New Books for Windows Phone 7 & 7.5 and Microsoft SQL Server 2012 T-SQL – #bookreview

Microsoft Press recently has released two new books, one for developers who work with Windows Phone 7 & 7.5 and the other for newcomers to Microsoft SQL Server 2012 T-SQL. 

Windows Phone 7 Development Internals
Andrew Whitechapel
(Microsoft Press, paperback, Kindle)

Andrew Whitechapel’s hefty new 809-page development internals guidebook focuses on Windows Phone 7 design and architecture and helps you learn best practices for building Windows Phone 7 applications. It is illustrated with numerous screenshots, code examples, and other illustrations.

The book “covers the breadth of application development for the Windows Phone platform, both the major 7 and 7.1/7.5 versions and the minor 7.1.1 version,” Whitechapel writes.

Windows Phone 7 Development Internals is aimed at experienced .NET developers who are familiar with Microsoft Silverlight and want to dig into Windows Phone’s platform design and API surface.

“The Windows Phone 7 release only supports C#,” Whitechapel notes, “and although support for Visual Basic was introduced with the 7.1 SDK, this book focuses purely on C# and XAML.”

In each of the 20 chapters, several features are introduced, and Whitechapel provides “one or more sample [Silverlight] applications and walks you through the significant code (C# and XAML).”

The book’s author is a senior program manager for the Windows Phone Application Platform.

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Microsoft SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Fundamentals
Itzik Ben-Gan
(Microsoft Press, paperback, Kindle)

Transact-SQL, more commonly known as T-SQL, is the Microsoft SQL Server dialect of the ISO and ANSI standards for SQL. T-SQL code is used to query and modify data in SQL Server 2012.

Itzik Ben-Gan, one of the leading experts on T-SQL, emphasizes that his new book “covers fundamentals [and] is mainly aimed at T-SQL practitioners with little or no experience.” But others who have some T-SQL experience also can find it helpful for filling in gaps in knowledge. The book also is recommended for database administrators, business intelligence (BI) practitioners, report writer, analysts, architects, and SQL Server power users who have “just started working with SQL Server and need to write queries and develop code using Transact-SQL.”

Microsoft SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Fundamentals is structured into 10 chapters. The first chapter provides “Background to T-SQL Querying and Programming. Chapters 2 through 8 examine “various aspects of querying and modifying data.” Chapter 9 looks at concurrency and transactions, and Chapter 10 provides an overview of programmable objects.

The book’s one appendix shows you how to “get started and set up your environment so that you have everything you need to get the most out of this book.” The major discussions include: “Getting Started with SQL Database”; “Installing an On-Premises Implementation of SQL Server”; “Downloading Source Code and Installing the Sample Database”; “Working with SQL Server Management Studio”; and “Working with SQL Server Books Online.”

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Si Dunn

Training Kit (Exam 70-462): Administering Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Databases – #bookreview #mcsa

Training Kit (Exam 70-462): Administering Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Databases
Orin Thomas, Peter Ward, and boB Taylor
(Microsoft Press, paperback with CD)

Exam 70-462 is one of three required examinations you must pass to get a Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA) certification for Microsoft SQL Server 2012.

This well-structured, 593-page book is designed for self-paced training and includes a CD with practice tests. The CD offers several testing modes to choose from and hundreds of test questions. The text is amply illustrated with screenshots, bullet points and numbered steps, and each lesson concludes with a lesson summary and lesson review. Answers to the lesson review questions are at the back of the book, and explanations also are provided for why the incorrect answers are wrong.

The book’s introduction covers such topics as system requirements, practice setup instructions, errata and book support links, and how to prepare for the exam.

The book’s 12 chapters focus on the following topics:

  1. Planning and Installing SQL Server 2012
  2. Configuring and Managing SQL Server Instances
  3. Configuring SQL Server 2012 Components
  4. Migrating, Importing, and Exporting
  5. SQL Server Logins, Roles, and Users
  6. Securing SQL Server 2012
  7. Mirroring and Replication
  8. Clustering and AlwaysOn
  9. Troubleshooting SQL Server 2012
  10. Indexes and Concurrency
  11. SQL Server Agent, Backup, and Restore
  12. Code Case Studies

The authors caution that you should consider this study guide just “one part of your exam preparation plan. You require meaningful, real-world experience with SQL Server 2012 to pass this exam.”

They also recommend using Hyper-V, a feature of Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Widows Server 2012, and certain editions of Windows 8, “[t]o minimize the time and expense of configuring physical computers for this training kit. You can use other virtualization software instead, but the instructions are written assuming that you are using a solution that supports 64-bit operating systems hosted as virtual machines.”

