Photoshop CC and Lightroom – An elegant, well-focused how-to handbook from Rocky Nook – #photography #bookreview

 

Photoshop CC and Lightroom

A Photographer’s Handbook

Stephen Laskevitch

(Rocky Nook - paperback, Kindle)

 

Stephen Laskevitch’s Photoshop CC and Lightroom is an excellent how-to book that both instructs and inspires.

This elegant new how-to book from Rocky Nook is aimed at digital photographers and graphics designers “who want to learn the basic tools and image editing steps within Photoshop and Lightroom to recreate professional looking images.” However, the book also is recommended for “a wide range of technicians and office workers who simply want to do more effective image editing.”

As a sometimes-photographer and not-frequent-enough user of feature-rich Photoshop, I definitely need how-to books like this to keep me on track with the features that I “know,” while also reminding me that there are many useful features I have not yet tried or learned. Fortunately, Laskevitch, an Adobe Certified Instructor, deliberately avoids the common tendency to showcase just the  “wow-factor Photoshop techniques.” Instead, he emphasizes “all the key techniques for good image editing: using layers and layer blending, color correction, printer profiles, and more.”

His book is richly illustrated with photographs that can inspire you to pick up your camera and go shoot. And it has plenty of how-to illustrations and steps for using the 2014 release of Photoshop CC, plus its companions: Bridge, Camera Raw, and Lightroom 5, as you process, enhance and preserve your images.

Bridge is a tool that lets you examine, sort, rate and organize the images in a folder. Adobe Camera Raw provides a few settings that can be selected or adjusted, and Laskevitch recommends shooting in RAW format, unless shooting snapshots. “One of the biggst advantages of RAW files,” he emphasizes, “is that they have more than 8 bits per channel of information and can therefore be edited more than JPEG files.” Lightroom, meanwhile, is “a photographer-friendly database application” that helps you keep track of your images and where you have stored them.

Photoshop CC and Lightroom is divided into two parts and ten chapters:

The Setup

  • Important Terms & Concepts
  • System Configuration
  • The Interface: A Hands-On Tour

The Workflow

  • Capture & Import
  • Organizing & Archiving Images
  • Global Adjustments
  • Local Adjustments
  • Cleaning & Retouching
  • Creative Edits & Alternatives
  • Output

“Output,” Laskevitch notes, “is the creation of what I call deliverables, whether that is a print, a book, a web site, or a digital file. Printing should be easier than it is, especially after all of these years of digital imaging. Improved with each release of Photoshop, the method I outline is simpler than ever. But since it uses profiles tht describe your printer’s characteristics to achineve stunning consistency and optimal results, you’ll have to keep focused nonetheless. This method,” he explains,” can also allaow you to experiment with many more papers than your printer manufacturer supplies.”

You do not have to have any prior Photoshop experience to benefit from Photoshop CC and Lightroom: A Photographer’s Handbook. And Photoshop works with either Windows or Mac computers, the author points out. Also, many (but not all) of the worfklows and techniques he describes can be used with previous versions of the software products, as well.

Si Dunn

  

Java 8 in Action – Ready for lambdas, streams and functional-style programming? #bookreview

 

Java 8 in Action

Lambdas, streams, and functional-style programming

Raoul-Gabriel Urma, Mario Fusco, Alan Mycroft

(Manning - paperback)

 Java 8, we were sometimes assured, would just be Java 7 with a few slick new (or past-due) features added.

Actually, now that it’s here, Java 8 represents “the biggest change to Java in the 18 years since Java 1.0 was released,” the three authors of this fine new book point out.

Of course, news of “big changes” seldom sits well with developers who have spent countless hours learning and getting comfortable with one particular version of a programming language.

And many coders and companies will continue sticking with Java 7 for a while longer, because it still works. But the adoption pace for Java 8 keeps picking up. So, to misquote an old sci-fi slogan, resistance soon will become somewhat futile.

Lambdas, streams, and functional-style programming capabilities are Java 8’s headline additions. And there are some other major and minor additions, as well, including default methods and a new Date and Time API.

