2014 Poet’s Market – Yes, you can get published and maybe even make (very little) money – #poetry #bookreview

2014 Poet’s Market

Edited by Robert Lee Brewer
(Writer’s Digest Books – paperback, Kindle)

C’mon, admit it. You hated poetry in high school, and you seldom read it now. Yet, you sometimes find yourself moved to write a poem–or at least attempt to. And you wonder if the ones you actually finish are good enough to get published.

The 27th annual edition of Poet’s Market shows how and where you can submit poems for possible publication (and, much rarer, possible payment for your work). The sites listed include The New Yorker (“which receives approximately 4,000 submissions per month”) and The New England Review (which receives 3,000 to 4,000 poetry submissions per year and accepts about 70 to 80).

Hundreds of other printed and online publications are covered, along with their submission procedures and the types of poetry they are seeking. For example, at the online publication Necrology Shorts: Tales of Macabre and Horror: “We expect deranged, warped, twisted, strange, sadistic, and things that question sanity and reality.”

The 505-page 2014 Writer’s Market contains interviews with poets, a quick and helpful overview of poetic forms, plus 15 fine, well-displayed poems to keep you inspired and/or jealous. And the book contains solid information on how to promote yourself as a poet and give effective poetry readings.

If you are serious about writing poetry–and even if you choose to self-publish your works–you will find a rich array of how-to’s, hints, cautionary tales, marketing tips and other worthwhile resources in the 2014 Poet’s Market.

Si Dunn

Rapid Android Development – Using Processing to build apps fast – #programming #bookreview

Rapid Android Development

Build Rich, Sensor-Based Applications with Processing
Daniel Sauter
(Pragmatic Bookshelfpaperback)

The main goal of Daniel Sauter’s nicely written new book is to help you learn “how to develop interactive, sensor-based Android apps” quickly.

At first glance, you may question how “quickly” you can go through 13 chapters with a total of 363 pages, including the index.

But there’s good news here, particularly if you are not a patient programmer. The book is divided into five parts, all structured to serve as “self-contained mini-courses.” And the author has geared his text toward six semi-specific categories of readers.

Sauter, by the way, is an artist and educator with some eight years’ experience teaching Processing. Processing is a free “award-winning, graphics-savvy” programming language and development environment that can be used to work with Android devices and software.

Let’s go to the six reader categories first. Rapid Android Development is aimed at:

  1. Readers with at least “a basic understanding of programming concepts….”
  2. Intermediate Processing users “looking to create Android apps from within the Processing IDE….”
  3. “Educators who teach courses on mobile technologies” and need “a free tool that does not require developer licenses or subscriptions.”
  4. Java and Android developers who want to use Processing to leverage “a host of libraries for productivity gains.” (Java developers will quickly see that Processing builds on Java.)
  5. JavaScript and Web developers who want to use Processing.js syntax to help them create “JavaScript-powered web applications that can run inside browsers without plugins or other modifications. Processing.js also takes advantage of WebGL hardware acceleration.”
  6. Arduino users and hobbyists, particularly those “interested in adapting Android phones or tablets for use as sensing devices, controllers, or graphics processors.”

Now let’s look at the five parts of Rapid Android Development.

  • Part I focuses on installing Processing and the Android SDK but also looks at touch screens and Android sensors and cameras.
  • Part II is devoted to “working with the camera and location devices found on most Androids.”
  • Part III’s emphasis is on peer-to-peer networking, including Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Direct, plus Near Field Communication (NFC), which is “expected to revolutionize the point-of-sale industry,” Sauter notes.
  • Part IV “deals with data and storage,” he adds, “as all advanced apps require some sort of data storage and retrieval to keep user data up-to-date.”
  • Part V examines 3D graphics and cross-platform apps.

You will need several software tools and at least one Android device to work with the code examples in this book. (The book lists several Android phones and tablets that have been tested with the code examples, which are available online.)

If you want to do some work in Part III, you will need at least two Android devices (so your peer can have a peer). And if you have absolutely no programming experience, you should get some first. Sauter, an associate professor of New Media art at the University of Illinois–Chicago School of Art and Design, offers some suggestions for good sources.

His new book seems a bit light on illustrations. But its well-displayed, well-explained code examples and clear how-to paragraphs keep the reader moving and making progress.

If you are a creative coder looking for some new skills, projects and challenges, check out Rapid Android Development, ASAP.

