Intermediate Perl, 2nd Edition – An excellent guide to pushing well beyond the basics – #programming #bookreview

Intermediate Perl, 2nd Edition
Randal L. Schwartz, brian d foy & Tom Phoenix
(O’Reilly, paperback)

Attention, Perl programmers. Particularly those of you who write Perl programs with 100 lines of code or fewer but want to expand your limits. This popular intermediate guide, first published in 2006, has just been updated.

Intermediate Perl, 2nd Edition covers Perl 5.14. And: “It covers what you need to write programs that are 100 to 10,000 (or even longer) lines long,” the authors state.

This excellent book by three well-known Perl gurus does indeed cover a lot of ground. It shows you, for example, “how to work with multiple programmers on the same project by writing reusable Perl modules that you can wrap in distributions usable by the common Perl tools.”

It also shows you “how to deal with larger and more complex data structures….”

And it gets into some “object-oriented programming, which allows parts of your code (or hopefully code from others) to be reused with minor or major variations within the same program.”

It delves into two other important aspects of team programming: “…having a release cycle and a process for unit and integration testing. You’ll learn the basics of packaging your code as a distribution and providing unit tests for that distribution, both for development and for verifying that your code works in your target environment.”

One very important addition in the new edition is a chapter on references. “References,” the authors emphasize, “are the basis for complex data structures, object-oriented programming, and fancy subroutine handling. They’re the magic that was added between Perl versions 4 and 5 to make it all possible…” to handle “complex data interrelationships.”

The authors write in a lighthearted style that helps the coding medicine go down. And there are plenty of code examples and illustrations, plus a link to a website with downloads. They also provide exercises at the ends of chapters, with suggested completion times in minutes.

“If you take longer,” they add, “that’s just fine, at least until we figure out how to make ebooks with timers.”

However, if you take longer than “longer” or if you just get stumped, the answers conveniently are provided at the back of Intermediate Perl, 2nd Edition.

Si Dunn

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