JavaScript Application Design: A book you likely need if you are working with, or still learning, JavaScript – #programming #bookreview

JavaScript Application Design

A Build First Approach

Nicolas Bevacqua

Manning – paperback

 

I didn’t know how much I needed this book until I started reading it and exploring its code examples.

Many of us who have worked with JavaScript started our connections to the language in very haphazard fashions. We learned some of it on the job, under deadline pressure to fix or update somebody else’s code. Or we took an introductory class or two and then started picking up whatever else we could on the fly, including the bad habits of others around us who seemed to know a bit more about JavaScript than we knew at the moment.

Unfortunately, JavaScript is a big, messy programming language, and it offers numerous opportunities to crash and burn if you really don’t know what you are doing.

In his new book, JavaScript Application Design, Nicolas Bevacqua makes a compelling case for using “the Build First philosophy of designing for clean, well-structured, and testable applications before you write a single line of code.”

He writes: “You’ll learn about process automation, which will mitigate the odds of human error…. Build First is the foundation that will empower you to design clean, well-structured, and testable applications, which are easy to maintain and refactor. Those are the two fundamental aspects of Build First: process automation and design.”

In his well-written text, he argues: “Front-end development requires as much dedication to architecture planning and design as back-end development does. Long gone are the days when we’d copy a few snippets of code off the internet, paste them in our page, and call it a day. Mashing together JavaScript code as an afterthought no longer holds up to modern standards. JavaScript is now front and center.”

He continues: “We have many frameworks and libraries to choose from, which can help you organize your code by allowing you to write small components rather than a monolithic application. Maintainability isn’t something you can tack onto a code base whenever you’d like; it’s something you have to build into the application, and the philosophy under which the application is designed, from the beginning. Writing an application that isn’t designed to be maintainable translates into stacking feature after feature in an ever-so-slightly tilting Jenga tower.”

Bevacqua divides his nine-chapter book into just two parts: build processes and managing complexity. Here is how the chapters are organized:

  • PART 1: BUILD PROCESSES
    1 – Introduction to Build First
    2 – Composing build tasks and flows
    3 – Mastering environments and the development workflow
    4 – Release, deployment, and monitoring
  • PART 2: MANAGING COMPLEXITY
  • 5 – Embracing modularity and dependency management
    6 – Understanding asynchronous flow control methods in JavaScript
    7 – Leveraging the Model-View-Controller
    8 – Testing JavaScript components
    9 – REST API design and layered service architectures

Bevaqua notes that “Linting is often referred to as the first test you should set up when writing JavaScript. Where linters fail, unit tests come in.” He strongly pushes testing and automation right from the start.

Linting soon leads to Grunt, which Bevaqua uses as a task runner and key build tool (with selected modules) in this book. “Grunt is a tool that allows you to write, configure, and automate tasks–such as minifying a JavaScript file or compiling a LESS style sheet–for your application,” he states. (It also works well on Windows machines, which I find handy.)

Grunt leads to running a bit of Node.js on the command line. And if you’ve never worked with Node.js, Bevacqua takes the reader smoothly through the process of installing it and using it in linting exercises. Indeed, he devotes an entire appendix (B) to installing and running Grunt and picking the right plugins for the right tasks and targets.

One of the best parts of this book, to me, is how the author uses short code examples to introduce a concept, and  then builds upon the examples with helpful descriptions and more short but expanded code samples.

Nicolas Bevacqua offers his readers plenty of helpful how-to and why information. Using his book, I have begun applying the Build First approach to some new projects and learning to how test and automate more of my work. I feel as if I now have a good shot at getting a lot better at JavaScript.

There is one small but important glitch to note: At two points in my preview copy of the book from Manning, Bevacqua shows what he calls a simple way to create bare-minimum JSON manifest files. For example, echo “{}” > package.json. Creating a blank, starting-point manifest file did not work this way for me. Instead, I had to use echo {“name: ” “project-name”} > package.json. The empty package.json issue apparently is somehow related to certain versions of Node’s npm.