Si Dunn 

Instant Handlebars.js – A short but effective how-to guide – #programming #bookreview

Instant Handlebars.js

Learn how to create and implement HTML templates into your projects using the Handlebars library
Gabriel Manricks
(Packt Publishing – e-book, paperback)

“Short, fast, and focused.” These are the three promises offered for Gabriel Manricks’ new book, Instant Handlebars.js, from Packt Publishing. And, at just 62 pages in print format, it lives up to those vows.

Manricks explains and demonstrates Handlebars using five well-structured sections. First, he introduces Handlebars.js and describes what a templating engine is and does. He notes that “[t]he purpose of using a templating engine such as Handlebars is to generate some kind of viewable content (usually HTML pages), dynamically.” He then shows how to download the Handlebars library and create a “Hello {{name}}” template and a simple helper.

His “Top 6 Features you need to know about” section goes to the heart of Handlebars.js and shows how you can organize large projects and pre-compile templates.

The Top 6 topics include: (1) Expressions—“the core of templates”; (2) Helpers—“[t]hese are where Handlebars gets its extendibility”; (3) Partials—“the building blocks of the template world” and important for modular design; (4) Structuring a Handlebars app—the pros and cons of various potential structures; (5) Pre-compilation—which can lead to “a more optimized and efficient site”; and (6) Logging and comments—“writing clear and debug-able templates and helpers, so you can easily test and maintain them in the future.”

In the book’s final section, “People and places you should get to know,” Manricks describes some individuals and websites you should follow so you can “stay up to date and dive deeper into the Handlebars community.”

Despite its small page count, the book contains numerous short code examples that show how to put Handlebars.js to work in HTML files.

You need at least some modest experience with JavaScript and HTML to get full benefit from this book. You also will make brief use of Node.js to install Handlebars.js.

If you have done any work with Ember.js, you already have picked up some Handlebars.js experience. However, even here, this short, handy guide can help you get a better understanding of how to use Handlebars, with or without Ember.

Instant Handlebars.js can be ordered in e-book or paperback format direct from Packt Publishing’s website. Or, the Kindle version and the paperback can be ordered via Amazon.

Si Dunn

Making Sense of NoSQL – A balanced, well-written overview – #bigdata #bookreview

Making Sense of NoSQL

A Guide for Managers and the Rest of Us
Dan McCreary and Ann Kelly
(Manning, paperback)

This is NOT a how-to guide for learning to use NoSQL software and build NoSQL databases. It is a meaty, well-structured overview aimed primarily at “technical managers, [software] architects, and developers.” However, it also is written to appeal to other, not-so-technical readers who are curious about NoSQL databases and where NoSQL could fit into the Big Data picture for their business, institution, or organization.

Making Sense of NoSQL definitely lives up to its subtitle: “A guide for managers and the rest of us.”

Many executives, managers, consultants and others today are dealing with expensive questions related to Big Data, primarily how it affects their current databases, database management systems, and the employees and contractors who maintain them. A variety of  problems can fall upon those who operate and update big relational (SQL) databases and their huge arrays of servers pieced together over years or decades.

The authors, Dan McCreary and Ann Kelly, are strong proponents, obviously, of the NoSQL approach. It offers, they note, “many ways to allow you to grow your database without ever having to shut down your servers.” However, they also realize that NoSQL may not a good, nor affordable, choice in many situations. Indeed, a blending of SQL and NoSQL systems may be a better choice. Or, making changes from SQL to NoSQL may not be financially feasible at all. So they have structured their book into four parts that attempt to help readers “objectively evaluate SQL and NoSQL database systems to see which business problems they solve.”

Part 1 provides an overview of NoSQL, its history, and its potential business benefits. Part 2 focuses on “database patterns,” including “legacy database patterns (which most solution architects are familiar with), NoSQL patterns, and native XML databases.” Part 3 examines “how NoSQL solutions solve the real-world business problems of big data, search, high availability, and agility.” And Part 4 looks at “two advanced topics associated with NoSQL: functional programming and system security.”

McCreary and Kelly observe that “[t]he transition to functional programming requires a paradigm shift away from software designed to control state and toward software that has a focus on independent data transformation.” (Erlang, Scala, and F# are some of the functional languages that they highlight.) And, they contend: “It’s no longer sufficient to design a system that will scale to 2, 4, or 8 core processors. You need to ask if your architecture will scale to 100, 1,000, or even 10,000 processors.”

Meanwhile, various security challenges can arise as a NoSQL database “becomes popular and is used by multiple projects” across “department trust boundaries.”

Computer science students, software developers, and others who are trying to stay knowledgeable about Big Data technology and issues should also consider reading this well-written book.

Si Dunn