007 they created a new library with these plugins—jQuery UI.”

He adds: “From a high level, jQuery UI was, and still is, a collection of plugins and utilities that build on jQuery. But dig deeper and you find a set of consistent, well-documented, themeable building blocks to help you create everything from small websites to highly complex web applications. Unlike jQuery plugins, the plugins and utilities in jQuery UI are supported by the jQuery Foundation. You can count on them to be officially supported and maintained throughout the life of your application.”

Well-written and well-illustrated, jQuery UI in Action reflects VanToll’s knowledge and experience as a professional web developer and member of the core jQuery UI team.

The book is structured into three parts, encompassing 12 chapters. And it assumes readers have at least basic experience with JavaScript, CSS, and jQuery.

Part One’s chapters introduce jQuery UI and “the ins and outs of widgets…the core building blocks of jQuery UI.”

Part Two’s chapters offer “a comprehensive look at the components of jQuery UI: twelve jQuery UI widgets (chapters 3–4), five jQuery
UI interactions (chapter 5), numerous jQuery UI effects (chapter 6), and the jQuery UI CSS framework (chapter 7).” VanToll explains how each component works and shows how to apply the knowledge to real-world applications. The example projects include: building complex webforms with jQueryUI; using layout and utility widgets; adding interaction to interfaces; and using built-in and customized themes to provide “a consistent look to all widgets.”

Part Three focuses on “Customization and advanced usage.” Here, VanToll explores such topics as using the widget factory to create custom widgets, preparing applications for production, and building a flight-search application “at real-world scale.” In the final chapter, he takes us under jQuery’s hood “to dig into a series of utilities, methods, and properties intended for more advanced usage of the library.”

If you work with jQuery or are ready to start using it, take a good look at jQuery UI, as well. As this book promises, “You’re only one tag away from richer user interfaces….” That tag is pretty simple: <script src=”jquery-ui.js”> — but a lot can happen once you include it.

TJ VanToll’s new book should be your go-to guide for getting, learning and putting jQuery UI into action.

Si Dunn

 

 

 

 

 

http://amzn.to/1r1VwUI

 

You’ll master jQuery UI’s five main interactions—draggable, droppable, resizable, selectable, and sortable—and learn UI techniques that work across all devices.

THE RESPONSIVE WEB: A ‘mobile-first’ guide to creating websites effective for all devices – #bookreview

The Responsive Web

Matthew Carver

(Manning – paperback)

While devices for viewing websites keep getting smaller–web-enabled watches are a recent example–the challenges get bigger and tougher for website designers and developers. How do you create websites that effectively adjust to the size of the devices where they are being viewed, while also delivering essential information and links to the viewers?

“Responsive web design,” Matthew Carver writes in his excellent new book, “is a technique of designing websites that scale for various browsers, including mobile, tablet, and desktop. It’s made possible through CSS3 Media queries and offers developers the opportunity to design a site once for multiple devices. While the technique is seemingly simple, the practice itself involves several challenges.”

Carver’s book, The Responsive Web, goes well beyond simply showing and explaining a few web page templates. With clear text and excellent illustrations, the author offers numerous practical techniques and tips, and he provides the reasoning behind their importance, without wandering too deeply into web-design and user-experience theory.

This superior how-to book reflects Carver’s real-world experience as “an early adopter of responsive web design.” As a front-end designer, web developer and consultant, his clients have included such notables as American Airlines, the Dallas Morning News, Chobani, Home Depot, and Google.

The Responsive Web is divided into three parts, with a total of nine chapters.

Starting at Part One: The Responsive Way, Carver definitely does not dawdle. In the very first chapter, we are offered “all the basic information you need to get started with responsive web design.” Chapter 2, meanwhile, covers a key concept in Carver’s approach: “designing for mobile first” when creating responsive websites.

Part Two: Designing for the Responsive Web has four chapters built around “what goes into responsive web design from the visual designer’s and user-experience (UX) designer’s perspectives,” Carver writes, “but don’t think this information won’t apply to developers. There’s important stuff in here for everyone, and as this book teaches, web design requires collaboration.”

In Part Three: Expanding the Design with Code, the three final chapters cover some of the grittier details of responsive web design, including creating an effective page with HTML5 and CSS3, working with graphics, and using “progressive enhancement.” Carver notes: “With progressive enhancement you can create websites so that they function well in a variety of platforms, each with their own limitations and specifications.” And finally, he does not skip “testing and optimization.” The book’s final chapter is devoted to “the nitty gritty of optimizing your website for performance on every screen.”