Si Dunn

Understanding IPv6, 3rd Edition – Welcome to the new, improved & BIGGER Internet – #bookreview #microsoft #windows

Understanding IPv6, 3rd Edition
Joseph Davies
(Microsoft Press, paperback, list price $49.99; Kindle edition, list price $39.99)

The Internet can now expand into a much bigger realm than was possible before the worldwide launch of IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6) on June 6, 2012.

The web most of us use has long relied on IPv4, the circa-1981 Internet Protocol built around 32-bit addresses. This scheme can accommodate approximately 4.3 billion unique addresses worldwide. On a planet where (1) the population now has surpassed 7 billion and (2) many of us now have multiple devices connected to the Web, Internet Protocol version 4 recently has been in dire danger of running out of unique addresses.

IPv6 will fix that problem and offer several important new enhancements, as long as we don’t find ways to expand the Internet to parallel universes or to the people on a few trillion distant planets. IPv6 uses a 128-bit addressing scheme that can accommodate more than 340 trillion trillion trillion unique addresses. So go ahead. Get online with that second iPad, third smart phone or fourth laptop.

IPv4 and IPv6 are now running in a dual stack that supports both addressing schemes. The transition from IPv4 to IPv6 is not seamless, however. A lot of work remains to be done by major Internet service providers (ISPs), web companies, hardware manufacturers, network equipment providers and many others to enable IPv6 on their products and services.

Joseph Davies, author of Understanding IPv6, has been writing about IPv6 since 1999. His new 674-page third edition provides both a detailed overview of IPv6 and a detailed focus on how to implement it, within a limited range of Windows products.

“There are,” he notes, “different versions of the Microsoft IPv6 protocol for Windows….I have chosen to confine the discussion to the IPv6 implementation in Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2008, Windows 8, Windows 7, and Windows Vista.”

This well-written and well-organized book is not for beginners. Its intended audience includes:

  • Windows networking consultants and planners
  • Microsoft Windows network administrators
  • Microsoft Certified Systems Engineers (MCSEs) and Microsoft Certified Trainers (MCTs)
  • General technical staff
  • Information technology students

Davies and Microsoft offer downloadable companion content for this book: Microsoft Network Monitor 3.4 (a network sniffer for capturing and viewing frames); and PowerPoint 2007 training slides that can be used along with the book to teach IPv6.

If you need a guide to best practices for using IPv6 in a Windows network, definitely consider getting Understanding IPv6, 3rd Edition.

Si Dunn

Introducing Windows Server 2012 – A guide to what’s coming in a much-anticipated release – #bookreview #microsoft

Introducing Windows Server® 2012
Mitch Tulloch with the Microsoft Server Team
(Microsoft Press, paperback, list price $14.99; Kindle edition,
list price $0.00)

 The anticipated release date for the new version of Microsoft Server®  is sometime between the third quarter of 2012 and early 2013. And this book’s introduction hails it as “probably the most significant release of the Windows Server platform ever.”

Windows Server® 2012, it states, will offer “an innovative new user interface, powerful new management tools, enhanced Windows PowerShell support, and hundreds of new features in the areas of networking, storage and virtualization.”

There also will be major emphasis on cloud computing. The product has been “designed for the cloud from the ground up and provides a foundation for building both public and private cloud solutions,” the book declares.

Introducing Windows Server® 2012 is “based on beta,” according to the cover disclaimer. And, according to the author, the book  “represents a ‘first look’ based on the public beta release of Windows Server 2012 and is intended to help IT professionals familiarize themselves with the capabilities of the new platform.”

The 235-page book is divided into five chapters:

  • Chapter 1 presents “The business need for Windows Server® 2012.” Not surprisingly, the main focus is on cloud computing and multi-server platforms.
  • Chapter 2’s focus is “Foundation for building your private cloud” and how the new product can provide “a solid foundation for building dynamic, highly scalable, multi-tenant cloud environments.”
  • Chapter 3 looks at the Windows Server® 2012 features and capabilities that can create a “[h]ighly available, easy-to-manage multi-server platform.”
  • Chapter 4 discusses how you can use the product to “[d]eploy web applications on premises and in the cloud,” with its “scalable and elastic web platform” and “[s]upport for open standards.”
  • Chapter 5 focuses on Windows Server® 2012 features and capabilities that are key to “[e]nabling the modern workstyle.” The author states: “Today’s business users want things simple. They want to be able to access their desktop applications, and data virtually anywhere, from any device, and have the full Windows experience. And from an IT perspective, this must be done securely and in ways that can ensure compliance at all times.”