Java 8 in Action does an excellent job of introducing these new capabilities, and the book offers many short code examples and other illustrations to show how to put the new Java 8 capabilities to work.

Indeed, short (and shorter!) code is one of the hallmarks of Java 8. “In Java 8 you can write more concise code that reads a lot closer to the problem statement,” the writers emphasize. To illustrate that point, they offer a five-line example of verbose Java 7 code and follow it with a one-line Java 8 code example that accomplishes the same thing. Other examples also drive home the coding efficiencies that Java 8 can offer.

Lambdas, also known as anonymous functions, enable you to skip writing method definitions that will only be used once. The authors note that “passing code is currently tedious and verbose in Java [meaning 7 and earlier]. Well, good news! Lambdas fix this problem: they let you pass code in a concise way. Lambdas technically don’t let you do anything you couldn’t do prior to Java 8. But you no longer have to write clumsy code using anonymous classes to benefit from behavior parameterization!”

The new Streams API makes it much easier to work with collections in Java and provides “a much different way to process data in comparison to the Collections API.” Using the Streams API, “you don’t need to think in terms of loops at all. The data processing happens internally inside the library.”

Meanwhile, if you are a diehard object-oriented programmer, you may be leery of the term “functional programming” and the notion of using functions as values. (“In practice, you can’t completely program in pure functional style in Java,” the authors note. Instead, you will learn how to write “functional-style programs” in which you hide the side effects.)

With Java 8, “two core ideas from functional programming…are now part of Java: using methods and lambdas as first-class values, and the idea that calls to functions or methods can be efficiently and safely executed in parallel in the absence of mutable shared state. Both of these ideas are exploited by the new Streams API,” the writers state.  Also, in Java 8, they add, “there’s an Optional class that, if used consistently can help you avoid NullPointer exceptions.”

This review barely dents the surface of this excellent how-to book’s contents. Whether you are learning Java now or you are a Java developer who wants to keep your coding skills up-to-date and sharp, Java 8 in Action should be a book you will read soon.

Si Dunn

Cloudera Administration Handbook – How to become an effective Big Data administrator of large Hadoop clusters – #bookreview

 

 

Cloudera Administration Handbook

 Rohit Menon

Packt PublishingKindle, paperback

 

The explosive growth and use of Big Data in business, government, science and other arenas has fueled a strong demand for new Hadoop administrators. The administrators’ key duty is to set up and maintain Hadoop clusters that help process and analyze massive amounts of information.

New Hadoop administrators and those looking to join their ranks especially will want to give good consideration to The Cloudera Administration Handbook by Rohit Menon. This is a well-organized, well-written and solidly illustrated guide to building and maintaining large Apache Hadoop clusters using Cloudera Manager and CDH5.

The author has an extensive computer science background and is a Cloudera Certified Apache Hadoop Developer. He notes that “Cloudera Inc., is a Palo Alto-based American enterprise software company that provides Apache Hadoop-based software, support and services, and training to data-driven enterprises. It is often referred to as the commercial Hadoop company.”

CDH, Menon points out, is the easy shorthand name for a rather awkward software title: “Cloudera’s Distribution Including Apache Hadoop.” CDH is “an enterprise-level distribution including Apache Hadoop and several components of its ecosystem such as Apache Hive, Apache Avro, HBase, and many more. CDH is 100 percent open source,” Menon writes.

The Cloudera Manager, meanwhile, “is a web-browser-based administration tool to manage Apache Hadoop clusters. It is the centralized command center to operate the entire cluster from a single interface. Using Cloudera Manager, the administrator gets visibility for each and every component in the cluster.”

The Cloudera Manager is not explored until nearly halfway into the book, and some may wish it had been explained sooner, since they may be trying to learn it on day one of their new job. However, Menon wants readers first to become familiar with “all the steps and operations needed to set up a cluster via the command line” at a terminal. And these are, of course, important considerations to becoming an effective, knowledgeable and versatile Hadoop Administrator.  (You may not always have access to Cloudera Manager while setting up or troubleshooting a cluster.)

