jQUERY UI IN ACTION: A smooth guide to getting, learning and using plugins supported by the jQuery Foundation – #bookreview

jQuery UI in Action

TJ VanToll

 (Manning – paperback)

 

TJ VanToll had two straightforward goals in mind when he decided to write this nicely prepared book: “I wanted to write about how to use the jQuery UI components in real-world usage scenarios and applications. I also wanted to tackle the tough questions for jQuery UI users. [Such as] Why should you use the jQuery UI datepicker instead of the native date picker included in HTML5? How do you use jQuery UI on mobile devices, especially in low bandwidth situations?”

According to the jQuery Foundation, “jQuery is a fast, small, and feature-rich JavaScript library. It makes things like HTML document traversal and manipulation, event handling, animation, and Ajax much simpler with an easy-to-use API that works across a multitude of browsers. With a combination of versatility and extensibility, jQuery has changed the way that millions of people write JavaScript.”

The problem with popularity, of course, is that jQuery became widely employed soon after it was introduced in 2006. Users quickly created a flood of jQuery plugins that, Van Toll writes, “had inconsistent APIs, and often had little or no documentation. Because of these problems, the jQuery team wanted to provide an official set of plugins in a centralized location. In September 2007 they created a new library with these plugins—jQuery UI.”

He adds: “From a high level, jQuery UI was, and still is, a collection of plugins and utilities that build on jQuery. But dig deeper and you find a set of consistent, well-documented, themeable building blocks to help you create everything from small websites to highly complex web applications. Unlike jQuery plugins, the plugins and utilities in jQuery UI are supported by the jQuery Foundation. You can count on them to be officially supported and maintained throughout the life of your application.”

Well-written and well-illustrated, jQuery UI in Action reflects VanToll’s knowledge and experience as a professional web developer and member of the core jQuery UI team.

The book is structured into three parts, encompassing 12 chapters. And it assumes readers have at least basic experience with JavaScript, CSS, and jQuery.

Part One’s chapters introduce jQuery UI and “the ins and outs of widgets…the core building blocks of jQuery UI.”

Part Two’s chapters offer “a comprehensive look at the components of jQuery UI: twelve jQuery UI widgets (chapters 3–4), five jQuery
UI interactions (chapter 5), numerous jQuery UI effects (chapter 6), and the jQuery UI CSS framework (chapter 7).” VanToll explains how each component works and shows how to apply the knowledge to real-world applications. The example projects include: building complex webforms with jQueryUI; using layout and utility widgets; adding interaction to interfaces; and using built-in and customized themes to provide “a consistent look to all widgets.”

Part Three focuses on “Customization and advanced usage.” Here, VanToll explores such topics as using the widget factory to create custom widgets, preparing applications for production, and building a flight-search application “at real-world scale.” In the final chapter, he takes us under jQuery’s hood “to dig into a series of utilities, methods, and properties intended for more advanced usage of the library.”

If you work with jQuery or are ready to start using it, take a good look at jQuery UI, as well. As this book promises, “You’re only one tag away from richer user interfaces….” That tag is pretty simple: <script src=”jquery-ui.js”> — but a lot can happen once you include it.

TJ VanToll’s new book should be your go-to guide for getting, learning and putting jQuery UI into action.

Si Dunn

 

 

 

 

 

http://amzn.to/1r1VwUI

 

You’ll master jQuery UI’s five main interactions—draggable, droppable, resizable, selectable, and sortable—and learn UI techniques that work across all devices.

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