Improving the Test Process – A Study Guide for ISTQB Expert Level Module – #software #bookreview

Improving the Test Process

Implementing Improvement and Change — A Study Guide for the ISTQB Expert Level Module

Graham Bath and Erik van Veenendaal
(Rocky Nook – paperback, Kindle)

If you are a software tester seeking an important new credential to help boost your career, definitely check out this book. Improving the Test Process can help you complete and pass one of the four modules required by the International Software Testing Qualifications Board (ISTQB) to achieve “Expert” certification. (Two of the four “Expert” modules will be available in 2014 and 2015, respectively.)

The ISTQB has established three levels in its Certified Tester program: Foundation, Advanced and Expert. “The result,” the two authors state, “is a structure that supports the development of career paths for professional testers.”

Improving the Test Process has 10 chapters and six appendices devoted to that Expert Level module, including an appendix that focuses on what to expect in the module’s certification exam.

The chapters and appendices are:

  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The Context of Improvement
  • 3. Model-Based Improvement
  • 4. Analytical-Based Improvement
  • 5. Selecting Improvement Approaches
  • 6. Process for Improvement
  • 7. Organization, Roles, and Skills
  • 8. Managing Change
  • 9. Critical Success Factors
  • 10. Adapting to Different Life Cycle Models
  • Appendix A: Glossary
  • Appendix B: Literature and References
  • Appendix C: The Syllabus Parts
  • Appendix D: The Exam
  • Appendix E: Summary of Cognitive Levels (K-Levels)
  • Appendix F: Answers

The “Answers” appendix provides the answers to exercises posted at the end of chapters 2 through 10.

“The definition of a testing expert used by ISTQB,” the authors note, “is ‘a person with the special skills and knowledge representing mastery of a particular testing subject. Being an expert means possessing and displaying special skills and knowledge derived from training and experience.’”

The book’s authors are both long-time professionals in the field of software testing, and they are co-authors of the ISTQB Expert Level syllabus. So they know their subject matter.

In each chapter, they lay out specific learning objectives and follow with technical content and exercises.

Their well-written book is structured so it can be used for two important purposes: (1) as a preparation guide for taking the ISTQB Expert Level certification exam and (2) as a practical guide for experienced testing professionals who want to learn more about how to improve software testing processes.

Si Dunn

Our Beautiful, Fragile World – Excellent photographs by an environmental artist – #bookreview

Peter Essick's new book will inspire photographers to work harder and help readers to better understand the fragility of our planet.

Peter Essick’s new book will inspire photographers to work harder, and it will help readers better understand the fragility of our planet.

Our Beautiful, Fragile World

The Nature and Environmental Photographs of Peter Essick
Peter Essick
(Rocky Nookhardcover, Kindle)

Most of us are content to take a photograph and just settle for what we get under the current circumstances.

That’s not how Peter Essick works.

Essick has spent more than 25 years traveling to remote corners of the world, but also to many spots in North America, as a photographer on assignment for National Geographic.

“Many of my successful photographs,” he writes in his noteworthy new book, “are the result of discovering a scene and then going back several times to get the best picture possible.”

Our Beautiful, Fragile World presents a collection of Essick’s excellent nature and environmental photographs. And almost all of the photos are accompanied by a one-page essay explaining where and how an image was taken, what circumstances surrounded the shot, what environmental issues or crises are represented, and what Essick wants readers to take away from the story behind the photograph.

His book likewise contains a technical information section where specific details of each shot are described, including camera (Nikon or Canon), lens, film (typically Fujichrome 100) or digital camera settings, and how he had to work to get the photograph (i.e., use an underwater housing, or shoot from a light plane, or “look for a place where the sunlight was bounding off the sandstone and reflecting golden light on the opposite wall.”

There also is a fine foreword by Jean-Michael Cousteau, son of the famed, late ocean explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau. “I feel much hope for the future,” he writes, “when I see the talented work of artists like Peter Essick and understand the message he conveys through his stunning environmental images.”

Our Beautiful, Fragile World will inspire almost any photographer to try to take better nature pictures. And it starkly highlights how we continue to run roughshod over the delicate elements and natural forces that keep us alive on this threatened planet.

