Enterprise Application Development with Ext JS and Spring – (And a lot more!) – #programming #bookreview

Enterprise Application Development with Ext JS and Spring

Develop and deploy a high-performance Java web application using Ext JS and Spring

Gerald Gierer

(Packt Publishing paperback, Kindle)

A powerful JavaScript web framework such as Ext JS deserves a powerful platform for enterprise desktop application development. Gerald Gierer delivers a good one in his well-crafted new how-to book from Packt Publishing.

Gierer’s book is a bit unusual in today’s pare-it-down marketplace. It contains many before, during and after screen prints to illustrate the actions and outcomes of steps and commands. The 446-page book also has lengthy code listings that enable you to check and verify the outcomes of code changes you have made.

Ext JS and the Spring framework, however, are just a few of the packages that you work with as you set up your development tools and create, modify, expand, test and deploy a sample enterprise application (a task time tracker).

The other programs and tools include MySQL, the Java SE development kit (with the new Java API for JSON), NetBeans, Maven, Glassfish, and JUnit. And, with Ext JS, you learn to work with the Sencha Cmd tool and the Ext JS Software Development Kit (SDK).

But please note, particularly if you are new to some of this : You must pay careful attention to each paragraph as you load and configure software and as you keep building and enhancing your enterprise application.

In this book, it is easy start jumping from one screen print to the next, or from one code listing to the next, while skipping the intervening text. When you do, you can miss key steps that sometimes are buried without highlights in the wording.

This was my first time to work with some of the required software packages, so I had to force myself to really slow down and pay close attention to each paragraph, as well as each graphic.  My initial development attempt went off the rails when I discovered, more than 100 pages into the book, that I had misconfigured a couple of tables, skipped a couple of data changes, and generally screwed up the database. And, being new to some of the software, I couldn’t figure out to repair everything. So I simply started over from scratch and this time moved carefully from one page to the next, closely checking code entries and the book’s text before clicking “Enter.” That made all the difference in my results.

If you are looking to do enterprise application development with a JavaScript framework, definitely consider Ext JS and definitely consider Gerald Gierer’s fine Enterprise Application Development with Ext JS and Spring.

And definitely take your time as you work your way through his book.

Si Dunn

Learning PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, and CSS, 2nd Edition – Dynamic websites #programming #bookreview

Learning PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, and CSS, 2nd Edition
Robin Nixon
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

Robin Nixon recently has updated and expanded his popular 2009 “step-by-step guide to creating dynamic websites.” The new edition has an added section that focuses on Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), so the book “now covers all four of the most popular web development technologies.”

Nixon notes: “The real beauty of PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, and CSS is the way in which they all work together to produce dynamic web content: PHP handles the main work on the web server, MySQL manages all of the data, and the combination of CSS and JavaScript looks after web page presentation. JavaScript can also talk with your PHP code on the web server whenever it needs to update something (either on the server or on the web page).”

The book’s opening chapters introduce (1) what dynamic web content means and (2) how to set up a development server on your Windows PC, Mac, or Linux machine. After that, Learning PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, & CSS, 2nd Edition follows the structure outlined by its title. First, you get a five-chapter tutorial on PHP programming. Then, two chapters show how to use MySQL. One additional chapter shows how to access MySQL using PHP, and two related chapters deal with (1) form handling and (2) cookies, sessions and authentication, using PHP and MySQL.

Three chapters introduce JavaScript programming. A fourth chapter covers “JavaScript and PHP Validation and Error Handling.” And one additional chapter describes “how to implement Ajax using JavaScript.”

Ajax, Nixon explains, “not only substantially reduces the amount of data that must be sent back and forth [between a browser and a server] but also makes web pages seamlessly dynamic, allowing them to behave more like self-contained applications.”

CSS gets its turn next, with an introductory chapter, a chapter on advanced CSS with CSS3, and a chapter on accessing CSS from JavaScript.

Finally, in the “Bringing It All Together” chapter, Nixon shows how to build a simple social networking site, using all of the tools introduced in the book.

Learning PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, & CSS, 2nd Edition is an excellent how-to guide for web development beginners who have moderate computer skills and a little bit of experience with HTML and static web pages. The book is nicely written and well-illustrated, and the code examples generally are easy to follow. Screen shots and other descriptions of expected results also can help keep you moving forward on the right path.

No book can cover everything you need to know, of course, particularly when several different types of software are involved. You may need occasional help from someone who has used one or more of the described programs. And some of the screen examples may appear a bit different on your machine as new software updates are released. But Robin Nixon’s updated edition can take you a long way toward the goal of learning how to design, create, post, and maintain dynamic web pages, using free, open source tools.

Si Dunn

PHP & MySQL: Novice to Ninja, 5th Ed. – A popular how-to guide updated – #bookreview #in #php #programming

PHP & MySQL: Novice to Ninja, 5th Edition
Kevin Yank
(SitePoint,
paperback, list price $39.95; Kindle edition, list price $29.95)

A key measure of a programming book’s usefulness and popularity is how many times it has been revised and reprinted.

