Dante’s Dilemma – A solid mystery featuring a blind psychiatrist as investigator – #bookreview

 

Dante’s Dilemma

A Mark Angelotti Novel

Lynne Raimondo

Seventh Street Books – paperback, Kindle

Lynne Raimondo puts her legal background and well-honed writing skills solidly to work in Dante’s Dilemma, her third Mark Angelotti novel.

Part of the enjoyment of reading this well-crafted mystery is watching the author stretch to keep Dr. Angelotti, a blind psychiatrist, within the confines of his physical limitations, while he discerns clues by using his mind, his hearing and other senses and paying attention to what others say.

As this story unfolds, Angelotti, an expert in treating post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), has had an affair that has wrecked his marriage and reduced his access to his young son. And, testifying as an expert witness for the prosecution in a Chicago murder case associated with domestic violence, he all but helps convict someone who may — or may not — be the killer.

Soon, a link to another homicide emerges, and it has ties to the case where he has testified. And Angelotti now must risk the real possibility of freezing to death in a bad Chicago winter while he tries to find answers to the key question: Is the real murderer already in custody or still out there and about to get away?

Dante’s Dilemma is entertaining mystery fiction, with an intriguingly flawed main character and plenty of twists. And the book illuminates a troubling real-life issue, as well. Domestic violence, author Lynne Raimondo notes in her acknowledgments, “affects an estimated 1.3 million women and their families in the United States annually.”

Si Dunn

 

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‘Little Pretty Things’: An engrossing new mystery from Lori Rader-Day – #bookreview

 

 

Little Pretty Things

Lori Rader-Day

(Seventh Street – paperback, Kindle)

Lori Rader-Day already has proven she can write a good mystery. Her debut book, The Black Hour, won the 2015 Lovey Award for best first novel.

In Little Pretty Things, her forthcoming second novel, the Chicago writer gives us a most unusual investigator: a cart-pushing housekeeper and occasional desk clerk at a rundown cheap motel, the Mid-Night Inn. Juliet Townsend dropped out of college in her first year and went to work at the motel after her father suddenly died and her family’s finances quickly evaporated.

The author sets the scene quickly, with just enough seedy and telling detail. And she gets Juliet Townsend into trouble with the police fairly fast, as well. The housekeeper-desk clerk becomes the chief suspect in the death of a guest who could have easily afforded to stay in a fancier place, but wanted to see Juliet again just before their 10th high school reunion.

Madeline Bell and Juliet had been friends of sorts. Yet Maddy also had been Juliet’s main rival on the Midway, Indiana, high school track team. Maddy always ran faster and won the first-place trophies, while Juliet consistently finished second.

To prove her innocence and find Maddy’s killer, Juliet must somehow get ahead of someone else from her high school class, Courtney Howard, now a police officer who dislikes Juliet and seems determined to nail her for murder.

Available July 7, 2015, Little Pretty Things is an intriguing, entertaining mystery. It is rich with atmosphere, rich with some of the tense realities that people caught in deadend, low-wage jobs often have to face, and rich with desperate determination as Juliet begins her own investigation.

Si Dunn

A new mystery from Terry Shames: ‘A Deadly Affair at Bobtail Ridge’ – #bookreview #mystery

A Deadly Affair at Bobtail Ridge

Terry Shames

(Seventh Street – paperback, Kindle)

The title may be a bit too folksy and over the top for a few hard-core mystery lovers. But the Samuel Craddock investigative series by Terry Shames does an excellent job of capturing the sights, sounds, speech patterns, customs, mannerisms and values of many people in contemporary East Texas, an area of the state that identifies more closely with the Deep South than with the Wild West. And her central character, Samuel Craddock, is both a retired small-town police chief and someone people still quickly turn to for help when there’s trouble.

Even in bucolic East Texas, trouble is always brewing somewhere nearby. And, despite his age and a bad knee, Samuel Craddock can be counted on to try to help, whether it’s defusing bad-blood tensions between two people or two families or, central to each book, tracking down a killer. He knows many people and knows something of their histories. But he is frequently surprised by what happens within the undercurrents that flow through seemingly tranquil small towns and their surrounding countryside.

A Deadly Affair at Bobtail Ridge is the fourth novel in Ms. Shames’s fast-expanding series. Her previous Samuel Craddock mystery,  Dead Broke in Jarrett Creek, was published just six months ago (October, 2014). And it saw Craddock coming out of retirement to take over again, temporarily, as Jarrett Creek’s police chief.

In Deadly Affair, Craddock is still on the job from which he previously retired. And now he is having to go out of his jurisdiction to investigate a complicated case involving a death and a very close friend who isn’t telling him the whole truth about her background.

