Get Better with Golang: ‘Go in Practice’

Go in Practice

Matt Butcher and Matt Farina

Manning, paperback

Considerable planning, effort and care have gone into writing Go in Practice, a new Golang programming book from Manning and also available from Amazon.

The book’s structure and approach are both geared toward helping Go newbies move beyond the basics. The writing is clear, and the code examples are focused and not overly long.

Go in Practice opens with a concise refresher on the history, advantages and key features of Go. From there, the 11-chapter book moves into areas that include:

  • Well-rounded applications
  • An interface for your applications
  • Taking your applications to the cloud

In each of these major sections, the authors present some 70 useful and practical techniques, such as:

  • Avoiding CLI boilerplate code
  • Using multiple channels
  • Serving subdirectories
  • Incrementally saving a file
  • Custom HTTP error passing
  • Using protocol buffers

These and the other practical techniques are presented in Problem, Solution and Discussion format. And code examples illustrate (and allow you to try out) what is supposed to happen.

If you are still learning the Golang basics, make this one your next book. Stick with Go in Action or some other starter book, for now. But if you know the basics and are now eager to get more serious about learning and applying this versatile programming language, definitely check out Go in Practice.

If you already are using Go as a development language, it can’t hurt you to take a look at this how-to guide, as well. You may pick up some new and useful techniques.

The two authors, by the way, have been described as”key contributors in the Go ecosystem for years.”

— Si Dunn

 

 

Go in Action – A comprehensive overview, from ‘Hello, Go’ to ‘Testing & Benchmarking’ – #programming #bookreview

Go in Action

William Kennedy, with Brian Ketelsen and Erik St. Martin

Manning – paperback

The authors of Go in Action assume that you are a working developer who is proficient with some other language, such as Java, Ruby, Python, C# or C++.

However, their book is written well, has good illustrations and offers small to moderate-sized code examples. So, someone who is less than a “working developer” also can pick up this work and use it to get a good start on mastering Go.

The Go language, developed at Google, “has concurrency built in.” Also: “Go uses interfaces as the building blocks of code reuse.” And it has “a powerful standard library,” Kennedy, Ketelsen and St. Martin point out. (They are well-known figures in the Go community.)

Some readers likely will mixed feelings about using the online Go Playground rather than downloading and installing the software. But the book’s three authors emphasize: “Go developers use the Playground to share code, ideas, test theories, and debug their code, as you soon will too.”

They add: “Without installing Go on your computer, you can use almost all that Go provides right from your web browser.”

The major topics covered in the book include Go’s language syntax, type system, concurrency, channels, and testing, among others. If you want a clear, concise and reasonably comprehensive overview of Go, consider Go in Action, from the get-go.

Si Dunn