Si Dunn

Testing Cloud Services – How to Test SaaS, PaaS and IaaS – #cloud #bookreview

Testing Cloud Services

How to Test SaaS, PaaS & IaaS
Kees Blokland, Jeroen Mengerink and Martin Pol
(Rocky Nook – paperback, Kindle)

Cloud computing now affects almost all of us, at least indirectly. But some of us have to deal directly with one or more “clouds” on a regular basis. We select or implement particular cloud services for our employers or for our own businesses. Or, we have to maintain those services and fix any problems encountered by co-workers or employees.

Testing Cloud Services, written by three well-experienced test specialists, emphasizes that the time to begin testing SaaS (Software as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service), or IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) is not after you have made your selections. You should begin testing them during the selection and installation processes and keep testing them regularly once they are live.

“Cloud computing not only poses challenges for testing, it also provides interesting new testing options,” the authors note. “For example, cloud computing can be used for test environments or test tools. It can also mean that all test activities and the test organization as a whole are brought to the cloud. This will be called Testing as a Service.”

Their well-written, six-chapter book deals with numerous topics related to using and testing cloud services, including the role of the test manager, identifying the risks of cloud computing and testing those risks, and picking the right test measures for the chosen services.

In Chapter 5, a significant portion of the book is devoted both to test measures and test management. “Testing SaaS is very different from testing PaaS or IaaS,” the writers state. Much of the lengthy chapter focuses on SaaS, but it also addresses PaaS and IaaS, and the authors describe the following test measures:

  • Testing during selection of cloud services
  • Testing performance
  • Testing security
  • Testing for manageability
  • Testing availability/continuity
  • Testing functionality
  • Testing migrations
  • Testing due to legislation and regulations
  • Testing in production

Particularly if you are a newcomer to choosing, testing, and maintaining cloud services, this book can be an informative and helpful how-to guide.

Si Dunn

The LEGO Build-It Book 1: Amazing Vehicles – Creating with 1 brick collection – #bookreview

The LEGO Build-It Book 1: Amazing Vehicles

Nathanaël Kuipers and Mattia Zamboni
(No Starch Press, paperback)
ISBN: 978-1-59327-503-7

Using just one collection of LEGO bricks and this colorful how-to guide, you can build 10 different model vehicles, starting with a simple go-kart and working your way up to a muscle car, a street rod, and a rescue truck, among others.

No Starch Press recently has launched its LEGO Build-It Book series with this well-crafted volume, aimed at readers age 7 and up. Volume 2, due out in September 2013, will offer another group of 10 construction projects that can be built from just one collection of LEGO bricks.

Many young readers will appreciate the new LEGO book because it has many illustrations that mostly just show,  step by numbered step, how each vehicle goes together.

Nathanaël Kuipers is a Dutch design professional who spent several years working for the LEGO Group in Denmark, where he was mainly responsible for engineering LEGO Technic models. Co-author Mattia Zamboni has a background in graphic design, photography, and LEGO, as well as electrical engineering.

A key message from this book and the evolving Build-It Book series, Kuipers says, is: “You don’t need to buy the really expensive products or lots and lots of sets to make interesting models. With a little creativity and some useful techniques, you can build endless models from a simple collection of bricks.”

Si Dunn

Realm of Racket: Learn to Program, One Game at a Time – #Racket #game #programming #bookreview

Realm of Racket
Learn to Program, One Game at a Time!

Matthias Felleisen, David Van Horn, Conrad Barski, M.D., Forrest Bice, Rose DeMaio, Spencer Florence, Feng-Yun Mimi Lin, Scott Lindeman, Nicole Nussbaum, Eric Peterson, and Ryan Plessner
(No Starch Press – paperback, Kindle)

Formerly known as PLT Scheme, Racket is an offshoot of the Lisp/Scheme family of programming languages. (Lisp, which was first specified in 1958, is the second-oldest high-level programming language, behind FORTRAN).

The (numerous) authors of this 294-page book call Racket “a friendly mutation of Lisp” and tout it as “perfect for all, from those who want to launch their education in computer science to those looking to expand their knowledge and experience in programming.”

Lisp has a long learning curve, so the writers have taken special pains to try to make Racket (“a weird-looking programming language,” they concede) approachable and fun by using comics and games built from short code examples.

