Making Sense of NoSQL – A balanced, well-written overview – #bigdata #bookreview

Making Sense of NoSQL

A Guide for Managers and the Rest of Us
Dan McCreary and Ann Kelly
(Manning, paperback)

This is NOT a how-to guide for learning to use NoSQL software and build NoSQL databases. It is a meaty, well-structured overview aimed primarily at “technical managers, [software] architects, and developers.” However, it also is written to appeal to other, not-so-technical readers who are curious about NoSQL databases and where NoSQL could fit into the Big Data picture for their business, institution, or organization.

Making Sense of NoSQL definitely lives up to its subtitle: “A guide for managers and the rest of us.”

Many executives, managers, consultants and others today are dealing with expensive questions related to Big Data, primarily how it affects their current databases, database management systems, and the employees and contractors who maintain them. A variety of  problems can fall upon those who operate and update big relational (SQL) databases and their huge arrays of servers pieced together over years or decades.

The authors, Dan McCreary and Ann Kelly, are strong proponents, obviously, of the NoSQL approach. It offers, they note, “many ways to allow you to grow your database without ever having to shut down your servers.” However, they also realize that NoSQL may not a good, nor affordable, choice in many situations. Indeed, a blending of SQL and NoSQL systems may be a better choice. Or, making changes from SQL to NoSQL may not be financially feasible at all. So they have structured their book into four parts that attempt to help readers “objectively evaluate SQL and NoSQL database systems to see which business problems they solve.”

Part 1 provides an overview of NoSQL, its history, and its potential business benefits. Part 2 focuses on “database patterns,” including “legacy database patterns (which most solution architects are familiar with), NoSQL patterns, and native XML databases.” Part 3 examines “how NoSQL solutions solve the real-world business problems of big data, search, high availability, and agility.” And Part 4 looks at “two advanced topics associated with NoSQL: functional programming and system security.”

McCreary and Kelly observe that “[t]he transition to functional programming requires a paradigm shift away from software designed to control state and toward software that has a focus on independent data transformation.” (Erlang, Scala, and F# are some of the functional languages that they highlight.) And, they contend: “It’s no longer sufficient to design a system that will scale to 2, 4, or 8 core processors. You need to ask if your architecture will scale to 100, 1,000, or even 10,000 processors.”

Meanwhile, various security challenges can arise as a NoSQL database “becomes popular and is used by multiple projects” across “department trust boundaries.”

Computer science students, software developers, and others who are trying to stay knowledgeable about Big Data technology and issues should also consider reading this well-written book.

Si Dunn

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Functional JavaScript – Applying functional techniques and Underscore.js – #programming #bookreview

Functional JavaScript
Introducing Functional Programming with Underscore.js
Michael Fogus
(O’Reilly – paperback, Kindle)

When I first started tinkering with JavaScript, object-oriented programming (OOP) was the rage, and JavaScript frequently was touted as one of the key object-oriented languages. After all, according to many online descriptions, almost everything within JavaScript “is OO.”

Now, in this enjoyable new book, JavaScript is hailed as a functional programming language. Of course, functional programming recently has been the rage in many programming circles. And “enjoyable” may seem an odd word to attach to a software text. Yet, it fits. Michael Fogus shows here that he is a technical writer who can be entertaining, effective and well-organized.

“This book,” he states, “is not about spewing dogma regarding the virtues of functional programming. I think there are many functional techniques that offer ways to rein in the complexities of software development, but I realize that at times, there are better ways to implement any given individual part.”

It is possible, of course, to debate object-oriented vs. functional JavaScript until the digital cows are called back home and put into infinite loops. But, for those who don’t know or care much about the differences, here are some basic views.

The Mozilla Developers Network (to simply pick  one example) discusses objected-oriented JavaScript on its site and declares: “Object-oriented programming may be seen as the design of software using a collection of cooperating objects, as opposed to a traditional view in which a program may be seen as a collection of functions, or simply as a list of instructions to the computer. In OOP, each object is capable of receiving messages, processing data, and sending messages to other objects. Each object can be viewed as an independent little machine with a distinct role or responsibility.”

Meanwhile, HaskellWiki offers this explanation of functional programming: “In functional programming, programs are executed by evaluating expressions, in contrast with imperative programming where programs are composed of statements which change global state when executed. Functional programming typically avoids using mutable state.

“Functional programming requires that functions are first-class, which means that they are treated like any other values and can be passed as arguments to other functions or be returned as a result of a function. Being first-class also means that it is possible to define and manipulate functions from within other functions.”

Some of the programming languages typically labeled “functional” include Clojure, OCaml, Erlang,  Haskell, Scala, and F#.