Since this book is a “first look” written prior to the ready-to-manufacture (RTM) date, some of its screenshots, feature descriptions and stated capabilities may differ somewhat from the product that will be released.

But this overview can be a useful – and inexpensive — guide to have handy while considering whether to move to, or upgrade to, Windows Server® 2012.

Si Dunn

Oh, Say Can You C#? – C# 5.0 in a Nutshell & C# 5.0 Pocket Reference -#programming #bookreview

O’Reilly recently has released two handy and helpful books for practitioners and students of the C# object-oriented programming language. One is a hefty, 1042-page “definitive reference” that (in paperback format) can double as a handy weight for physical exercise. The other is a compact, 215-page reference that really does fit in a coat pocket or pants pocket (but not a typical shirt pocket, unless you happen to wear an XXL, or larger, shirt).

Starting first with the muscle-building reference guide that weighs in at nearly three pounds…

C# 5.0 in a Nutshell, 5th Edition
Joseph Albahari and Ben Albahari
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $49.99; Kindle edition, list price $39.99)

This latest Nutshell edition covers C# 5.0, “the fourth major update to Microsoft’s flagship programming language, an update that positions C# “as a language with unusual flexibility and breadth,” the authors state.

They note: “At one end, it [C#] offers high-level abstractions, such as query expressions and asynchronous continuations, while at the other end, it provides low-level power through constructions such as custom value types and the optional use of pointers.”

The revised and expanded new edition “covers C#, the CLR [Common Language Runtime], and the core Framework assemblies. The authors have chosen this focus “to allow space for difficult topics such as concurrency, security and application domains—without compromising depth or readability.” It’s hard to argue with the “depth” of a book 1,000+ pages long. And the book is written clearly, with numerous short code examples to illustrate its points.

C# 5.0 in a Nutshell is aimed at readers with intermediate to expert knowledge of programming, but no prior knowledge of C# is assumed. Indeed, chapters two through four provide an introduction to C# basics, starting just above the “Hello, World” level with a program that multiplies 12 times 30. The remaining chapters cover advanced C# 5.0 topics and the core .NET framework. With just a few exceptions, you can read these chapters randomly.

The hefty book has a hefty index. It has been “shaped by more than 20 expert reviewers,” including several from Microsoft. And the authors have solid backgrounds in their subject matter.

And now, for something a bit lighter…

C# 5.0 Pocket Reference
Joseph Albahari and Ben Albahari
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $19.99; Kindle edition, list price $11.99)

The Nutshell authors have boiled their big book down to a very practical aid that you can easily carry to work, class or your favorite coffee shop or when traveling. Conveniently, the Pocket Reference still includes an introduction to C# 5.0’s fundamentals, starting with the simple multiplication program. It also covers many advanced topics, ranging from operator overload and Language Integrated Query (LINQ) to preprocessor directives, custom attributes, and XML documentation.

This book is not organized by chapters, so you will find yourself making frequent use of the book’s two-page table of contents and 12-page index, particularly if you are new to C# 5.0.

But you can readily find brief explanations, code samples and illustrations that define and clarify much of what you are seeking. And you will appreciate the book’s convenient size.

Si Dunn

MOS Study Guide for Microsoft Office 365 – MOS Exam 77-891, Coming Soon – #bookreview

MOS Study Guide for Microsoft Office 365
John Pierce
(Microsoft Press, paperback, list price $11.99)

 A Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) is someone who has, according to the author, “demonstrated proficiency by passing a certification exam in one or more Microsoft Office applications, including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, Access, and OneNote, as well as SharePoint and Office 365.”

If you specifically want to earn a Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification in Microsoft Office 365, John Pierce’s new book is the official study guide for the test.

This 205-page book covers Office 365 MOS Exam 77-891, which will be released sometime in fall 2012.

The study guide is divided into four chapters that are well-organized, cleanly written, and adequately illustrated. The chapters are:

  • Navigating Office 365
  • Communicating by Using Office 365 Outlook Web App
  • Communicating by Using Lync Online
  • Managing Sites in SharePoint Online

Pierce states that the Outlook Web App and SharePoint Online provide “the foundation for your team site” when using Office 365 in a multiuser environment. The Outlook Web App “is the online version of the desktop e-mail, scheduling, and contact management application.” SharePoint’s uses include “managing shared content, tracking tasks, posting announcements, and managing business workflows.” Lync Online, meanwhile, is an excellent tool “for collaborating on content in real time,” as well as sending emails or instant messages.