Their well-written book is aimed at college freshmen readers. But they emphasize “that doesn’t mean you should drop this book if you are a sophomore or an industry professional.” Nor if you are still in high school or simply like to tinker with programming languages for fun and challenge.

“Regardless of your programming background,” they state, “many of the topics in this book will be new to you, and much of what you’ve learned before will appear in a new light.”

Realm of Racket is structured so that you start out programming very simple games and gradually tackle games that are more complex, while learning about such topics as functions, recursion, lambda, lists, structures, loops, testing, and more.

If you are interested in developing special-purpose computer languages that require specific knowledge of specialized fields, Realm of Racket’s  final chapter briefly delves into the field of language engineering. It notes that Racket “makes it particularly easy to create new programming languages, including special-purpose languages.”

Not surprisingly, some people who program in Racket call themselves Racketeers. The open source language and its program development environment (PDE), DrRacket (“Doctor Racket”), can be downloaded from http://racket-lang.org. “Racket can run on Windows, Mac, and *nix* systems,” the authors note.

Realm of Racket can be a fun, challenging book for computer-savvy teens nearing the end of high school or in their first years of college to study computer science or gaming. Younger readers likely won’t stick with it unless they have some helpful, patient guidance from knowledgeable older siblings or adults. Wait until they’ve gotten reasonably good at another language, such as Python, Ruby, C#, or Java, first.

Si Dunn

Hands-on Testing with PHPUnit How-to – A short, well-focused guide – #programming #bookreview

Instant Hands-on Testing with PHPUnit How-to
A practical guide to getting started with PHPUnit to improve code quality
Michael Lively
(Packt Publishing – paperback, Kindle)

PHPUnit is considered by many to be the leading tool for testing PHP code. This “Short, Fast, Focused” book (82 pages digital, 69 pages in paperback) is a recent addition to Packt Publishing’s “Instant” series. It zeroes in on how to install and use PHPUnit to create and run “easy-to-maintain tests.”

One strength of Michael Lively’s new book is his experience with PHP and PHPUnit. Another strength is the book’s step-by-step structure. It rates each key step as “Simple”, “Intermediate”, or “Advanced” and provides subheadings such as “Getting ready…”, “How to do it…”, “How it works…”, and “There’s more…” to help keep descriptions short and clear.

Code examples and screenshots also help the reader get comfortable with running tests using the PHPUnit framework.

Aside from skipping commas in some of the text, Michael Lively’s writing is clear and concise, and his descriptions and code examples have been reviewed by two experienced software developers.

The book is “written for anyone who has an interest in unit testing but doesn’t necessarily know where to start in integrating it with their project,” Lively states.

“It will provide useful tips and insights into how PHPUnit can be used with your projects and it should give you enough information to whet your appetite for the various features offered by PHPUnit.”

The code examples in Lively’s book “were written using PHP 5.3.24 and PHPUnit 3.7. All code samples were verified against a Linux box with Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.”

As with several other Packt books recently reviewed, if you use a Windows PC or a Mac instead of a Linux system, you pretty much are left on your own to figure out the installation process and certain commands.

–   Si Dunn

Functional JavaScript – Applying functional techniques and Underscore.js – #programming #bookreview

Functional JavaScript
Introducing Functional Programming with Underscore.js
Michael Fogus
(O’Reilly – paperback, Kindle)

When I first started tinkering with JavaScript, object-oriented programming (OOP) was the rage, and JavaScript frequently was touted as one of the key object-oriented languages. After all, according to many online descriptions, almost everything within JavaScript “is OO.”

Now, in this enjoyable new book, JavaScript is hailed as a functional programming language. Of course, functional programming recently has been the rage in many programming circles. And “enjoyable” may seem an odd word to attach to a software text. Yet, it fits. Michael Fogus shows here that he is a technical writer who can be entertaining, effective and well-organized.

“This book,” he states, “is not about spewing dogma regarding the virtues of functional programming. I think there are many functional techniques that offer ways to rein in the complexities of software development, but I realize that at times, there are better ways to implement any given individual part.”

It is possible, of course, to debate object-oriented vs. functional JavaScript until the digital cows are called back home and put into infinite loops. But, for those who don’t know or care much about the differences, here are some basic views.