Terry Shames grew up in East Texas and knows how to make her fictionalized settings and characters come alive.  If you are looking for a new, different and engrossing investigator to follow, slow down, relax a bit and mosey along with Samuel Craddock as he sets out to solve yet another mysterious death.

Si Dunn

 

THE BLUE JOURNAL: A dark, sexy detective novel set in affluent and murderous suburbia – #mystery #bookreview

 

The Blue Journal

A Detective Anthony Walker Novel

L.T. Graham

Seventh Street Books – paperback, Kindle

Anthony Walker had been a good street cop in New York City. But the dangers and grim realities he encountered every day eventually made him fear for the safety of his family. So he took a job as a detective on a suburban Connecticut police force. The move “meant a substantial pay cut and an increase in his cost of living. But Walker felt it was the right thing to do for his wife and daughters,” L.T. Graham writes in this intriguing novel that introduces the “Detective Anthony Walker” series.

Unfortunately, the job turned out to be boring for Walker. “Taken together, all of the incidents of vandalism and burglary he had handled over the past five years were considerably less dangerous than a single midnight-to-eight tour in his old Manhattan precinct,” Graham describes.

But what is worse is that the move also gradually destroyed his marriage, leaving Walker almost friendless and alone in an affluent town where he barely can afford an apartment.

However, a murder case–something very rare in Darien, Connecticut–is about to bring big challenges and big changes to Walker’s life in several ways.

On the one hand, Walker’s boss, Chief Gill, wants the case wrapped up quickly and as quietly as possible. On the other hand, Walker is still a New York cop at heart, and he is not shy about asking blunt, upsetting questions to some of the suburban town’s wealthy movers and shakers.

The murder victim has left behind some kind of diary that seems to brag about her sexual escapades with prominent men and women in Darien. The names are barely coded, and as Walker investigates, he learns that many of the people in the diary, including the victim, are associated in some way with a therapy group conducted by Dr. Randi Conway, “a tall, attractive blonde” psychologist who recently has aroused Walker’s interest. Walker thinks one of the people in the diary could be the killer. But Dr. Conway, of course, has to protect her patients’ confidentiality, even as she finds herself somewhat reluctantly being drawn to Walker–and is not yet aware that her life truly is in danger.

L.T. Graham’s new detective novel is a dark, sexy look at murder and entitled attitudes in affluent suburbia. And Detective Anthony Walker is the kind of dogged detective who just plunges ahead through the subtle and not-so-subtle barriers that keep being thrown in his way.

There is one other mystery within this well-written and entertaining mystery. “L.T. Graham” is a pen name. The writer of this new series is described only as “a New England-based suspense writer who is the author of several novels.”

Si Dunn

BLACK KARMA: A White Ginger Novel – Mystery and action in San Francisco’s Chinatown – #bookreview

 

Black Karma

A White Ginger Novel

Thatcher Robinson

(Seventh Street  – paperback, Kindle)

 

Life definitely is not easy for Bai Jiang, San Francisco’s best-known people-finder (souxun). As a beautiful, and single, female investigator, Bai gets hit on a lot, even by her ex-husband. People also try to hit her, shoot her, or otherwise kill her in some way.

Now she is being offered an arranged marriage that supposedly will give her a big stake in a 30-billion-dollar business–but might be a trap. Plus, she has been asked by a San Francisco police inspector to help track down someone allegedly involved in a botched drug deal that left a police officer dead. And Bai now has three teenage females living in her house–one is her daughter by her ex-husband; the other two are rescues: one from the sex trade and the other from a fearsome gang.

Meanwhile, someone has just tried to kill her investigative partner, Lee. And the person Bai is trying to locate may have some connections that go far beyond mere drug deals and murder.

This second novel in Thatcher Robinson’s new White Ginger series is full of twists, turns, complications, dangers and Chinatown atmosphere. And Bai Jiang is an appealing investigator: a Buddhist who is mostly fearless and definitely skilled with hidden knives, yet also vulnerable to romance, fashion and the plight of women who have been endangered and abused. Definitely recommended if you are looking for a new and unusual investigator to follow.

Si Dunn

 

 

The Sun is God – Adrian McKinty takes readers well off the beaten path with this new historical mystery – #bookreview

 

The Sun is God

Adrian McKinty

Seventh Street Books – Kindle, paperback

Take a weird but true exotic setting. Throw in some real people and real murders. Add to the mix a fictional investigator: Will Prior, an ex-military police lieutenant who deliberately got himself cashiered from the British army during the Boer War following a deadly clash with African prisoners. Wrap it all up with a (very) surprising ending.

