Python for Kids – A fun & efficient how-to book that even grownups can enjoy – #programming #bookreview

Python for Kids
Jason R. Briggs
(No Starch Press – paperback, Kindle)

Subtitled “A Playful Introduction to Programming,” Python for Kids is recommended “for kids aged 10+ (and their parents).”

But what if your kids are grown or you don’t have any kids? Should you ignore this book while learning Python? Absolutely not.

I’ve recently taken two Python 3 classes, and I wish I had had many of the explanations and illustrations in Python for Kids available to help me grasp some of the concepts. I’m keeping this book handy on my shelf for quick reference, right next to works such as Head First Python and Think Python.

Yeah, it contains plenty of silliness for kids, such as a wizard’s shopping list that includes “bear burp” and “slug butter,” and using if and elif statements to create jokes such as “What did the green grape say to the blue grape? Breathe! Breathe!” (I have grandchildren who consider this stuff uproariously funny.)

But Python for Kids also covers a lot of serious topics in its 316 pages and shows—simply and clearly—how to handle many major and minor aspects of the Python programming language. NOTE: This book is for the newer 3.X versions of Python, not older 2.X versions that are still in use and still a focus of some books for beginners.

One Python class I took didn’t introduce tuples until the 7th week of lectures. Python for Kids, however, has the reader using tuples on page 38, right after six pages of learning how to work with strings and lists. And the explanations and examples for these elements are clearer than what I got in a college-level course. (Of course, it helps when exercises involve “bear burp” and “gorilla belly-button lint” rather than boring generics such as “Mary has 3 oranges” and “Jack has 6 pencils.”)

Jason R. Brigg’s new book also shows how to draw shapes and patterns and create simple games and animations—topics not covered in some other beginning Python books I have used.

Another cool feature of this excellent how-to book is an afterword titled “Where to Go from Here.” It provides suggestions and gives links for those who want to learn more about games and graphics programming or take up other programming languages such as Ruby, PHP or JavaScript.

Bottom line, Python for Kids offers education and entertainment for children, their parents, and almost anyone else serious about having some fun while learning Python 3.

Si Dunn

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