Here is how Michael Fogus defines functional programming:

“As a bare-bones introduction, functional programming can be described in a single sentence:

Functional programming is the use of functions that transform values into units of
abstraction, subsequently used to build software systems.

“This is a simplification bordering on libel,” he continues, “but it’s functional (ha!) for this early stage in the book. The library that I use as my medium of functional expression in JavaScript is Underscore, and for the most part, it adheres to this basic definition.”

(Underscore.js can be obtained from http://underscorejs.org and imported into “the applicable project directories.”)

Fogus refuses, in his text, “to create a false dichotomy and say that functional and object-oriented styles should stand in opposition.” Indeed, he notes that JavaScript supports both models and “systems can and should be composed of both models.”

He also points out that JavaScript can be used with other paradigms, including imperative programming, prototype-based object-oriented programming, and metaprogramming.

“In no way does this book represent even a modicum of original thinking regarding functional programming in JavaScript,” he states. Yet, it is a worthy effort.

It is well written, smoothly organized, and nicely illustrated with short code examples and helpful diagrams. And Fogus notes that JavaScript does have “[l]anguage oddities, unsafe features, and a sea of competing libraries” that raise concerns when it is selected for a project. Functional programming, he contends, can be one way to help ensure that JavaScript “can be not only safe, but also simple to understand and test, in addition to being proportionally scalable to the size of the code base.”

Here is the chapter lineup for Fogus’s 237-page book:

  • Chapter 1. Introducing Functional JavaScript
  • Chapter 2. First-Class Functions and Applicative Programming
  • Chapter 3. Variable Scope and Closures
  • Chapter 4. Higher-Order Functions
  • Chapter 5. Function-Building Functions
  • Chapter 6. Recursion
  • Chapter 7. Purity, Immutability, and Policies for Change
  • Chapter 8. Flow-Based Programming
  • Chapter 9. Programming without Class

Functional JavaScript is a winner on at least two counts: (1) as a how-to text for long-time JavaScript programmers wishing to learn more about functional programming; and (2) as a how-to text for long-time functional programmers desiring to learn more about JavaScript.

The book is not recommended for JavaScript newcomers who are still at the level of typing console.log(“The answer to everything in the universe is 42”). However, experienced beginners can learn from it, and so can those of us who just tinker with JavaScript periodically and use it mainly to work with Node.js, Backbone.js, Ember.js, CoffeeScript, HTML and other choices.

Si Dunn

Building Web, Cloud, & Mobile Solutions with F# – #programming #bookreview

Building Web, Cloud, & Mobile Solutions with F#
Daniel Mohl
(O’Reilly – paperback, Kindle)

F# (pronounced “F-sharp”) is a relatively new functional, open-source programming language developed by Microsoft and the F# Software Foundation. F# can be used to create scalable applications with ASP.NET MVC 4, ASP.NET Web API, Windows Communication Foundation (WCF), Windows Azure, HTML5, Web Sockets, CSS3, jQuery Mobile, and other tools.

Daniel Mohl’s Building Web, Cloud, & Mobile Solutions with F# is a well-written guide to “everything you need to know to start building web, cloud, and mobile solutions with F#.” Mohl also give some how-to examples using a range of technologies, libraries, and platforms, including SignalR, CouchDB, RavenDB, MongoDB, and others.

Mohl says his book is “intended for technologists with experience in .NET who have heard about the benefits of F#, have a cursory understanding of the basic syntax, and wish to learn how to combine F# with other technologies to build better web, cloud, and mobile solutions.”

In other words, this should not be your first book about F# or the relevant technologies that also are covered. Mohl recommends Chris Smith’s Programming F#, 3.0 as a first step toward learning the language.

In its 160 pages, Building Web, Cloud, & Mobile Solutions with F# offers five chapters, three appendices, and a number of code samples and screen shots. The chapters and appendices are:

  • 1. Building an ASP.NET MVC 4 Web Application with F#
  • 2. Creating Web Services with F#
  • 3. To the Cloud! Taking Advantage of Azure
  • 4. Constructing Scalable Web and Mobile Solutions
  • 5. Functional Frontend Development
  • Appendix A: Useful Tools and Libraries
  • Appendix B: Useful Websites
  • Appendix C: Client-Site Technologies That Go Well with F#

Mohl’s text also contains numerous links to important and useful websites.

He notes that “the primary focus of this book is on how to use F# to best complement the larger technology stack”, so he spends “a lot more time talking about controllers and models than views. F# provides several unique features that lend themselves well to the creation of various aspects of controllers and models.”

Si Dunn