The book’s nine chapters show its well-focused range:

  • Chapter 1: Getting Started with Apache Hadoop
  • Chapter 2: HDFS and MapReduce
  • Chapter 3: Cloudera’s Distribution Including Apache Hadoop
  • Chapter 4: Exploring HDFS Federation and Its High Availability
  • Chapter 5: Using Cloudera Manager
  • Chapter 6: Implementing Security Using Kerberos
  • Chapter 7: Managing an Apache Hadoop Cluster
  • Chapter 8: Cluster Monitoring Using Events and Alerts
  • Chapter 9: Configuring Backups

You will have to bring some hardware and software experience and skills to the table, of course. Apache Hadoop primarily is run on Linux. “So having good Linux skills such as monitoring, troubleshooting, configuration, and security is a must” for a Hadoop administrator, Menon points out. Another requirement is being able to work comfortably with the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) and understand Java exceptions.

But those skills and his Cloudera Administration Handbook can take you from “the very basics of Hadoop” to taking up “the responsibilities of a Hadoop administrator and…managing huge Hadoop clusters.”

Si Dunn

Help support the work of reviewing books. Click here to buy the book:  Kindle, paperback

The Sony a7 and a7R: The Unofficial Quintessential Guide – #photography #bookreview

sony_a7_a7r

The Sony a7 and a7R

The Unofficial Quintessential Guide

Brian Matsumoto and Carol F. Roulland

(Rocky Nook - paperback, Kindle)

 

Rocky Nook has gained a hard-earned reputation for publishing excellent digital camera how-to guides. And this new one does not disappoint.

The Sony a7 and a7R: The Unofficial Quintessential Guide is aimed at both professional photographers and newcomers who recently have acquired, or are still considering, various elements of the Sony a7 and a7R digital photography and video system, including camera bodies, lenses and accessories.

The authors, who both have extensive photography experience, praise the a7 and a7R as “a breakthrough camera design…the lightest, least expensive, full-frame interchangeable lens cameras available to professional and amateur photographers” at the time their book was written.

The a7/a7R system has some innovations, including, for example, “a completely electronic viewfinder” that provides “immediate feedback on errors in white balance, focus, and exposure.” You also can use the viewfinder to “preview the image with additional artistic elements, such as saturated vivid colors, or muted colors and subtle shades, to decide how to create the proper ambience for the scene.” You also can preview the image in black-and-white.

But Matsumoto and Roulland offer a caution, as well. The a7 and a7R cameras are not well-suited for “taking action shots with a rapid-fire burst capability.” They recommend some of the “heavier digital SLRs,” instead.  The a7 and a7R, they contend, are “eminently suitable for those photographers who are interested in taking pictures at a more deliberate rate, who are concerned about critical composition, and whose aim is to take landscapes close-ups, portraits, or scientific photographs.”

Their 11-chapter, 362-page book wisely includes a chapter titled the “Basics of Digital Photography” near the front of the book, so users new to the a7 and a7R series–particularly those moving up from simple point-and-shoot cameras can learn to how to set their cameras on Intelligent Auto mode or Superior Auto mode and take good pictures while they are becoming familiar with menus, options and features.  (Superior Auto mode “is able to fine-tune the camera settings to create a better-quality image,” the two authors point out.)

Like many other of today’s digital cameras, the a7 and a7R offer “scores of menu commands and options, which can discourage even the most experienced user” if time and care are not taken to learn the ones you will use most often.

Matsumoto’s and Roulland’s excellent how-to book begins with chapters on “Getting Started” and learning the basics of photography, including f/stops, ISO numbers and some essential settings when shooting pictures or video.

The remaining chapters cover:

  • Managing Your Images
  • Automatic Settings
  • Taking Control of the Camera
  • Manual Control
  • Additional Features
  • Working with the Camera’s Wireless Functions
  • Accessory Lenses
  • Flash Photography
  • Making Movies

Two appendices also are included. Appendix A covers menu commands. Appendix B focuses on error messages and warning messages and how to resolve them.

A caution is offered for those who may use the a7R with telescopes, long telescopic lenses, or microscopes. “In comparison to the a7, movement of the a7R’s mechanical shutter can generate significant vibration which can blur the image.”  However, Matsumoto and Roulland also offer some tips to minimize the vibration’s effects.