The Mozilla Developers Network (to simply pick  one example) discusses objected-oriented JavaScript on its site and declares: “Object-oriented programming may be seen as the design of software using a collection of cooperating objects, as opposed to a traditional view in which a program may be seen as a collection of functions, or simply as a list of instructions to the computer. In OOP, each object is capable of receiving messages, processing data, and sending messages to other objects. Each object can be viewed as an independent little machine with a distinct role or responsibility.”

Meanwhile, HaskellWiki offers this explanation of functional programming: “In functional programming, programs are executed by evaluating expressions, in contrast with imperative programming where programs are composed of statements which change global state when executed. Functional programming typically avoids using mutable state.

“Functional programming requires that functions are first-class, which means that they are treated like any other values and can be passed as arguments to other functions or be returned as a result of a function. Being first-class also means that it is possible to define and manipulate functions from within other functions.”

Some of the programming languages typically labeled “functional” include Clojure, OCaml, Erlang,  Haskell, Scala, and F#.

Here is how Michael Fogus defines functional programming:

“As a bare-bones introduction, functional programming can be described in a single sentence:

Functional programming is the use of functions that transform values into units of
abstraction, subsequently used to build software systems.

“This is a simplification bordering on libel,” he continues, “but it’s functional (ha!) for this early stage in the book. The library that I use as my medium of functional expression in JavaScript is Underscore, and for the most part, it adheres to this basic definition.”

(Underscore.js can be obtained from http://underscorejs.org and imported into “the applicable project directories.”)

Fogus refuses, in his text, “to create a false dichotomy and say that functional and object-oriented styles should stand in opposition.” Indeed, he notes that JavaScript supports both models and “systems can and should be composed of both models.”

He also points out that JavaScript can be used with other paradigms, including imperative programming, prototype-based object-oriented programming, and metaprogramming.

“In no way does this book represent even a modicum of original thinking regarding functional programming in JavaScript,” he states. Yet, it is a worthy effort.

It is well written, smoothly organized, and nicely illustrated with short code examples and helpful diagrams. And Fogus notes that JavaScript does have “[l]anguage oddities, unsafe features, and a sea of competing libraries” that raise concerns when it is selected for a project. Functional programming, he contends, can be one way to help ensure that JavaScript “can be not only safe, but also simple to understand and test, in addition to being proportionally scalable to the size of the code base.”

Here is the chapter lineup for Fogus’s 237-page book:

  • Chapter 1. Introducing Functional JavaScript
  • Chapter 2. First-Class Functions and Applicative Programming
  • Chapter 3. Variable Scope and Closures
  • Chapter 4. Higher-Order Functions
  • Chapter 5. Function-Building Functions
  • Chapter 6. Recursion
  • Chapter 7. Purity, Immutability, and Policies for Change
  • Chapter 8. Flow-Based Programming
  • Chapter 9. Programming without Class

Functional JavaScript is a winner on at least two counts: (1) as a how-to text for long-time JavaScript programmers wishing to learn more about functional programming; and (2) as a how-to text for long-time functional programmers desiring to learn more about JavaScript.

The book is not recommended for JavaScript newcomers who are still at the level of typing console.log(“The answer to everything in the universe is 42″). However, experienced beginners can learn from it, and so can those of us who just tinker with JavaScript periodically and use it mainly to work with Node.js, Backbone.js, Ember.js, CoffeeScript, HTML and other choices.

Si Dunn

Book Briefs: Four Works of Fiction & Nonfiction from the American Southwest – #bookreview

A Texas Jubilee: Thirteen Stories from the Lone Star State
James Ward Lee
(TCU Press – paperback, Kindle)

James Ward Lee, former English department chairman at the University of North Texas, has earned his membership in the Texas Literary Hall of Fame the hard way. He has written numerous books, short stories and other well-received works.

A Texas Jubilee, his entertaining and absorbing new short story collection, focuses on life in fictitious Bodark Springs, a small East Texas town, in the 1930s and 1940s.

The interconnected stories often have colorful characters, richly detailed local conflicts, and troubling events such as the arrival of an aged man claiming to be Jesse James and the occasional appearance of a bike messenger who delivers World War II death-notice telegrams. One of the best stories, “A Blue and Gray Christmas,” reflects on a grandmother’s early childhood memories of the Civil War.