“Candidates for MOS-level certification are expected to successfully complete a wide range of standard business tasks,” Pierce says, and “[s]uccessful candidates generally have six or more months of experience with a specific Office application, including either formal, instructor-led training or self-study using MOS-approved books, guides or interactive computer-based materials.”

Even if you use Office 365 in a one-person small business, or if you have not yet decided to pursue an Office 365 certification, this inexpensive book can help you get a solid handle on how to use the product’s three key online applications.

Purchasers of MOS Study Guide for Microsoft Office 365 are offered a 25% discount on the MOS 77-891 exam fee from Certiport.

Si Dunn

Inside Windows Debugging: Practical Debugging and Tracing Strategies – #bookreview #in #programming

Inside Windows Debugging: Practical Debugging and Tracing Strategies
Tarik Soulami
(Microsoft Press,
paperback, list price $39.99; Kindle edition, list price $31.99)

Debugging and tracing tools — and the willingness and strategies to use them — should be key aspects of any software development and testing process.

Inside Windows Debugging is intended for software engineers who want to “perfect their mastery of Windows as a development platform through the use of debugging and tracing tools.”

Yet anyone serious about learning, using and supporting Windows can benefit from this book. Its first few chapters provide basic explanations of debugging and tracing tools and how to acquire the right packages and use them. From there, the author presents and explains numerous code examples that demonstrate many types of bugs and related problems in software. So it is helpful to have at least a little experience with C/C++ and C# programming languages.

Inside Windows Debugging has 560 pages, including an extensive index, and is divided into three parts: (1) “A Bit of Background”; (2) “Debugging for Fun and Profit”; and (3) “Observing and Analyzing Software Behavior.” Two appendices sum up common debugging tasks and show how to accomplish them using the WinDbg debugger.

To run the software and examples used in this book, you should have “Windows Vista or later.”

The author, however, “highly” recommends at least having Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2. And in some of the kernel debugging exercises, a second computer will be needed to serve as a host kernel-mode debugger machine.

Si Dunn

For developers and system administrators: Windows Internals, Part 1, 6th Edition – #bookreview

Windows Internals, Part 1 – 6th Edition
Mark Russinovich, David A. Solomon, Alex Ionescu
(Microsoft Press, paperback, list price $39.99; Kindle edition, list price $31.99)

This latest Windows Internals guide is being released in two parts that are “fully updated for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.”

“Updating the book for each release of Windows takes considerable time so producing it in two parts allows us to publish the first part earlier,” according to Microsoft Press and the authors.

Part 1 is now available. Meanwhile, Part 2 is scheduled to be released sometime this fall.

Part 1 has 726 pages and is divided into seven chapters:

  • Concepts and Tools
  • System Architecture
  • System Mechanisms
  • Management Mechanisms
  • Processes, Threads, and Jobs
  • Security
  • Networking

Part 2, once it becomes available, will offer these seven additional chapters:

  • I/O System
  • Storage Management
  • Memory Management
  • Cache Management
  • File Systems
  • Startup and Shutdown
  • Crash Dump Analysis

Both parts of Windows Internals, Sixth Edition, are aimed at advanced computer professionals (developers and system administrators) “who want to understand how the core components of the Microsoft Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 RS operating systems work internally.”

Such knowledge can help developers “better comprehend the rationale behind design choices when building applications specific to the Windows platform,” the authors note. For system administrators, having a deeper understanding of how the operating system works “facilitates understanding the performance behavior of the system and makes troubleshooting system problems much easier when things go wrong.”

The book is heavily illustrated with screenshots, tables, diagrams and other illustrations.

And it features a number of hands-on experiments to help you dig deeper into how Windows works inside, using tools such as “the kernel debugger and tools from Sysinternals and Winsider Seminars & Solutions.”

What Part 1 and the forthcoming Part 2 will not do, the authors point out, is “describe how to use, program, or configure Windows.”

– Si Dunn

Security and Privacy for Microsoft Office 2010 Users – #bookreview #in

Security and Privacy for Microsoft Office 2010 Users
Mitch Tulloch
(Microsoft Press,
paperback, list price $9.99; Kindle edition, $0.00)
 

If you work for a company that uses Microsoft Office products, or if you have them in your own business, you may be concerned about security and privacy as you publish documents, download documents or collaborate on projects online. Indeed, there may be formal security and privacy restrictions in place.

