The Healthy Programmer – Better coding through better living – #programming #bookreview

The Healthy Programmer

Get Fit, Feel Better, and Keep Coding

Joe Kutner

(Pragmatic Bookshelf – paperback)

Yes, you know it is unhealthy to spend all day and much of the night hunched at keyboard, staring at a computer screen, gripping a mouse and nervously clawing at bags of vending-machine snacks because you haven’t had time to eat proper meals.

Yet that is exactly how many of us earn a living: spending long hours writing code, fixing code, or writing about the processes of writing and fixing code.

The work of a programmer can be devilishly complex and tiring. Often, it can be highly stressful, too. And, it can, over the long run, damage your health or even help shorten your life, if you aren’t careful.

Joe Kutner’s The Healthy Programmer takes a pragmatic and low-key approach to showing you how you can start improving the conditions of your body and brain without disrupting your job. His tips, tricks, and “best practices” are backed up by advice and commentary from doctors, therapists, nutritionists, scientists, and fitness experts.

“Having a system or a process is crucial to getting things done,” Kutner says. “In software, we often use an agile method to guide our development efforts. Agile processes are characterized by an iterative and incremental approach to development, which allows us to adapt to changing requirements. The method you use to stay healthy shouldn’t be any different.”

In his book, he shows “how to define a system of time-boxed iterations that will improve your health. We’ll start with two-week intervals, but like with any agile method, you’ll be allowed to change that as needed. At the end of each iteration you’ll do a retrospective to assess your progress.”

Crucially, Kutner’s approach is to start small, by changing one habit, and start gently, by doing some walking. “You won’t be bombarded with exercises and activities right away,” he emphasizes. “Instead, we’ll spend the first few chapters introducing some very simple, but essential, components of a healthy lifestyle. Don’t think that they are too simple, though. These are the activities that will have the biggest effect on your life.”

Kutner’s well-researched, well-written book takes a whole-body approach, with a keen understanding how programmers work.  He has been one for more than a decade and has spent much of that time researching the physical hazards of sedentary coding.

Chair exercises, standing desks, wrist braces, eye-care tips, and dietary recommendations are some of the areas covered. A “Pomodoro break,” for example, can help people involved in many different types of creative work, including programming. The basic approach involves working on a single task for a specific amount of time, such as 60 minutes, with short periods of exercise interspersed.

You might set a timer for 25 minutes, then focus on debugging some code. When the timer goes off, you reset it for five minutes and take a short walk. Then spend another 25 minutes doing a code review. When the timer goes off again, get up from your desk and do some exercises for five minutes. Then start a new task (or continue a previous problem) and repeat the cycle.

You may already have a daily exercise routine.  But Kutner warns that it “can interfere with your job [as a coder] if you don’t coordinate the two activities. If you do coordinate them, you may actually improve your ability to write code. That’s because immediately after exercise, blood shifts rapidly back to the brain, which makes it the perfect time to focus on tasks that require complex analysis and creativity.”

The Healthy Programmer has many good tips for avoiding or minimizing back pain, wrist pain, headaches and other irritants, as well good techniques for “upgrading your hardware,” meaning your body. Numerous easy-to-perform exercises are described and illustrated, including some you can do while seated or standing at your workstation. “[Y]our lifestyle can enhance your ability to do your job well,” Kutner emphasizes. “That’s why staying healthy is the best way to ensure you keep doing this job you love for years to come.”

Si Dunn

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