In an intriguing appendix, Carver also discusses the processes and possibilities of introducing certain degrees of context awareness to websites. “What if, instead of resizing the design to adapt to the user’s device, you could also format parts of the site based on factors like location, time of day, the user’s history on the site, or the user’s activity level,” he points out. “Theoretically, all of this data is accessible to the design of a page and could be used to greatly enhance the user’s experience.”

Bottom line,  this is a very timely and useful guide for those who work with websites, as well as for those who manage web designers and developers.

Si Dunn

 

HADOOP IN PRACTICE, 2nd Edition – An updated guide to handling some of the ‘trickier and dirtier aspects of Hadoop’ – #programming #bookreview

 

Hadoop in Practice, Second Edition

Alex Holmes

(Manning - paperback )

 

The Hadoop world has undergone some big changes lately, and this hefty, updated edition offers excellent coverage of a lot of what’s new. If you currently work with Hadoop and MapReduce or are planning to take them up soon, give serious consideration to adding this well-written book to your technical library. A key feature of the book is its “104 techniques.” These show how to accomplish practical and important tasks when working with Hadoop, MapReduce and their growing array of software “friends.”

The author, Alex Holmes, has been working with Hadoop for more than six years and is a software engineer, author, speaker, and blogger specializing in large-scale Hadoop projects.

His new second edition, he writes, “covers Hadoop 2, which at the time of writing is the current production-ready version of Hadoop. The first edition of the book covered Hadoop 0.22 (Hadoop 1 wasn’t yet out), and Hadoop 2 has turned the world upside-down and opened up the Hadoop platform to processing paradigms beyond MapReduce. YARN, the new scheduler and application manager in Hadoop 2, is complex and new to the community, which prompted me to dedicate a new chapter 2 to covering YARN basics and to discussing how MapReduce now functions as a YARN application.”

In the book, Holmes notes that “Parquet has also recently emerged as a new way to store data in HDFS—its columnar format can yield both space and time efficiencies in your data pipelines, and it’s quickly becoming the ubiquitous way to store data. Chapter 4 includes extensive coverage of Parquet, which includes how Parquet supports sophisticated object models such as Avro and how various Hadoop tools can use Parquet.”

Furthermore, “[h]ow data is being ingested into Hadoop has also evolved since the first edition,” Holmes points out, “and Kafka has emerged as the new data pipeline, which serves as the transport tier between your data producers and data consumers, where a consumer would be a system
such as Camus that can pull data from Kafka into HDFS. Chapter 5, which covers moving data into and out of Hadoop, now includes coverage of Kafka and Camus.”  [Reviewer’s note: Interesting software names here. Franz Kafka and Alfred Camus were writers deeply concerned about finding clarity and meaning in a world that seemed to offer none.]

Holmes adds that “[t]here are many new technologies that YARN now can support side by side in the same cluster, and some of the more exciting and promising technologies are covered in the new part 4, titled ‘Beyond MapReduce,’ where I cover some compelling new SQL technologies such as Impala and Spark SQL. The last chapter, also new for this edition, looks at how you can write your own YARN application, and it’s packed with information about important features to support your YARN application.”

Hadoop and MapReduce have gained reputations (well-earned) for being difficult to set up, use and master. In his new edition, Holmes describes his own early experiences: “The greatest challenge we faced when working with Hadoop, and specifically MapReduce, was relearning how to solve problems with it. MapReduce is its own flavor of parallel programming, and it’s quite different from the in-JVM programming that we were accustomed to. The first big hurdle was training our brains to think MapReduce, a topic which the book Hadoop in Action by Chuck Lam (Manning Publications, 2010) covers well.”

(These days, of course, there are both open source and commercial releases of Hadoop, as well as quickstart virtual machine versions that are good for learning Hadoop.)

Holmes continues: “After one is used to thinking in MapReduce, the next challenge is typically related to the logistics of working with Hadoop, such as how to move data in and out of HDFS and effective and efficient ways to work with data in Hadoop. These areas of Hadoop haven’t received much coverage, and that’s what attracted me to the potential of this book—the chance to go beyond the fundamental word-count Hadoop uses and covering some of the trickier and dirtier aspects of Hadoop.”