Unsolved Mysteries of the Old West
W.C. Jameson
(Taylor Trade - paperback, Kindle)

Many of  writer and treasure hunter W.C. Jameson’s books and articles have entertained readers who love “the Old West and a good mystery.” This second edition contains 21 “baffling” tales that still stir up people’s imaginations and sometimes continue a few disputes.

One of the best of the “unsolved mysteries” in Jameson’s book involves an alien spacecraft that may–or may not–have crashed north of Fort Worth, Texas, in 1897, in the tiny town of Aurora.

On the Edge: Water, Immigration and Politics in the Southwest
Char Miller
(Trinity University Press – paperback, Kindle)

The American Southwest is a hotbed of water-supply controversies and immigration disputes, plus sharp political clashes over how to deal with both major issues.

In On the Edge, former Trinity University history professor Char Miller’s taut, insightful essays zero in on “the American Southwest, a region I have known, loved and misunderstood.” He reflects on San Antonio and Los Angeles and what is happening to “the borderlands that stretch between them.”

He puts special emphasis on sustainability and “the environmental pressures, judicial struggles, social injustices, and economic disparities that have troubled the communities I have resided in.”

Our Lost Border: Essays on Life Amid the Narco-Violence
Edited by Sarah Cortez and Sergio Troncoso
(Arte Publico Press - paperback)

Mexico’s gruesome narcotics wars and heightened U.S. border security efforts have disrupted many economic, cultural and personal ties between the American Southwest and Mexico.

This  eye-opening book’s 12 bilingual essays highlight key losses, including the casual ease with which tourists used to cross the border. One writer notes: “The typical American tourist (including Mexican Americans) had no passport; it wasn’t needed. They often did not plan ahead. People walked or drove across the border at El Paso/Ciudad Juarez, San Diego/Tijuana and…Nogales/Nogales…and found a vibrant restaurant with delicious food and even better music. This happenstance border crossing allowed for adventures and exploring for the day….”

While some of the essays are dispiriting, hope also emerges within this important collection.

Si Dunn

Book Brief: Short screenplay DEATH ORBIT now on Kindle as a one-act play

With my daughter as co-author, I have spun off a micro-budget one-act play from my short science-fiction screenplay DEATH ORBIT. The Kindle version is now available and briefly on sale for $0.99 USD.

DEATH ORBIT: A Play in One Act is set in the future, in the seedy courtroom of an ice-mining colony. A young law student volunteers to defend an indigent prisoner who is facing the death penalty within a system where corporate money rules and the prosecution can get laws changed in minutes, to its favor.

– Si Dunn

death_orbit_cover3

Lunch with Buddha – An entertaining, engrossing, thought-provoking American road-trip novel – #bookreview

Lunch with Buddha
Roland Merullo
(PFP/Ajar, Kindle, paperback)

To be honest, I was not really aware of Roland Merullo until his publisher contacted me offering a review copy of an enticingly titled new novel, Lunch with Buddha.

I could blame my “Who?” reaction on my intense focus toward reviewing technology books over the past two years. And I could blame it on empirical evidence that it’s really tough to sell works of fiction these days.

Indeed, several writers of novels and short story collections have told me they don’t get much publicity help from their publishers. Some also have declared they were taking up self-publishing so they could (a) get their books into print (or its digital equivalent), (b) keep more of their paltry earnings, and (c) try their hand at book promotion. Furthermore, I have data — very hard data — showing that virtually no one on Planet Earth has yet read my novel, Erwin’s Law, nor my experimental novella, Jump.

Thus, bottom line, I have not been paying very close attention to the world of fiction lately.

Immediately, I was impressed  (and jarred) to learn that (1) Roland Merullo’s seventh novel, Breakfast with Buddha, is now in its 14th printing; (2) Lunch with Buddha, published late last year, is his eleventh novel and already in its second printing; AND (3) Lunch with Buddha’s completion and publication was funded, at least in part, with significant Kickstarter contributions from Merullo fans.

Intriguingly, Roland Merullo turned down a six-figure advance from a major publishing house and chose a small, independent publisher to bring out his new book.

So he must be good, right?