Si Dunn 

Learning Dart – A solid guide to basic development using Google’s Dart #programming language – #bookreview

Learning Dart

Learn how to program applications with Dart 1.0, a language specifically designed to produce better-structured, high performance applications 

Ivo Balbaert and Dzenan Ridjanovic

(Packt – Kindle, paperback)

 

The programming language Dart was introduced in late 2011 by Google as a potential replacement for aging JavaScript. But JavaScript, of course, has continued to spread all over the Internet and planet since it first appeared in 1995.

Not surprisingly, Google found itself getting some pushback from software developers and others who have a lot of time, education, sweat and money invested into creating, supporting and modernizing files that have .js extensions.

Dart today is billed as “a new platform for scalable web app engineering.” It is a long way from replacing JavaScript. Indeed, it compiles to JavaScript.

At the same time,  Dart is a good and powerful Open Source language. And, while it is not yet seen on most lists of top languages to know, it is gaining momentum and followers in the software world.

“Dart looks instantly familiar to the majority of today’s programmers coming from a Java, C#, or JavaScript/ActionScript background; you will feel at ease with Dart,” write the authors of Learning Dart.

“However, this does not mean it [Dart] is only a copy of what already exists; it takes the best features of the statically typed ‘Java-C#’ world and combines these with features more commonly found in dynamic languages such as JavaScript, Python, and Ruby. On the nimble, dynamic side[,] Dart allows rapid prototyping, evolving into a more structured development familiar to business app developers when application requirements become more complex.”

In their recent book,  Balbaert and Ridjanovic note this about Dart: “Its main emphasis lies on building complex (if necessary), high-performance, and scalable-rich client apps for the modern web.”

Likewise, they point out that  “Dart can also run independently on servers. Because Dart clients and servers can communicate through web sockets (a persistent connection that allows both parties to start sending data at any time), it is in fact an end-to-end solution. It is perfect on the frontend for developing web components with all the necessary application logic, nicely integrated with HTML5 and the browser document model (DOM).

“On the backend server side, it can be used to develop web services, for example, to access databases, or cloud solutions in Google App Engine or other cloud infrastructures. Moreover, it is ready to be used in the multicore world (remember, even your cell phone is multicore nowadays) because a Dart program can divide its work amongst any number of separate processes, called isolates, an actor-based concurrency model as in Erlang.”

Their well-written book, from Packt Publishing, delivers a structured and nicely paced overview of how to use the Dart programming language. The book is suited for inexperienced developers and experienced developers alike who are curious about, or ready to dig into, Dart .

The intended audience, the authors state, includes “…web application programmers, game developers, and other software engineers. Because of its dual focus (Dart and HTML5), the book can appeal to both web developers who want to learn a modern way of developing web applications, and to developers who seek guidance on how to use HTML5.”

Indeed, in the first chapter, you get more than the obligatory “Hello, World!” program. You also learn how to use the Eclipse-based Dart Editor to create some simple command-line and web applications.

From there, the 12-chapter work focuses on topics and software examples that range from variables, classes and libraries, to combining HTML forms with Dart, building games with HTML5 and Dart, developing business apps with Polymer web components, using Dart with MVC web and UI frameworks, working with local data and client-server communications, and creating data-driven web applications using Dart and MySQL or MongoDB.

I have tested some of the book’s code examples both on Linux and Windows machines and have enjoyed working with the Dart Editor. However, I did find a couple of code typos in the print version while hand-typing some of the shorter examples. The better choice is to download and use the book’s code examples found on the Packt website.

One other matter that some new Dartisans may encounter: Norton 360 antivirus software currently tends to throw dart.exe into quarantine on Windows machines–and that stops Dart cold. There is a fairly simple way to retrieve the file from quarantine and tell Norton 360 to let it run. However, check the Dart community page on Google+ for info on that and some other approaches to avoiding the problem.

Learning Dart was published soon after Dart 1.0 was released, and Dart has continued to evolve fairly quickly. (Its stable version was 1.4.3 at the time this was written.) So there will be some small differences in screen displays and other matters.

If you want to learn Dart and get up to speed for using it in application development, Learning Dart can be your handy and solid how-to guide.