Kevin Yank’s book first was published in 2001 under a different title. Eleven years later, his newly revised fifth edition is now in print and providing up-to-date hands-on guidance for those who want to use PHP and MySQL to create database-driven websites.  (By some estimates, at least 20 million websites worldwide now use PHP.)

Yank points out that “PHP is a server-side scripting language that lets you insert instructions into your web pages that your web server software (in most cases, Apache) will execute before it sends those pages to browsers that request them.”

Meanwhile, “[a] database server (in our case MySQL) is a program that can store large amounts of information in an organized format that’s easily accessible through programming languages like PHP. For example, you could tell PHP to look in the database for a list of jokes that you’d like to appear on your website.”

Yank’s fifth edition shows you how to use PHP to create a working content management system (CMS) that accesses – no surprise here – an online joke database that’s managed with MySQL. (Of course, if you think a simple joke database is lame, you can always modify a few tables and labels and create something more substantial, such as a database of vegetables you hate or celebrities or politicians you consider utterly irrelevant to your life.) 

Building a joke database (or whatever) is a pleasant way to learn the basics of PHP coding and database design and then quickly start improving your knowledge and skills as the CMS project is expanded and given more capabilities.

Yank’s book has 12 chapters and four appendices. The how-to chapters are split into short paragraphs, with numerous short code examples. A link is provided where the book’s code examples can be downloaded in a ZIP archive. And the book’s text is written in a smooth, approachable style.

PHP & MySQL: Novice to Ninja, 5th Edition is “aimed at intermediate and advanced web designers looking to make the leap into server-side programming,” Yank says. He expects readers to be familiar with “simple HTML” but “[n]o knowledge of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) or JavaScript is assumed or required.”

He adds, however, “if you do know JavaScript, you’ll find it will make learning PHP a breeze, since these languages are quite similar.”

Si Dunn

MySQL Troubleshooting – Tools, steps & advice from an expert – #bookreview

MySQL Troubleshooting
By Sveta Smirnova
(O’Reilly,
paperback, list price $29.99; Kindle edition, list price $14.99)

Sveta Smirnova knows how to find and fix MySQL problems. She is a principal technical support engineer in Oracle’s Bug Analysis Support Group and works daily with MySQL support issues and bug fixes.

Her new book is structured to help both MySQL beginners and those with more advanced skills, and it has been reviewed, prior to publication, by several other MySQL experts.

This well-written how-to guide likely will become a must-have reference book for many MySQL database administrators and support staff, as well as those currently learning MySQL. It contains numerous code examples, log excerpts and other illustrations, plus tips gleaned from long experience at solving a wide array of MySQL issues.

MySQL Troubleshooting has seven chapters:

  • Chapter 1, Basics – Basic troubleshooting techniques
  • Chapter 2, You Are Not Alone: Concurrency Issues – Problems that can occur “when applications run in multiple threads or interfere with transactions in other applications.”
  • Chapter 3, Effects of Server Options – A two-part chapter: (1) How to find and fix problems caused by configuration options; and (2) recommendations on how to solve and test configuration issues.  
  • Chapter 4, MySQL’s Environment – Deals with hardware and server environments. Lists “some points a MySQL database administrator (DBA) must look into.”
  • Chapter 5, Troubleshooting Replication – When slaves lag far behind the master, and related issues.
  • Chapter 6, Troubleshooting Techniques and Tools – Describes “extra techniques and tools” not discussed in earlier chapters.
  • Chapter 7, Best Practices – Focuses on “good habits and behaviors for safe and effective troubleshooting.”

An appendix titled “Information Resources” offers a number of websites and books that the author deems “good sources of information that can help during troubleshooting.”

She notes that MySQL now has “many forks” and acknowledges that her book cannot cover everything, nor “describe servers I don’t work with daily.” For example, she skips over Percona server and MariaDB but says “most of the methods described here” can be used except when “dealing with a particular feature added in the fork,” which will require product-specific information.

She also does not cover MySQL Cluster problems. Issues “specific to MySQL Cluster need separate MySQL Cluster knowledge that I don’t describe here,” she writes.

“But I do devote a lot of space to MyISAM- and InnoDB-specific problems…because they are by far the most popular storage engines, and their installation base is huge.”

A few of her code examples use PHP. But the C API is used “to illustrate the functions discussed in this book. The choice wasn’t easy,” she notes, “because there are a lot of programming APIs for MySQL in various languages.” And covering them all is impossible, she adds.

For many who work with MySQL, MySQL Troubleshooting can help solve or prevent a wide range of  problems, from easily overlooked syntax glitches to complex issues involving configuration, replication or multiple threads. And even if she doesn’t specifically cover your “fork” of MySQL, many of her tips, techniques, and examples can be adapted and put to good use in your own support and troubleshooting efforts.

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir available now in paperback. He is the author of a detective novel, Erwin’s Law, a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.