THE RESPONSIVE WEB: A ‘mobile-first’ guide to creating websites effective for all devices – #bookreview

The Responsive Web

Matthew Carver

(Manning – paperback)

While devices for viewing websites keep getting smaller–web-enabled watches are a recent example–the challenges get bigger and tougher for website designers and developers. How do you create websites that effectively adjust to the size of the devices where they are being viewed, while also delivering essential information and links to the viewers?

“Responsive web design,” Matthew Carver writes in his excellent new book, “is a technique of designing websites that scale for various browsers, including mobile, tablet, and desktop. It’s made possible through CSS3 Media queries and offers developers the opportunity to design a site once for multiple devices. While the technique is seemingly simple, the practice itself involves several challenges.”

Carver’s book, The Responsive Web, goes well beyond simply showing and explaining a few web page templates. With clear text and excellent illustrations, the author offers numerous practical techniques and tips, and he provides the reasoning behind their importance, without wandering too deeply into web-design and user-experience theory.

This superior how-to book reflects Carver’s real-world experience as “an early adopter of responsive web design.” As a front-end designer, web developer and consultant, his clients have included such notables as American Airlines, the Dallas Morning News, Chobani, Home Depot, and Google.

The Responsive Web is divided into three parts, with a total of nine chapters.

Starting at Part One: The Responsive Way, Carver definitely does not dawdle. In the very first chapter, we are offered “all the basic information you need to get started with responsive web design.” Chapter 2, meanwhile, covers a key concept in Carver’s approach: “designing for mobile first” when creating responsive websites.

Part Two: Designing for the Responsive Web has four chapters built around “what goes into responsive web design from the visual designer’s and user-experience (UX) designer’s perspectives,” Carver writes, “but don’t think this information won’t apply to developers. There’s important stuff in here for everyone, and as this book teaches, web design requires collaboration.”

In Part Three: Expanding the Design with Code, the three final chapters cover some of the grittier details of responsive web design, including creating an effective page with HTML5 and CSS3, working with graphics, and using “progressive enhancement.” Carver notes: “With progressive enhancement you can create websites so that they function well in a variety of platforms, each with their own limitations and specifications.” And finally, he does not skip “testing and optimization.” The book’s final chapter is devoted to “the nitty gritty of optimizing your website for performance on every screen.”

In an intriguing appendix, Carver also discusses the processes and possibilities of introducing certain degrees of context awareness to websites. “What if, instead of resizing the design to adapt to the user’s device, you could also format parts of the site based on factors like location, time of day, the user’s history on the site, or the user’s activity level,” he points out. “Theoretically, all of this data is accessible to the design of a page and could be used to greatly enhance the user’s experience.”

Bottom line,  this is a very timely and useful guide for those who work with websites, as well as for those who manage web designers and developers.

Si Dunn

 

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