Switching to the Mac, Mountain Lion Edition – David Pogue scores again – #bookreview

Switching to the Mac: Mountain Lion Edition
David Pogue
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

David Pogue will have to pry Windows PCs out of my cold, dead fingers.

That being said, his new book makes a very compelling case for why you other Windows users should switch from PCs to Macs right away.

As I’ve previously noted, I use three battle-scarred Windows PCs during a typical work day. Yet sometimes (don’t ask why), I am forced – forced, I tell you – to use my wife’s Macintosh, too.

Frankly, I have hated Macs for a long, long time. No, actually, I have hated the smug, “Everything’s milk and honey on a Mac!” attitude that peppy-preppy Mac users (my wife excluded) seem to radiate each time they get around us gray-haired Windows types.

I happen to think the Blue Screen of Death is a lovely work of art, easily on par with Thomas Gainsborough’s The Blue Boy and Edvard Munch’s The Scream, thank you very much. And what is life without the daily excitement of battling evil spyware and sinister viruses from Eastern Europe?

Seriously, I continue to be a huge fan of New York Times tech columnist David Pogue and “The Missing Manual” book series he created. I use several of O’Reilly’s “Missing” manuals on a regular basis.

His new book has convinced me that, okay, maybe it finally might be time to replace one of my combat-scarred PCs with a shiny new Mac. Then I, too, can radiate some of that lustrous “Everything’s sunshine and bunnies!” glow instead of merely gnashing my teeth at the need to download a new patch or service pack.

“OS X has a spectacular reputation for stability and security,” Pogue assures readers. “At this writing, there hasn’t been a single widespread OS X virus—a spectacular feature that makes Windows look like a waste of time.” (David, David, David. “Waste of time”? Tsk, tsk.)

If you are contemplating making the switch or have already switched from Windows to Mac – one that’s running OS X (Mountain Lion) – you need this book. It is well written and nicely illustrated, and it has a strong focus on helping Windows users feel comfortably at home on a new Mac.

“Be glad you waited so long to get a Mac,” Pogue writes in a chapter titled “Special Software, Special Problems.”

“By now, all the big-name programs look and work almost exactly the same on the Mac as they do on the PC.”

You will encounter situations where a favorite Windows program is not available in a Mac equivalent. But there usually are Mac equivalents that offer similar functions. Or, you often can run Windows programs on an OS X Mac in Windows format, Pogue points out.

He also shows how to transfer documents and other files from Windows machines to Macs. Usually, the transfers go smoothly. “It turns out that communicating with a Windows PC is one of the Mac’s most polished talents,” Pogue notes. Sometimes, there are problems, of course, even in “infallible” Mac Land. But Pogue’s huge book (743 pages) gives clear procedures or suggestions for dealing with most of them. And: “Most big-name programs are sold in both Mac and Windows flavors, and the documents they create are freely interchangeable.”

Switching to the Mac: Mountain Lion Edition is organized into five parts:

  • Part 1, Welcome to the Macintosh – Covers the differences between what you see on a Macintosh screen and a Windows screen. Pogue notes that “OS X offers roughly the same features as Windows. That’s the good news. The bad news is that these features are called different things and parked in different spots.”
  • Part 2, Making the Move – Covers how to move software, data and peripherals such as printers and scanners from a Windows PC to a Mac. Includes steps for running Windows on Macs, using Apple Boot Camp. “The only downsides: Your laptop battery life isn’t as good, and you have to restart the Mac again to return to the familiar world of OS X.”
  • Part 3, Making Connections – Shows how to set up web, iCloud, and email connections on a Mac and use Apple’s Internet software suite.
  • Part 4, Putting Down Roots – Covers user accounts, parental controls, security, networking, file sharing, screen sharing, system preferences, and OS X’s “freebie” programs, such as Calendar, Photo Booth, and QuickTime Player.
  • Part 5…(Hello? Why is Part 5 missing from the table of contents and the pages of the printed version?)
  • Part 6, Appendixes – Two of the four appendixes cover installing OS X Mountain Lion and troubleshooting. The third appendix is “The Windows-to-Mac Dictionary,” especially useful for Windows people who have to use a Macintosh once in a while. “It’s an alphabetical listing of every common Windows function and where to find it in OS X,” Pogue says. And the fourth appendix offers a “master keyboard-shortcut list for the entire Mac OS X universe.”

Switching to the Mac, Mountain Lion Edition offers sound reasons (1) why you may prefer to stick with certain Windows for Mac programs on your new Mac and (2) why you may want to abandon certain Windows programs written for Macs and learn to use the Mac programs that are, in Pogue’s estimation, “better.”

You won’t be alone if you become (as I likely will) a user who moves back and forth between Mac world and Windows world, for a long time if not “forever.” In that case, you’ll definitely want Switching to the Mac: Mountain Lion Edition on your reference shelf.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s