The Sun is God, Adrian McKinty’s new historical mystery, likely will please and amaze many readers. Trying to track down a murderer in a 1906 German nudist colony off the coast of New Guinea is a stunning and challenging departure from his Detective Sean Duffy trilogy set in the urban battles and enormous tensions of Northern Ireland in the 1980s.

McKinty is in fine form in this book as he offers up a complicated crime story set within a little-remembered slice of pre-World War I history: Part of New Guinea, north of Australia, was a German colony in the year 1906.

It is here that Will Prior is now living with his “servant girl,” Siwa, amid the colony’s failing banana, rubber and tea plantations.  While still willing to swear allegiance to the British Empire, Will now lives under German rule. So, when a German army officer, Captain Hauptmann Kessler, comes to his house one day, Will fears that it is to take back the money Germany previously loaned him to become a plantation owner. Instead, Will learns that the colony’s governor wants him, because of his past military police experience, to go with Captain Kessler to an island where some German nudists claim to have discovered the secret of immortality.

One of the immortals, unfortunately, has suddenly turned up quite dead. And while the nudists claim the victim died in his bed from malaria, an official autopsy in the capital of German New Guinea has revealed something quite different: the victim drowned and had bruise marks consistent with a struggle.

Things quickly get even more strange after Will and Kessler arrive and have to camp amid the nudists and share their dangerous diet while they attempt to find clues. There’s sex, yes, and drugs. (But the novel is set 50 years before Elvis Presley, so no rock ‘n’ roll.)  And, once danger erupts for the two investigators, they can’t call for backup, and they definitely can’t hide — not on a very small island that boats seldom visit, because it’s thought to be haunted.

Si Dunn

No Stone Unturned and Styx & Stone – An entertaining, engrossing mystery series – #bookreview

No Stone_cover

No Stone Unturned

An Ellie Stone Mystery

James W. Ziskin

(Seventh Street Books – paperback, Kindle)

***

 Styx & Stone

An Ellie Stone Mystery

James W. Ziskin

(Seventh Street Books – paperback, Kindle)

***

 Looking for a new mystery series and investigator to follow? Check out these two engrossing, entertaining novels from James W. Ziskin and Seventh Street Books.

Set in 1960, Styx & Stone, the series debut, and the recently published No Stone Unturned focus on Ellie Stone, a young reporter and photographer working for a small-town newspaper in Upstate New York. She’s struggling to hang onto her first professional job after graduating from the prestigious Columbia Journalism School.

It is a time well before women’s liberation, so Ellie is fighting both to stay afloat and advance  in a career that is still “a man’s world.” Yet, despite the nerve-wracking challenges and the men who fall over themselves as they try to get her into bed, she is glad to have work that doesn’t simply involve “shorthand and fetching coffee.”

Still, Ellie is tired of writing filler copy. She wants to get her hands on some real stories for a change. But she is competing in a male-dominated business and in a male-dominated town where everyone essentially knows everyone else. Thus, everything she does or says is scrutinized and subject to criticism by someone. And she sometimes has a tough time figuring out who really wants to help her and who is just trying to score enough points to make out with her.

Intrepidly, she pushes ahead. And she has a trait born of bravado and curiosity, as well as desperation to keep her job. She is not afraid to confront people and ask questions that others, including the police, have not thought of–or, more dangerously, have not wished to ask.

In Styx & Stone, Ellie leaves Upstate New York long enough to go back home to New York City after her estranged father, a famous Dante scholar and professor, is savagely beaten. The police think he was attacked by burglars, but Ellie is convinced it was a murder attempt and starts asking questions. Soon, another professor is killed, and a second attempt is made on Ellie’s father’s life. Later, he dies of his injuries.

Ellie is so thorough, demanding and even brazen in her probings that, at one point, Detective-Sergeant Jimmo McKeever of the NYPD, complains:  “Are you planning to solve every crime in New York during your stay?” Yet later, while helping her solve the murders,  he concedes a bit awkwardly: “If you were a man, you’d make a good detective.”

Meanwhile, in No Stone Unturned, Ellie is back in Upstate New York, at her newspaper job in the community of New Holland. She is wanting to prove to her boss and her fellow employes that she is a good journalist.

She intends to write  the main, front-page story about a newly discovered murder. But to beat the newspaper’s veteran (and male) crime reporter to the task, she must also solve the murder–quickly.

That means taking dangerous risks and hurriedly confronting powerful people in the community with sharp questions that create more enemies than friends. Along the way, she also must defend herself from being fired from her job. And she must find the inner courage to stick with her fledgling–though currently floundering–newspaper career.

James W. Ziskin’s Ellie Stone is an engaging, intelligent and ambitious young woman who knows both how to fight crime and how to fight her way through many of the historical, social and economic barriers that again restricted American women’s freedoms after World War II.

Si Dunn