OS X Mountain Lion: The Missing Manual – Another how-to classic from David Pogue – #bookreview

OS X Mountain Lion: The Missing Manual
David Pogue
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

 David Pogue knows how to produce excellent user manuals. He invented the popular “Missing Manual” series. And he continues to set high standards for other writers who also produce “Missing Manuals” and other tech books.  

Pogue’s newest, OS X Mountain Lion: The Missing Manual, is 864 pages of useful information, well presented, with clear writing and frequent sparks of humor.

It covers OS X 10.8 (which is pronounced “Oh-ess-ten, ten-dot-eight” [or “ten-point-eight”] by the way) and also covers iCloud.  Pogue cautions: “Don’t say ‘oh-ess-ex.’ You’ll get funny looks in public.”

Apple says OS X Mountain Lion has added 200 new features. But some users of previous Mac OS versions may be startled at a few capabilities that have been cut or reduced. (With this release, the term “Mac OS X” also has been reduced to “OS X” to better mesh with “iOS,” Apple contends.) Meanwhile, Pogue continues his well-known penchant for exposing and illustrating undocumented capabilities, irritants, and gotchas in software.

Still, he declares, “OS X is an impressive technical achievement; many experts call it the best personal-computer operating system on earth.”

Best OS or not, if you use OS X 10.8 and iCloud, you likely will want to have this how-to guide close at hand.

“If you could choose only one word to describe Apple’s overarching design goal in Lion and Mountain Lion, there’s no doubt about what it would be: iPad,” Pogue states.  “In this software, Apple has gone about as far as it could go in trying to turn the Mac into an iPad.”

OS X Mountain Lion: The Missing Manual is split into six parts, with 22 chapters and four appendices.

Part One: The OS X Desktop

  • Chapter 0: The Mountain Lion Landscape
  • Chapter 1: Folders & Windows
  • Chapter 2: Organizing Your Stuff
  • Chapter 3: Spotlight
  • Chapter 4: Dock, Desktop & Toolbars

Part Two: Programs in OS X

  • Chapter 5: Documents, Programs & Spaces
  • Chapter 6: Data: Typing, Dictating, Sharing & Backing Up
  • Chapter 7: Automator, AppleScript & Services
  • Chapter 8: Windows on Macintosh

Part Three: The Components of OS X

  • Chapter 9: System Preferences
  • Chapter 10: Reminders, Notes & Notification Center
  • Chapter 11: The Other Free Programs
  • Chapter 12: CDs, DVDs, iTunes & AirPlay

Part Four: The Technologies of OS X

  • Chapter 13: Accounts, Security & Gatekeeper
  • Chapter 14: Networking, File Sharing & AirDrop
  • Chapter 15: Graphics, Fonts & Printing
  • Chapter 16: Sound, Movies & Speech

Part Five: OS X Online

  • Chapter 17: Internet Setup & iCoud
  • Chapter 18: Mail & Contacts
  • Chapter 19: Safari
  • Chapter 20: Messages
  • Chapter 21: SSH, FTP, VPN & Web Sharing

Part Six: Appendixes

  • Appendix A: Installing OS X Mountain Lion
  • Appendix B: Troubleshooting
  • Appendix C: The Windows-to-Mac Dictionary
  • Appendix D: The Master OS X Secret Keystroke List

The focus stays firmly on “What’s this new feature for?” in OS X Mountain Lion: The Missing Manual. And David Pogue’s latest how-to classic makes it fun to test out a new feature with a good sense of what is supposed to happen and which choices are available or problematic .

Beats the heck out of opening up the software, randomly tinkering with selections, options and default settings, and then trying to figure out what you just did wrong.

Si Dunn

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