If you have or are considering this new Sony camera system, The Sony a7 and a7R: The Unofficial Quintessential Guide packs a lot more clear and useful information than you will find in the official user manuals.

The book is richly illustrated, and it provides clear, step-by-step procedures and recommendations for every feature. You’ll need and want it in your library and in your camera case.

Si Dunn

 

Mule in Action, 2nd Edition – Want to be an integration developer? Here’s a good start – #bookreview

 

Mule in Action, Second Edition

David Dossot, John D’Emic, Victor Romero

(Manning – paperback)

 

An enterprise service bus (ESB) can help you link together many different types of platforms and applications–old and new–and keep them communicating and passing data between each other.

“Mule,” this book’s authors note, “is a lightweight, event-driven enterprise service bus and an integration platform and broker.  As such, it resembles more a rich and diverse toolbox than a shrink-wrapped application.”

Mule in Action, Second Edition, is a comprehensive and generally well-written overview of Mule 3 and how to put its open-source building blocks together to create integration solutions and develop them with Mule. The book provides very good focus on sending, receiving, routing, and transforming data, key aspects of an ESB.

More attention, however, could have been paid to clarity and detail in Chapter 1, the all-important chapter that helps Mule newcomers get started and enthused.

This second edition is a recent update of the 2009 first edition. Unfortunately, the Mule screens have changed a bit since the book’s screen shots were created for the new edition. Therefore, some of the how-to instructions and screen images do not match what the user now sees. This gets particularly confusing while trying to learn how to configure a JMS outbound endpoint for the first time, using Mule Studio’s graphical editor. The instructions seem insufficient, and the mismatch of screens can leave a beginner unsure how to proceed.

The same goes for configuring the message setting in the Logger element. The text instructs: “You’ll set the message attribute to print a String followed by the payload of the message, using the Mule Expression Language.” But no example is given. Fortunately, a reviewer on Amazon has posted a correct procedure. In his view, the message attribute should be: We received a message: #[message.payload]  –without any quote marks around it. (It works.)

Of course, this book is not really aimed at beginners–it’s for developers, architects, and managers (even though there will be Mule “beginners” in those ranks). Fortunately, it soon moves away from relying solely on Mule Studio’s graphical editor. The book’s examples, as the authors note, “mostly focus on the XML configurations of flows.” Thus, there are many XML code examples to work with, plus occasional screen shots of the flows as they appear in Mule Studio. And you can use other IDEs to work with the XML, if you prefer.

Indeed, the authors note, “no functionality in the CE version of Mule is dependent on Mule Studio.”

Overall, this is a very good book, and it definitely covers a lot of ground, from “discovering” Mule to becoming a Mule developer of integration applications, and using certain tools (such as business process management systems) to augment the applications you develop. I just wish a little more how-to clarity had been delivered in Chapter 1.

Si Dunn

Software Testing Foundations, 4th Edition – Updated study guide for Certified Tester Exam – #bookreview

Software Testing Foundations, 4th Edition

A Study Guide for the Certified Tester Exam

Andreas Spillner, Tilo Linz, Hans Schaefer

(Rocky Nook – paperback, Kindle

 

Worldwide, more than 300,000 software testers now have certifications recognized by the International Software Testing Qualifications Board (ISTQB).

“The ISTQB Certified Tester qualification scheme has three steps,” the authors note. “The basics are described in the Foundation Level curriculum (syllabus). Building on this is the Advanced Level certificate, showing a deeper knowledge of testing and evaluation. The third level, the Expert Level, is intended for experienced professional software testers and consists of several modules about different special topics.”

This newly updated study guide covers subjects on the Certified Tester Exam at the Foundation Level. The major topics are:

  • Fundamentals of Testing
  • Testing in the Software Life Cycle
  • Static Test
  • Dynamic Analysis – Test Design Techniques
  • Test Management

Appendices cover standardized test plans, offer exercises for each chapter that follow the introduction, and provide a glossary of terms, many of which are recognized by the ISTQB.