If you have difficulty explaining Hadoop to others (such as a manager or executive hesitant to let it be implemented), Holmes offers a succint summation in his updated book:

“Doug Cutting, the creator of Hadoop, likes to call Hadoop the kernel for big data, and I would tend to agree. With its distributed storage and compute capabilities, Hadoop is fundamentally an enabling technology for working with huge datasets. Hadoop provides a bridge between structured (RDBMS) and unstructured (log files, XML, text) data and allows these datasets to be easily joined together.”

One book cannot possibly cover everything you need to know about Hadoop, MapReduce, Parquet, Kafka, Camus, YARN and other technologies. And this book and its software examples assume that you have some experience with Java, XML and JSON. Yet Hadoop in Practice, Second Edition gives a very good and reasonably deep overview, spanning such major categories as background and fundamentals, data logistics, Big Data patterns, and moving beyond MapReduce.

Si Dunn

 

 

BLEEDING KANSAS: Coming-of-age adventure and danger on the American frontier just before the Civil War – #fiction #bookreview

Bleeding Kansas

Dave Eisenstark

(World Castle Publishing, LLC - paperback, Kindle)

 

It is very tempting to say: “This book is a lot like Huckleberry Finn, but on land, with lots of horses and guns!”

However, amid the humor, the horrors and the main character’s many dangerous, coming-of-age adventures, readers also get close, unnerving looks at a very rough, very dark chapter in American history.

During a seven-year period leading up to the Civil War, violent clashes in Kansas and parts of Missouri pitted anti-slavery “Free-Staters” against pro-slavery “Border Ruffians.” It was gang warfare on horseback, and it also was a proxy conflict that demonstrated what was about to happen on a gigantic scale once the North and South split and took up arms against each other.

In Bleeding Kansas, a Quaker youth from Pennsylvania, James Deeter,  heads west, trying to avoid being drafted into the Union Army. But Deeter makes some naive and unfortunate decisions along the way. To survive, he finds himself suddenly facing his worst nightmare: He must ride in raids as part of the pro-Confederate gang known as Quantrill’s Raiders.

Eisenstark’s fiction in this book can stretch credulity at times, and it relies on a few coincidences and confluences of historic characters. Yet those just enhance the dark humor and the moments of real horror and surprise that keep coming as the well-written work of history-based fiction unfolds.

Memo to producers: Bleeding Kansas has the makings of an action-packed movie for a rising young star.

Si Dunn

Advanced Software Testing, Vol. 2, 2nd Edition – Study guide for ISTQB Advanced Test Manager – #bookreview

Advanced Software Testing, Volume 2, 2nd Edition

Guide to the ISTQB Advanced Certification as an Advanced Test Manager

Rex Black

(Rocky Nook - paperback)

 

Software testing is a complex and constantly evolving field. And having some well-recognized certifications is a good way to help encourage  your continued employability as a software tester and manager of software test teams.

Advanced Software Testing, Volume 2, 2nd Edition, focuses on showing you how to obtain an International Software Testing Qualifications Board (ISTQB) certification as an advanced test manager. The 519-page book is well-written and lays out what test managers should know to gain advanced skills in test estimation, test planning, test monitoring, and test control.

It also emphasizes  knowing how to define overall testing goals and strategies for the systems you and your team are testing. And it gives you strategies for preparing for and passing the 65-question Advanced Test Manager qualification test that is administered by ISTQB member boards and exam providers.

This second edition has been updated to reflect the ISTQB’s Advanced Test Manager 2012 Syllabus.  Advanced Software Testing, Volume 2, 2nd Edition takes a hands-on, exercise-rich approach, and it provides experience with essential how-tos for planning, scheduling, and tracking important tasks.

The updated book focuses on a variety of key processes that a software test manager must be able to handle, including describing and organizing the activities necessary to select, find and assign the right number of resources for testing tasks. You also must learn how to organize and lead testing teams, and how to manage the communications among testing teams’ members and between testing teams and all the other stakeholders. And you will need to know how to justify your testing decisions and report necessary information both to your superiors and members of your teams.

As for taking the complicated qualifications test, the author urges: “Don’t panic! Remember, the exam is meant to test your achievement of the learning objectives in the Advanced  Test Manager syllabus.” In other words, you cannot simply skim this book and take the exam. You must spend significant time on the learning exercises, sample questions and ISTQB glossary.