At the same time, because of workload, you may have little time for formal training in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. And you may not get much guidance on how you are supposed to comply with your employer’s restrictions. Indeed, you may be required and expected to just learn this stuff on your own.

This handy 84-page guidebook can help. Using typical office scenarios, it covers a number of everyday topics. These include working with Protected View, removing private information from documents, signing documents digitally, marking documents as final so they can’t be modified, encrypting documents, password-only access to documents, and restricting who can edit a document.

Security and Privacy for Microsoft Office 2010 Users is recommended for intermediate-level users of Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. But the examples and illustrations are clear enough for Microsoft Office newcomers, as well.

Si Dunn

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Three new specialized how-to books for SharePoint, JQuery & Mac OS X Lion Server – #bookreview #in #programming

Here are three new books for those with at least some basic to intermediate experience with Microsoft SharePoint, or web development, or Mac OS X Lion.

Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Creating and Implementing Real-World Projects
By Jennifer Mason, Christian Buckley, Brian T. Jackett, and Wes Preston
(Microsoft Press,
paperback, list price $34.99; Kindle edition, list price $27.99)

If you have some background in Microsoft SharePoint and want to dig deeper, this book can help you learn how to use SharePoint to create real-world solutions to ten common business problems.

Each chapter is devoted to a single project, such as creating a FAQ system to help users quickly find answers to their questions, setting up a help desk solution to track service requests, or building a simple project management system.

The projects are based on “various scenarios encountered by the authors as we have used SharePoint as a tool to build solutions that address business needs….Each of the solutions has been implemented in one or more organization,” they state.

Do not jump into Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Creating and Implementing Real-World Projects until you have gained “a general understanding of the basics of SharePoint,” the authors caution. And note that SharePoint is not easily defined as one “type” of product.

If you keep in mind the process of building a house, they write, “SharePoint is like the various tools and materials, and the final business solutions you build are like the house. There are many features and tools in SharePoint, and within this book, you will see different ways to combine and structure them into business solutions.”

Their 403-page book is well written and cleanly organized with short paragraphs and many headings, step lists and illustrations. It also has an extensive index.

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JQuery: Novice to Ninja, 2nd Edition
By Earle Castledine and Craig Sharkie
(SitePoint,
paperback, list price $39.95; Kindle edition, list price $29.95)

Technology changes fast, and web developers curious about JQuery will welcome this updated edition of Earle Castledine’s and Craig Sharkie’s book that first appeared in 2010.

This also is not a book for beginners. “You should,” the authors note, “already have intermediate to advanced HTML and CSS skills, as JQuery uses CSS-style selectors to zero in on page elements. Some rudimentary programming knowledge will be helpful to have,” they add, “as JQuery—despite its clever abstractions—is still based on JavaScript.” 

The authors offer high praise for the power of JQuery: “Aside from being a joy to use, one of the biggest benefits of JQuery is that it handles a lot of infuriating cross-browser issues for you. Anyone who has written serious JavaScript in the past can attest that cross-browser inconsistencies will drive you mad.”

They describe how to download and include the latest version of JQuery in web pages. And their book is organized to introduce JQuery features and code examples while also showing you, step by step, how to build a complete working application.

JQuery: Novice to Ninja, 2nd Edition has plenty of illustrations and is well indexed and written in a friendly, approachable style. 

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Using Mac OS X Lion Server
By Charles Edge
(O’Reilly,
paperback, list price $29.99; Kindle edition, list price $23.99)

Yes, intermediate and advanced system administrators will find some useful information in this well-written and nicely illustrated guide.

“But the book,” says author Charles Edge, “is really meant for new system administrators: the owner of the small business, the busy parent trying to manage all of those iPhone and iPads the kids are running around with, the teacher with a classroom full of iMacs or iPads, and of course, the new podcaster, just looking for a place to host countless hours of talking about the topic of her choice.”

What Using Mac OS X Lion Server  does not cover is “managing a Lion Server from the command line, scripting client management, or other advanced topics.”

The topics it does cover include: Planning for and installing a server; sharing and backing up files; sharing address books, calendars, and iChat; Wikis, webs and blogs; building a mail server; building a podcasting server; managing Apple computers and iOS devices; network services; and deploying Mac OS X computers.

The author cautions: “In many ways, the traditional system administrator will find Lion challenging in its consumeristic approach. There is a lot of power under the hood, but the tools used to manage the server have been simplified so that anyone can manage it, not just veteran Unix gods.”

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir. He is the author of an e-book detective novel, Erwin’s Law, now also available in paperback, plus a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.