He’s better than good, actually. Roland Merullo is one of the best, most entertaining writers I’ve encountered in a long time. Seldom am I hooked by a book’s first few paragraphs. But, in Lunch with Buddha, Merullo blends verbal calmness, clarity, wit and depth to create an engaging, absorbing story that flows smoothly from darkly humorous opening to meaningful end.

His new tale is a road-trip novel that covers an odd, yet very American, route: from Seattle to North Dakota, in a borrowed, battered pickup truck nicknamed “Uma.”

Otto Ringling, a New York editor of culinary books and recent widower, is taking the journey with reluctance, while searching for peace of mind and new meanings for his suddenly altered life.

His traveling companion on the drive is his sister’s former guru, “His Holiness” Volya Rinpoche, a Siberian “semi-Buddhist” who now is the sister’s husband and father of their young daughter, Shelsa. Volya still has many questions and misconceptions about life in these not-so-United States. But he also has an infectious spirit, an unshakable spirituality, and plenty of confidence that all will be well and work out in the end.

Otto, meanwhile, is just trying to get a renewed grip on existence. “One of the side effects of losing a spouse–at least for me–had been a peculiar inability to perform the most mundane tasks,” he says in the book, adding:

“Making plane and hotel reservations, shopping for food, setting out the trash on time–these duties, which ordinarily I would have completed with a practiced ease, now seemed as daunting as the learning of a Chinese dialect. I let things slide. For the first time in family history, bills were paid late. The dry cleaners had to call three times to remind me to pick up my shirts. My children could be harsh with me about these failings, but I took their casual criticisms like a battered old fighter takes punches. I would stand. I was determined to stand. I was determined to stay sane, and love them, and help them envision a new life after our old one had been ripped to pieces.”

While Otto and Volya drive across Washington state, Idaho, Montana, and into North Dakota, Otto’s sister, Cecelia, her young daughter Shelsa, and Otto’s children Anthony (20) and Natasha (22), are all riding Amtrak, taking a separate route. They’ve been to Whidbey Island, off the coast of Washington state, to witness Otto scattering his wife’s ashes. Now they are heading for Dickinson, North Dakota, where Celia and Volya live — in Otto’s view – “on the far side of some line that marked the boundary of ordinary American reality.”

Along the way, Otto and Volya have several humorous–and sometimes troubling–encounters with contemporary American culture and values. Otto, for example, tries to explain to Volya the meanings of some strange signs they see along the highway, such as “REPTILE ZOO AND EXPRESSO” and “EAT BIG FOOD.”

Otto and Volya also have debates over religion and spirituality as the widower seeks understandable meanings he can attach to life, death, and whatever lies beyond our mystery-shrouded finality. For example:

 “What is the goal?” I asked, trying to slip away from it. “What’s the whole point? Enlightenment? Eternal life? What?”

He patted me on the shoulder for the millionth time, and said, “You purify. You go and go. Life cuts you and you try and try and try and pretty soon–”

“You become beautiful.”

“Yes. Good.”

“But toward what are we going and going? What does the beauty look like?”

He shrugged almost helplessly, and for a moment I was gripped hard by the hand of doubt. He seemed only an ordinary man then, and I wanted more than that from him, more than cryptic answers and shrugs. A small inner voice suggested he’d been fooling us all these years, playing a role, maybe even working a scam.

“I can show you,” he said. “I can’t tell you.”

“All right. Please show me, then. I’m having a crisis of faith. I’m a little bit lost.”

He nodded sympathetically. “We find you,” he said. “Don’t worry too much….”

Lunch with Buddha has the same key characters as Roland Merullo’s best-selling Breakfast with Buddha. And a third book, aptly titled Dinner with Buddha, is said to be in the works.

Fortunately, Lunch is written so it can be picked up and immediately enjoyed by those who have not previously read Breakfast. Indeed, Lunch with Buddha will make many readers go back and devour Breakfast, then eagerly anticipate Dinner–and check out some of Roland Merullo’s other works of fiction and nonfiction while waiting for the next serving.

Geoffrey Chaucer and Jack Kerouac are the two names that  pop most quickly to mind when the debate topic is “classic road-trip novels.”  I move that we now add Roland Merullo to that short, but esteemed, list.

Si Dunn