Si Dunn

 ***

Ready to get Learning Dart? Click here: Kindlepaperback

Enterprise Application Development with Ext JS and Spring – (And a lot more!) – #programming #bookreview

Enterprise Application Development with Ext JS and Spring

Develop and deploy a high-performance Java web application using Ext JS and Spring

Gerald Gierer

(Packt Publishing paperback, Kindle)

A powerful JavaScript web framework such as Ext JS deserves a powerful platform for enterprise desktop application development. Gerald Gierer delivers a good one in his well-crafted new how-to book from Packt Publishing.

Gierer’s book is a bit unusual in today’s pare-it-down marketplace. It contains many before, during and after screen prints to illustrate the actions and outcomes of steps and commands. The 446-page book also has lengthy code listings that enable you to check and verify the outcomes of code changes you have made.

Ext JS and the Spring framework, however, are just a few of the packages that you work with as you set up your development tools and create, modify, expand, test and deploy a sample enterprise application (a task time tracker).

The other programs and tools include MySQL, the Java SE development kit (with the new Java API for JSON), NetBeans, Maven, Glassfish, and JUnit. And, with Ext JS, you learn to work with the Sencha Cmd tool and the Ext JS Software Development Kit (SDK).

But please note, particularly if you are new to some of this : You must pay careful attention to each paragraph as you load and configure software and as you keep building and enhancing your enterprise application.

In this book, it is easy start jumping from one screen print to the next, or from one code listing to the next, while skipping the intervening text. When you do, you can miss key steps that sometimes are buried without highlights in the wording.

This was my first time to work with some of the required software packages, so I had to force myself to really slow down and pay close attention to each paragraph, as well as each graphic.  My initial development attempt went off the rails when I discovered, more than 100 pages into the book, that I had misconfigured a couple of tables, skipped a couple of data changes, and generally screwed up the database. And, being new to some of the software, I couldn’t figure out to repair everything. So I simply started over from scratch and this time moved carefully from one page to the next, closely checking code entries and the book’s text before clicking “Enter.” That made all the difference in my results.

If you are looking to do enterprise application development with a JavaScript framework, definitely consider Ext JS and definitely consider Gerald Gierer’s fine Enterprise Application Development with Ext JS and Spring.

And definitely take your time as you work your way through his book.

Si Dunn

Rapid Android Development – Using Processing to build apps fast – #programming #bookreview

Rapid Android Development

Build Rich, Sensor-Based Applications with Processing
Daniel Sauter
(Pragmatic Bookshelfpaperback)

The main goal of Daniel Sauter’s nicely written new book is to help you learn “how to develop interactive, sensor-based Android apps” quickly.

At first glance, you may question how “quickly” you can go through 13 chapters with a total of 363 pages, including the index.

But there’s good news here, particularly if you are not a patient programmer. The book is divided into five parts, all structured to serve as “self-contained mini-courses.” And the author has geared his text toward six semi-specific categories of readers.

Sauter, by the way, is an artist and educator with some eight years’ experience teaching Processing. Processing is a free “award-winning, graphics-savvy” programming language and development environment that can be used to work with Android devices and software.

Let’s go to the six reader categories first. Rapid Android Development is aimed at:

  1. Readers with at least “a basic understanding of programming concepts….”
  2. Intermediate Processing users “looking to create Android apps from within the Processing IDE….”
  3. “Educators who teach courses on mobile technologies” and need “a free tool that does not require developer licenses or subscriptions.”
  4. Java and Android developers who want to use Processing to leverage “a host of libraries for productivity gains.” (Java developers will quickly see that Processing builds on Java.)
  5. JavaScript and Web developers who want to use Processing.js syntax to help them create “JavaScript-powered web applications that can run inside browsers without plugins or other modifications. Processing.js also takes advantage of WebGL hardware acceleration.”
  6. Arduino users and hobbyists, particularly those “interested in adapting Android phones or tablets for use as sensing devices, controllers, or graphics processors.”

Now let’s look at the five parts of Rapid Android Development.

  • Part I focuses on installing Processing and the Android SDK but also looks at touch screens and Android sensors and cameras.
  • Part II is devoted to “working with the camera and location devices found on most Androids.”
  • Part III’s emphasis is on peer-to-peer networking, including Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Direct, plus Near Field Communication (NFC), which is “expected to revolutionize the point-of-sale industry,” Sauter notes.
  • Part IV “deals with data and storage,” he adds, “as all advanced apps require some sort of data storage and retrieval to keep user data up-to-date.”
  • Part V examines 3D graphics and cross-platform apps.

