WRATH OF THE FURIES: Roman detective Gordianus the Finder tries to go undercover amid angry Greeks bearing arms – #bookreview

 

Wrath of the Furies

A Novel of the Ancient World

Steven Saylor

Minotaur Books – hardback, Kindle

As a young student, I deliberately avoided the ancient world—all of those armless and headless statues, magnificent carved-stone structures collapsed into rubble, “wonders of the world,” and gods and goddesses who allegedly had both magical powers and human frailties.

Now that I am somewhat older (okay, a lot older), I have read several of the 15 novels in Steven Saylor’s popular Roma Sub Rosa series of historical mysteries. The series features a clever Roman investigator known as Gordianus the Finder. Gordianus is a fictional character, but he encounters many of the ancient world’s real-life kings, queens, generals, political leaders and other figures while trying to solve murders and other crimes.

Thanks to Saylor’s expertise and irrepressible enthusiasm for ancient Roman and Greek times, I have found myself both enjoying his engaging fiction and pausing now and then to look up more about the people, places, things, and customs that Gordianus is encountering in each book. In other words, I am learning some eye-opening things about the ancient world and wishing I had gotten an earlier start.

In Saylor’s new novel, Wrath of the Furies, set in 88 B.C., Gordanius is a young man of just 22 and still somewhat subject to youth’s reckless belief in invincibility.  He receives a cryptic message, apparently a distress signal, from his former tutor and friend, Antipater, and decides to sneak into Greek-held territory to try to rescue him. Of course, this is at a dangerous moment. Greek forces led by the brutal King Mithridates are taking back Greek-speaking cities previously held by the Roman Empire. Some of Italy’s states also are revolting against Rome. So now is not a good time to be Roman detective snooping around amid angry Greeks bearing arms.

It is also not a good time for travelling with your slave (and lover), Bethesda, while trying to disguise yourself as a mute so your Roman-accented Greek won’t give you away. And it is an especially bad time to be going to the ancient Greek-speaking city of Ephesus (where King Mithridates now holds the home-court advantage), particularly when you don’t realize that sinister and powerful forces are drawing you in, and you must solve the mystery of Antipater’s message before it gets you and others killed.

Wrath of the Furies is a fine addition to Steven Saylor’s excellent Roma Sub Rosa ancient history-mystery series.

Si Dunn

 

 

 

 

 

The Survivors: A complex mystery unfolds in this good series-debut novel – #fiction #bookreview

 

The Survivors

A Cal Henderson Novel

Robert Palmer

Seventh Street Books – paperback, Kindle

 

What a swamp a single lie can lead to.

Washington, D.C., psychologist Cal Henderson thinks this to himself while he is trying, years later, to sort out the real reasons behind why his two young brothers and father were shot to death. and then his mother committed suicide as he watched, helpless.

Cal’s friend, Scottie Glass, also was shot and badly wounded that day. But just before Cal’s mother took her own life, she saw Cal in an upstairs window and signaled him, strangely, to get down, to hide.

Why had she killed four people including herself and left Cal’s friend critically injured, yet warned Cal to hide? Hide from what? Or whom?

Until now, Cal has managed to keep most of these childhood horrors somewhat in check, stored far back in his mind. His psychology practice is thriving, and his clients have many issues of their own to keep his mind occupied and challenged.

Then Scottie Glass suddenly shows up after many years, fiercely determined to find out who really shot him and all of the others. And the way Scottie starts confronting important people in the nation’s capitol of purchased power and influence quickly lands him–and Cal, by association–on the FBI’s radar. Cal’s job, at first, is to try to keep Scottie out of jail. But Cal soon is drawn into his friend’s dogged investigation and soon has to take the lead as Scottie keeps using his computer skills to uncover more and more links and leads that could answer Cal’s questions, too.

A caution: The Survivors likely will not be a “fast read.” The story is complex. And it is well written, with many characters, details, and settings. So be patient; give things time to develop. For me, the story began to click solidly into place at page 75, when FBI agent Jamie Weston tells Cal: “D.C. is a whole different universe. You think you’re playing Go Fish for this guy Scott Glass. Then you find out the game is really Poker and the man holding all the cards is some sort of senator or lobbyist you’ve never heard of.”

Indeed, how a years-ago murder-suicide can have a bearing on present-day, multi-billion-dollar defense contracts is just one part of the intricate mystery that unfolds in this series-debut first novel written by Robert Palmer, a practicing Washington, D.C., lawyer and law professor.

Si Dunn