Mastering Gamification – A 30-day strategy to enhance customer engagement – #business #bookreview

 

Mastering Gamification

Customer Engagement in 30 Days

Scot Harris and Kevin O’Gorman

(Impackt Publishing – Kindle, paperback)

 Gamification is now a popular buzz word in many parts of the business world. This book wisely does not try to cover every angle, but stays focused on one application: “Marketing and sales people are using gamification to improve customer loyalty and engagement, knowing that it will lead to increased profitability,” the authors write.

They emphasize that “gamifying does not mean turning your business or website into a game. As Gamification.org defines it, gamifying is:

‘The presence or addition of game-like characteristics in anything
that has not been traditionally considered a game.’

 “Take particular note of the word ‘characteristics’ in this phrase,” the authors point out . “The purpose of gamifying is not to turn something into a game, but to apply understanding and knowledge about the basic human desires we all have that make us like games to a non-gaming environment, and hopefully to improve our businesses.”

 You may not finish all of the exercises, nor follow all of the suggestions in this well-written book. Yet the well-structured, 30-day plan offered by Harris and O’Gorman still can help you think harder about your business, how customers see it and how they engage–or don’t engage–with the products or services you offer.

 Even if you operate a small enterprise where you are the entire staff, this book can offer some good ideas and useful tips that can help you make more sales and keep customers coming back.

 What the authors aim to do is help you create and “launch a long-range, ongoing, continuous process of attracting the attention of a target audience, drawing them into a social space built around you and your products or services, encouraging them to evangelize about your products or services, and instilling in them an unshakable sense of loyalty.”

 In other words, you learn how to use some gamification techniques to get customers’ attention, keep their attention, and keep them coming back for more of whatever you are selling–three major keys to long-term survival and growth in business.

Si Dunn

Enterprise Games – How to build a better 21st-century business with game mechanics – #business #bookreview

Enterprise Games: Using Game Mechanics to Build a Better Business
Michael Hugos
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

Can 21st-century games and gamers attack and destroy the top-down, assembly-line thinking that still keeps many businesses firmly rooted in the previous century?

 Michael Hugos’ compelling new book makes a solid case that they can. Game mechanics, he argues, can reshape how workers work, how organizations are managed, and how business goals get accomplished in today’s volatile global economy.

“Games and the associated technology we currently refer to as video games offer us more than just a diversion and escape from difficult times,” contends Hugos. “They offer us field-tested models to use for organizing companies and performing complex and creative tasks. They offer clear and compelling examples for how people can work together, build their careers, and earn a living in rapidly changing and unpredictable environments.”

Hugos, principal at the Center for Systems Innovation, offers his well-written views in a 199-page book “loosely divided into three parts.”

Part One focuses on “ideas and case studies to illustrate how games can provide operating models to follow for redesigning work.”

Part Two presents “a discussion of games and game mechanics that are relevant to the way work is done.” He includes “specific examples, pictures, and case studies to show how game techniques and technologies can be applied to the design of new business systems and workflows.”

Part Three “describes business and social impacts of combining technology from video games with in-house corporate systems, consumer technology, and cloud computing. The book concludes with a discussion about where this is all going and what it might mean for the future of work.”

During the coming months, Enterprise Games may spur many discussions and arguments at all levels of enterprise. And these may lead to some business-model reorganizations not only in Corporate America but elsewhere in the interconnected global economy.

For these changes to happen, however, many company leaders will have to stop thinking “top down” and learn to adapt “the four traits of a game…goal, rules, feedback system, and voluntary participation” to how they to structure and operate a business.

“We all have a sense of what a game is,” Hugos notes. But most of us also have been taught that “play” is not “work.” Enterprise Games shows how the two concepts can be brought together in ways that can make companies more competitive and more profitable in these uncertain times.

Si Dunn

Gamification by Design – Implementing Game Mechanics in Web and Mobile Apps – #bookreview

Gamification by Design: Implementing Game Mechanics in Web and Mobile Apps
By Gabe Zichermann and Christopher Cunningham
(O’Reilly, $24.99, paperback; $9.99, Kindle)

Many companies which sell us products and services are rushing to try to adapt successful videogame strategies to their sales techniques.

This well-written and adequately illustrated book encourages companies to view consumers as “players” rather than “customers” or “users.” In the co-authors’ view: “By thinking of our clients as players, we shift our frame of mind toward their engagement with our products and services. Rather than looking at the immediacy of a single financial transaction, we are considering a long-term and symbiotic union wrapped in a ribbon of fun.”

“Gamification,” the writers emphasize, “…is the marketing buzzword of our time,” and it “can mean different things to different people.”

In their book, it means “the design strategy and tactics you need to integrate game mechanics into any kind of consumer-facing website or mobile app.”

The co-authors also state that their overall goal is “to help demystify some of the core concepts of game design as they apply to business” and that they have structured their book from “the perspective of what a marketer, product manager, or strategist would want to know.”

They define game mechanics as “the tools used to create games,” and game dynamics as “how players interact with game experiences.”

The two writers, both gamification experts, stress that gamification cannot fix core problems within a business. And bad products or products that don’t fit well into a particular market will not get a sales boost if game mechanics and game design are applied to sales campaigns. One hypothetical example they cite is trying to create “a world where your consumer’s avatar is chasing gremlins with an AK-47 in order to save the spaghetti sauce your company is trying to sell in outer space.”

Gamification by Design is not about showing you how to create actual games. Instead, it is more about using gamification to enhance customer engagement and loyalty to your products or services.

The chapter line-up shows the scope of this 182-page book:

  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1: Foundations
  • Chapter 2: Player Motivation
  • Chapter 3: Game Mechanics: Designing for Engagement (Part I)
  • Chapter 4: Game Mechanics: Designing for Engagement (Part II)
  • Chapter 5: Game Mechanics and Dynamics in Greater Depth
  • Chapter 6: Gamification Case Studies
  • Chapter 7: Tutorial: Coding Basic Game Mechanics
  • Chapter 8: Tutorial: Using an Instant Gamification Platform
  • Index (12 pages)

Once the basic game mechanics and structures are introduced, the reader is presented with more information on how “[p]oints, badges, levels, leader-boards, challenges, and rewards can be remixed in limitless ways to create a spectrum of experiences.” And the book moves into deeper discussions of game mechanics and game dynamics.

Feedback, for example, is the process of “returning information to players and informing them of where they are at the present time, ideally against a continuum of progress.” In the toolbox of game mechanics, “[f]eedback loops are essential parts of all games, and they are seen most frequently in the interplay between scores and levels. As scores increase during an experience, they provide clear and unambiguous feedback to the player that she is heading in the ‘right’ direction.”

The book includes case studies focusing successful use of gamification by Yahoo!, Nike and Quora. It also offers up some examples of bad efforts at gamifying a website.

While Gamification by Design keeps its focus away from actually designing and creating games, it does give the reader the architecture and code needed to gamify a basic consumer site. It also shows how to use “mainstream APIs [application programming interfaces] from Badgeville,”

Noting that badges have motivated military warriors and Boy Scouts for hundreds of years, the co-authors contend that offering electronic badges as rewards and status symbols on websites “are [for game designers] an excellent way to encourage social promotion of their products and services. Badges also mark the completion of goals and the steady progress of play within the system.”

This is a fine standalone book, but it also can be used in conjunction with O’Reilley’s Gamification Master Class and with “the supplemental videos, exercises, challenges, and resources available at http://www.GamificationU.com.”

Si Dunn

#