“Testing has no tradition for using standardized terminology,” the writers caution. “Thus, the test plan should contain an explanation of the testing terms used in the project. There is a high danger that different people will have different interpretations of testing terms. For example, just ask several people involved in the project for the definition of the term load testing.”

The three writers point out that “[t]he Certified Tester Foundation Level syllabus version 2011 forms the basis of this book . A few updates to the syllabus, which is due to be released in 2015, are noted in the book. The respective national boards may create and maintain additional national versions of the syllabus. These may contain minor deviations from the English original, such as, for example, references to local standards. The national boards coordinate and guarantee mutual compatibility of their curricula and exams. In this context, the responsible board is the International Software Testing Qualifications Board.”

Whether you plan to seek formal ISTQB certifications or just up your game as a software tester, Software Testing Foundations can be an excellent how-to guide. Many aspects of software testing–a complex and often underappreciated field–are covered. Overall, the book is well-organized and written clearly, and its illustrations, while somewhat sparse, are adequate to the task.

Si Dunn

 

Optimizing Hadoop for MapReduce – A practical guide to lowering some costs of mining Big Data – #bookreview

Optimizing Hadoop for MapReduce

Learn how to configure your Hadoop cluster to run optimal MapReduce jobs

Khaled Tannir

(Packt Publishing, paperback, Kindle)

Time is money, as the old saying goes. And that saying especially applies to the world of Big Data, where much time, computing power and cash can be consumed while trying to extract profitable information from mountains of data.

This short, well-focused book by veteran software developer Khalid Tannir describes how to achieve a very important, money-saving goal: improve the efficiency of MapReduce jobs that are run with Hadoop.

As Tannir explains in his preface:

“MapReduce is an important parallel processing model for large-scale, data-intensive applications such as data mining and web indexing. Hadoop, an open source implementation of MapReduce, is widely applied to support cluster computing jobs that require low response time.

“Most of the MapReduce programs are written for data analysis and they usually take a long time to finish. Many companies are embracing Hadoop for advanced data analytics over large datasets that require time completion guarantees.

“Efficiency, especially the I/O costs of MapReduce, still needs to be addressed for successful implications. The experience shows that a misconfigured Hadoop cluster can noticeably reduce and significantly downgrade the performance of MapReduce jobs.”

Tannir’s well-focused, seven-chapter book zeroes in on how to find and fix misconfigured Hadoop clusters and numerous other problems. But first, he explains how Hadoop parameters are configured and how MapReduce metrics are monitored.

Two chapters are devoted to learning how to identify system bottlenecks , including CPU bottlenecks, storage bottlenecks, and network bandwidth bottlenecks.

One chapter examines how to properly identify resource weaknesses, particularly in Hadoop clusters. Then, as the book shifts strongly to solutions, Tannir explains how to reconfigure Hadoop clusters for greater efficiency.

Indeed, the final three chapters deliver details and steps that can help you improve how well Hadoop and MapReduce work together in your setting.

For example, the author explains how to make the map and reduce functions operate more efficiently, how to work with small or unsplittable files, how to deal with spilled records (those written to local disk when the allocated memory buffer is full), and ways to tune map and reduce parameters to improve performance.

“Most MapReduce programs are written for data analysis and they usually take a lot of time to finish,” Tannir emphasizes. However: “Many companies are embracing Hadoop for advanced data analytics over large datasets that require completion-time guarantees.” And that means “[e]fficiency, especially the I/O costs of MapReduce, still need(s) to be addressed for successful implications.”

He describes how to use compression, Combiners, the correct Writable types, and quick reuse of types to help improve memory management and the speed of job execution.

And, along with other tips, Tannir presents several “best practices” to help manage Hadoop clusters and make them do their work quicker and with fewer demands on hardware and software resources. 

Tannir notes that “setting up a Hadoop cluster is basically the challenge of combining the requirements of high availability, load balancing, and the individual requirements of the services you aim to get from your cluster servers.”

If you work with Hadoop and MapReduce or are now learning how to help install, maintain or administer Hadoop clusters, you can find helpful information and many useful tips in Khaled Tannir’s Optimizing Hadoop for Map Reduce.

Si Dunn