Si Dunn

***

Get the book here: Advanced Software Testing, Volume 2, 2nd Edition

***

Twelve American Wars: Nine of Them Avoidable – Eugene G. Windchy’s new book is a true “must read” – #bookreview

Twelve American Wars: Nine of Them Avoidable

Eugene G. Windchy

(iUniverse - paperback, Kindle)

You may not agree with every opinion, conclusion or finding expressed in this book, but it is a remarkable work that definitely should be read and given thoughtful consideration.

Twelve American Wars: Nine of Them Avoidable offers eye-opening looks at how the United States has blundered, pushed itself or gotten itself dragged into a dozen different wars between the late 1700s and today and how three-fourths of those wars could have been avoided.

Eugene G. Windchy is a superb researcher, and his well-known book Tonkin Gulf has long had special meaning for me. I spent nearly a year in the South China Sea and Tonkin Gulf aboard a destroyer, starting three days after the still-controversial Tonkin Gulf incidents in 1964. I was amazed at what Windchy was able to dig up about those “attacks” and what they ultimately helped trigger: massive expansion of the Vietnam War. Much of what he reported jibed strongly with what I knew and had experienced, but I was forbidden, for many years, to discuss my involvement because of secrecy restrictions.

Windchy’s new book quickly digs beneath the short, glossy, generally laudatory paragraphs we have read in American history textbooks. Indeed, you may be both amazed and distressed when you ponder his descriptions of how and why a dozen significant wars involving the United States actually got started and how at least nine of the wars realistically could have been avoided.

Si Dunn

Photoshop CC and Lightroom – An elegant, well-focused how-to handbook from Rocky Nook – #photography #bookreview

 

Photoshop CC and Lightroom

A Photographer’s Handbook

Stephen Laskevitch

(Rocky Nook - paperback, Kindle)

 

Stephen Laskevitch’s Photoshop CC and Lightroom is an excellent how-to book that both instructs and inspires.

This elegant new how-to book from Rocky Nook is aimed at digital photographers and graphics designers “who want to learn the basic tools and image editing steps within Photoshop and Lightroom to recreate professional looking images.” However, the book also is recommended for “a wide range of technicians and office workers who simply want to do more effective image editing.”

As a sometimes-photographer and not-frequent-enough user of feature-rich Photoshop, I definitely need how-to books like this to keep me on track with the features that I “know,” while also reminding me that there are many useful features I have not yet tried or learned. Fortunately, Laskevitch, an Adobe Certified Instructor, deliberately avoids the common tendency to showcase just the  “wow-factor Photoshop techniques.” Instead, he emphasizes “all the key techniques for good image editing: using layers and layer blending, color correction, printer profiles, and more.”

His book is richly illustrated with photographs that can inspire you to pick up your camera and go shoot. And it has plenty of how-to illustrations and steps for using the 2014 release of Photoshop CC, plus its companions: Bridge, Camera Raw, and Lightroom 5, as you process, enhance and preserve your images.

Bridge is a tool that lets you examine, sort, rate and organize the images in a folder. Adobe Camera Raw provides a few settings that can be selected or adjusted, and Laskevitch recommends shooting in RAW format, unless shooting snapshots. “One of the biggst advantages of RAW files,” he emphasizes, “is that they have more than 8 bits per channel of information and can therefore be edited more than JPEG files.” Lightroom, meanwhile, is “a photographer-friendly database application” that helps you keep track of your images and where you have stored them.

Photoshop CC and Lightroom is divided into two parts and ten chapters:

The Setup

  • Important Terms & Concepts
  • System Configuration
  • The Interface: A Hands-On Tour

The Workflow

  • Capture & Import
  • Organizing & Archiving Images
  • Global Adjustments
  • Local Adjustments
  • Cleaning & Retouching
  • Creative Edits & Alternatives
  • Output

“Output,” Laskevitch notes, “is the creation of what I call deliverables, whether that is a print, a book, a web site, or a digital file. Printing should be easier than it is, especially after all of these years of digital imaging. Improved with each release of Photoshop, the method I outline is simpler than ever. But since it uses profiles tht describe your printer’s characteristics to achineve stunning consistency and optimal results, you’ll have to keep focused nonetheless. This method,” he explains,” can also allaow you to experiment with many more papers than your printer manufacturer supplies.”

You do not have to have any prior Photoshop experience to benefit from Photoshop CC and Lightroom: A Photographer’s Handbook. And Photoshop works with either Windows or Mac computers, the author points out. Also, many (but not all) of the worfklows and techniques he describes can be used with previous versions of the software products, as well.

Si Dunn