You will need several software tools and at least one Android device to work with the code examples in this book. (The book lists several Android phones and tablets that have been tested with the code examples, which are available online.)

If you want to do some work in Part III, you will need at least two Android devices (so your peer can have a peer). And if you have absolutely no programming experience, you should get some first. Sauter, an associate professor of New Media art at the University of Illinois–Chicago School of Art and Design, offers some suggestions for good sources.

His new book seems a bit light on illustrations. But its well-displayed, well-explained code examples and clear how-to paragraphs keep the reader moving and making progress.

If you are a creative coder looking for some new skills, projects and challenges, check out Rapid Android Development, ASAP.

Si Dunn 

The Modern Web: Multi-Device Web Development with HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript – #bookreview

The Modern Web
Multi-Device Web Development with HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript
Peter Gasston
(No Starch Press – Kindle, paperback)

After a quick first glance, you might look right past this book. You might assume its title, “The Modern Web,” simply introduces some kind of heavily footnoted, academic study of the Internet.

Not so, Web breath. In this case, it’s the subtitle that should grab your attention.

Whether you hope to go into web development, or you’re already there, Peter Gasston’s new book can help you get an improved grasp on three important, device-agnostic tools that will be essential to your work and career development. They are: HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript, that not-so-simple programming language that many new web specialists often try to avoid learning. (That’s because, typically, it’s easier, more fun and a bit less cryptic to work with HTML5 and CSS3.)

Also, Gasston notes, there have been big explosions in the number of libraries and frameworks that use JavaScript, further clouding a developer’s ability to know which ones he or she should learn next. (The author limits his coverage to four: jQuery, YepNope, Modernizr, and Mustache.)

Gasston’s well-written book zeroes in on the three “web technologies that can be used anywhere, from open websites to device-specific web apps.” And on all sorts of devices, ranging from tiny phones to tablet computers to wall-covering HDTVs.

And his teaching aim is to show you “modern coding methods and techniques that you can use to build websites across multiple devices or that are tailored to the single device class you’re targeting.”

By the way, “websites” is simply a shorthand term the author uses “to avoid repetition. The features you’ll learn from this book are relevant to websites, web applications, [and] packaged HTML hybrid applications–in short, anything that can use HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.”

Gasston also wants you to learn that “fast” is the main thing that matters to those who will use your site. “Your site needs to be fast–and feel fast–regardless of the device it’s being displayed on,” he emphasizes. “And fast means not only technical performance (which is incredibly important) but also the responsiveness of the interface and how easily users can navigate the site and find what they need to complete the task that brought them to you in the first place.”

His 243-page book contains many short, useful code examples and illustrations, and is excellent for developers who have at least a little bit of experience with HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript but aren’t sure where and how to focus their energies and attention for the rapidly changing career road ahead.

The Modern Web offers a well-organized introduction, plus 11 chapters:

  1. The Web Platform
  2. Structure and Semantics
  3. Device Responsive CSS
  4. New Approaches to CSS Layouts
  5. Modern JavaScript
  6. Device APIs
  7. Images and Graphics
  8. New Forms
  9. Multimedia
  10. Web Apps
  11. The Future

There also are two appendices: Browser Support as of March 2013 and Further Reading.

Peter Gasston has been a web developer for more than 12 years, and his previous book is The Book of CSS3.

He notes that “[t]he Web is constantly evolving, and book publishing means taking just a single snapshot of a moment. Some things will change; some will wither and be removed. I’ve tried to mitigate this by covering only technologies that are based on open standards rather than vendor-specific ones and that already have some level of implementation in browsers.”

He urges developers to stay alert to changing Web standards and to “be curious, be playful, keep on top of it all. He stresses: “There’s never been a more exciting time to work in web development, but you’ll need to put in an extra shift to really take advantage of it.”

Si Dunn

Building Web, Cloud, & Mobile Solutions with F# – #programming #bookreview

Building Web, Cloud, & Mobile Solutions with F#
Daniel Mohl
(O’Reilly – paperback, Kindle)

F# (pronounced “F-sharp”) is a relatively new functional, open-source programming language developed by Microsoft and the F# Software Foundation. F# can be used to create scalable applications with ASP.NET MVC 4, ASP.NET Web API, Windows Communication Foundation (WCF), Windows Azure, HTML5, Web Sockets, CSS3, jQuery Mobile, and other tools.

