Groovy in Action, Second Edition – A hefty how-to guide newly updated for Groovy 2.4 – #programming #bookreview

Groovy in Action, Second Edition

Dierik König and Paul King, with Guillaume Laforge, Hamlet D’Arcy,
Cédric Champeau, Eric Pragt and Jon Skeet

Manning – paperback

Groovy in Action, Second Edition, is not light reading. Indeed, the printed book weighs nearly three and a half pounds and has 880 pages. But it is great reading for anyone who wants to learn, or get better at, the increasingly popular Groovy scripting language that works very smoothly with Java. Indeed, Java’s creator, James Gosling, has hailed Groovy’s “smooth and efficient” integration with Java and called Groovy “an effective implementation language in its own right.” He also has praised the Groovy in Action book as “a clear and detailed exposition of what is groovy about Groovy.”

The Second Edition‘s two main authors and five assisting authors are members of the Groovy core team. And their book spent a lot of time being reviewed and tested by readers in the Manning Early Access Program (MEAP) before it was formally released. So it likely has a better preparation record than many programming books currently on the market.

Groovy in Action‘s front flap indicates that the book covers Groovy 2.4. Groovy recently was up to version 2.4.3, but the programming language has maintained a good track record for supporting backward compatibility. Indeed, I tested random selections of the book’s code samples using version 2.2.0 and its Groovy Console, and programs compiled and ran without problem.

However, if you own the first edition of Groovy in Action, you likely will want to upgrade to the new book. It is, the authors state, “a full rewrite,” with several new chapters, plus  “a few hundred additional pages of genuinely new content.” (And yes, I am upgrading my Groovy installation from 2.2.0 to 2.4.3.)

Despite its heft, the book is nicely structured and easily approached. And its many code examples are mercifully compact, for the most part, and available online, if you prefer. (I actually enjoy keying reasonably short code examples into the Groovy Console.)

The 20 chapters are organized into three major parts:

  • The Groovy Language
  • Around the Groovy Library
  • Applied Groovy

“The Groovy Language” introduces the reader to the language’s basics: its “syntax, grammar, and typical idioms,” plus how to use dynamically typed Groovy as a static language, if desired. The “Around the Groovy Library” reference section focuses on such topics as working with builders and the Groovy Development Kit (GDK), as well as Groovy’s support for database programming and the handling of JSON and XML. And “Applied Groovy” looks at “typical uses cases for Groovy,” including “a thorough exposition of how to use Groovy for test automation,” how to put Groovy to work on multi-core machines in concurrent programming situations, and “using Groovy for domain specific languages.”

In short, there is no shortage of useful content in Groovy in Action, Second Edition.

Si Dunn

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Get Groovy in Action, Second Edition here, at no extra cost.
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