Node.js Design Patterns

Design and implement production-grade Node.js applications using proven patterns and techniques, 3rd Edition

Mario Casciaro and Luciano Mammino

Packt Publishing

Node.js often is thought of simply as a small but helpful tool for working with JavaScript code while developing applications. The two writers of (paid link) Node.js Design Patterns, 3rd Edition, however, show that Node.js is much more than a minor helpmate. They call it a major “innovation” in the challenging world of web development.

In their view, “the most important aspect of Node.js lies in its ecosystem: the npm package manager, its constantly growing database of modules, its enthusiastic and helpful community, and most importantly, its very own culture based on simplicity, pragmatism, and extreme modularity.”

Along with clear descriptions of how Node.js works, their updated and expanded third edition (paid link) offers “proven patterns and techniques” for designing and implementing production-grade applications using Node.js.

They delve into Node’s single-threaded programming model, its asynchronous architecture, and its deliberate emphasis on creating modules that do one thing well. And they describe how these approaches provide important benefits and advantages to developers who need to design applications that can be developed, tested, scaled, and maintained more easily.

In keeping with the “Node way” of application developement, their book lays out a ready-to-use “set of patterns to solve common Node.js design and coding problems.” The two authors discuss and illustrate how to write “scalable and efficient Node.js applications.” And they explain how to code in “modern” JavaScript, including “class syntax, promises, generator functions, and async/await.” They also point out differences between CommonJS and ESM (ECMAScript modules) and show how to handle those differences in Node.js.

If you develop applications using JavaScript, you may already have at least some basic experience with Node.js. Whether you are an experienced developer or just getting started, consider getting Node.js Design Patterns, 3rd Edition (paid link) and keeping it handy as an important reference source. It is well written and well structured. And, at 600+ pages, it covers a wide range of topics, from callbacks and events to messaging and integration patterns, plus more.

Si Dunn

(My thanks to Packt for sending a copy for review consideration.)

NOTE: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Enraged about Bob Woodward’s ‘Rage’?

Yes, when it comes to Bob Woodward’s Rage, (paid link) there are matters to be mad about, such as why didn’t Woodward let us know what he knew regarding Trump downplaying COVID-19’s dangers when he first knew it? And there are basic questions to be asked, such as: why has Woodward’s book been timed for release on roughly the same schedule as several other new books exposing aspects of Trump and his grifts-a-minute administration?

For example, (paid links follow) there’s Michael Cohen’s Disloyal. And there’s Peter Strzok’s Compromised. Or, how about Stephanie Winston Wolkoff’s Melania and Me, etc. Indeed, a long list of tell-mostly-all books has emerged and will keep emerging between now and November and beyond.

Bottom line: Everyone wants to (and will try) make money off the presidential election. Including those who write, publish, and sell books.

One does not write a controversial book overnight and get it past all of the requiste lawyers in a hurry. And publishers, not writers, play most of the key roles in how, where, and when a book gets published and becomes available for distribution. (paid link below)

Rage by Bob Woodward, Simon & Schuster.

Another bottom line: What if the combined impact of these books, including (paid link) Rage, helps limit the Trump presidency to one term–or less?

If Woodward had released his information a lot earlier, what if it had gotten lost under six or ten other controversies and banner headlines regard the Trump Administration and COVID-19? Republicans would have done a full-court press on damage control and offered full-throated denials. How many lives would have been saved by a squashed disclosure buried under their avalanche of disinformation and what-about-isms? Yes, many lives needlessly have been lost, and Trump deserves much of the blame–him, the Republican Party, and all of Trump’s mask-rejecting, social-distance-rejecting, vaccine-disparging cult followers. Meanwhile, our political attention spans are on full alert now. We are angry and ready to act.

You’re free to rage at Bob Woodward’s Rage. (Yep, another paid link). But rage also that our entire political system is now drowning 20,000 leagues deep under a sea of dark money, and just about everyone (in power or not) is wanting to reach into that vast money bag and grab a few coins.

Si Dunn

NOTE: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.