Daniel Mohl’s Building Web, Cloud, & Mobile Solutions with F# is a well-written guide to “everything you need to know to start building web, cloud, and mobile solutions with F#.” Mohl also give some how-to examples using a range of technologies, libraries, and platforms, including SignalR, CouchDB, RavenDB, MongoDB, and others.

Mohl says his book is “intended for technologists with experience in .NET who have heard about the benefits of F#, have a cursory understanding of the basic syntax, and wish to learn how to combine F# with other technologies to build better web, cloud, and mobile solutions.”

In other words, this should not be your first book about F# or the relevant technologies that also are covered. Mohl recommends Chris Smith’s Programming F#, 3.0 as a first step toward learning the language.

In its 160 pages, Building Web, Cloud, & Mobile Solutions with F# offers five chapters, three appendices, and a number of code samples and screen shots. The chapters and appendices are:

  • 1. Building an ASP.NET MVC 4 Web Application with F#
  • 2. Creating Web Services with F#
  • 3. To the Cloud! Taking Advantage of Azure
  • 4. Constructing Scalable Web and Mobile Solutions
  • 5. Functional Frontend Development
  • Appendix A: Useful Tools and Libraries
  • Appendix B: Useful Websites
  • Appendix C: Client-Site Technologies That Go Well with F#

Mohl’s text also contains numerous links to important and useful websites.

He notes that “the primary focus of this book is on how to use F# to best complement the larger technology stack”, so he spends “a lot more time talking about controllers and models than views. F# provides several unique features that lend themselves well to the creation of various aspects of controllers and models.”

Si Dunn

iOS 6 Programming Cookbook – Updated for the new SDK – #iOS #programming #bookreview

iOS 6 Programming Cookbook
Vandad Nahavandipoor
(O’Reilly –
paperback, Kindle)

If you are a new iOS developer, you can learn many things quickly from this hefty book. And even if you are an iOS veteran, you can gain some important new insights.

The iOS 6 cookbook has been completely updated to cover the recently released iOS 6 SDK. And the author is a well-known and well-experienced developer of iOS apps.

The 20-chapter book begins with the basics of programming for the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, using Objective-C. But it is not intended for beginners who are just learning to program.

In some forums, debates continue to rage over whether new programmers who want to create iOS apps should dive straight into learning Objective-C or study traditional C first and perhaps other programming languages before tackling Objective-C.

No opinion is offered in this well-written, well-organized book. It is just assumed that “you are comfortable with the iOS development environment and know how to create an app for the iPhone or iPad.”

The book’s  focus, the author says, is on explaining “frameworks and classes that are available in iOS 6 SDK” and teaching the reader “the latest and greatest APIs. As you know, some users of your apps may still be on older versions of iOS, so please consider those users and choose your APIs wisely, depending on the minimum iOS version that you want to target with your apps.”

Here is the chapter line-up for iOS 6 Programming Cookbook:

  1. The Basics
  2. Implementing Controllers and Views
  3. Auto Layout and the Visual Format Language
  4. Constructing and Using Table Views
  5. Storyboards
  6. Concurrency
  7. Core Location and Maps
  8. Implementing Gesture Recognizers
  9. Networking, JSON, XML, and Twitter
  10. Audio and Video
  11. Address Book
  12. Files and Folder Management
  13. Camera and the Photo Library
  14. Multitasking
  15. Core Data
  16. Dates, Calendars, and Events
  17. Graphics and Animations
  18. Core Motion
  19. iCloud
  20. Pass Kit

Vandad Nahavandipoor’s important new iOS 6 cookbook offers hundreds of how-to examples and code samples that can help solve problems and give well-defined starting points and frameworks for developers at all levels of experience.

The topics and code samples range from the basic, such as testing new iOS apps by running them on the iOS simulator, to the advanced, such as using Apple’s Pass Kit to create digitally signed coupons, tickets or passes that can be delivered to compatible iOS devices running iOS 6 or later.

Si Dunn