Mastering the Nikon D800 – An excellent guide to a very powerful DSLR – #photography #bookreview

Mastering the Nikon D800
Darrell Young
(Rocky Nook,
paperback
)

Darrell Young has written so many books about Nikon digital cameras (this is number eight), he is now widely known as “Digital Darrell.”

His latest, written in a friendly style and nicely illustrated, covers the powerful (and, yes, pricey) Nikon D800 and D800E.

“Few photographers will need more power than the Nikon D800/D800E can deliver,” Young contends. “With this camera, you are well equipped for years to come.”

He points out: “At 36.3-megapixel resolution, the D800 [and D800E] moves soundly into medium-format territory.” This Nikon camera “creates a 16×24-inch (40×60 cm) native print at 300 dpi (using FX format)….” And: “with careful post-processing and enlargement, the images can be made, as National Geographic photographer Jim Brandenburg says, ‘as large as a house!’”

Nikon D800/D800E cameras do come with a fairly detailed instruction manual. But Young’s 560-page how-to guide provides expanded coverage and explanations, clear step-by-step instructions, and many illustrations that show features and choices. He takes you literally from unpacking the golden Nikon box to initial set-up, and then all the way through the camera’s photography and video features, built-in flash and Nikon Creative Lighting System capabilities.

D800/800E cameras can offer an intimidating array of choices and settings, particularly if you are new to digital photography and have bought a D800 or D800E to be your first digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera.

But Young calmly states: “There are five specific settings you should configure when you first turn on the camera, before you shoot any pictures. I’ll walk you through the settings. Later chapters will cover virtually all camera settings in detail.”

As you tackle those later chapters and get deeper into the camera’s settings, he recommends that you go through his book “with your camera in hand ready for configuration. There are literally hundreds of things to configure on this advanced HD-SLR,” he writes.

His text includes links to downloadable resources from two websites hosted by Nikonians Press and Rocky Nook. And Digital Darrell promises: “I intend to keep on adding material to Mastering the Nikon D800.”

Si Dunn

Introducing Regular Expressions – Finding your perfect match…in strings – #bookreview

Introducing Regular Expressions
Michael Fitzgerald
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

“Regular expressions are specially encoded text strings used as patterns for matching sets of strings,” Michael Fitzgerald writes in this example-rich new book that focuses on learning by doing.

Veteran programmers who work with Perl, Java, JavaScript, C# and a number of Unix utilities often consider regular expressions to be an important part of their toolkit. Ruby 1.9 and Python 3 also support regular expressions.

“Regular expressions have a reputation for being gnarly,” Fitzgerald notes. However, using the online Regexpal JavaScript regular expression tester, he shows you how to dive right into the very basics and start working your way up.

He introduces several other applications that let you work with regular expressions. And his chapters smoothly take you from matching single digits to matching text strings, number strings, boundaries such as the beginnings or endings of words, character classes, and beyond, including white-space patterns and Unicode. He also shows how to perform some fairly esoteric operations such as “negative lookaheads,” where you verify that a certain pattern of text or digits does not appear in a string ahead of certain other text, numbers, or other qualifiers.

The 136-page book has ten chapters:

  1. What Is a Regular Expression?
  2. Simple Pattern Matching
  3. Boundaries
  4. Alternation, Groups, and Backreferences
  5. Character Classes
  6. Matching Unicode and Other Characters
  7. Quantifiers
  8. Lookarounds
  9. Marking Up a Document with HTML
  10. The End of the Beginning

An appendix provides a regular expression reference, listing such items as control characters, Unicode whitespace characters, metacharacters, and others. There is also a glossary of regular expression terms, such as “greedy match” and “zero-width assertions.”

Fitzgerald recommends his book for those who are “new to regular expressions or programming…the reader who has heard of regular expressions and is interested in them but who really doesn’t understand them yet.”

Those who are a bit beyond the beginner level, however, likewise can benefit from Introducing Regular Expressions and its handy examples and how-to summaries.

Si Dunn

PayPal APIs: Up and Running – How to monetize your apps – #programming #bookreview #in

PayPal APIs: Up and Running, 2nd Edition
Matthew A. Russell
(O’Reilly,
paperback, list price $29.99; Kindle edition, list price $23.99)

The focus of this book is “monetizing your application with payment flows.” That’s a high-toned way of saying Click here to spend some money or Click here to pay your bill or Click here to donate.

PayPal APIs: Up and Running, 2nd Edition shows how to work with PayPal’s platform, which “offers a vast number of API-based products that allow you to monetize your ideas as seamlessly as possible.” (APIs are application programming interfaces.) The book is written clearly and is well illustrated with diagrams, code examples, screen shots and tables.

According to the author, PayPal’s Name-Value Pair (NVP) Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) make it “simple to integrate payments into your applications.  As the merchant, your web application constructs an NVP string and transmit(s) it via HTTPS (HTTP Secure) to the PayPal authorization server, and PayPal sends back an NVP-formatted response that your web application parses for the information relevant to the payment.”

What Matthew A. Russell’s book does not do is “provide complete or exhaustive documentation on all of PayPal’s products or even provide very specific direction on handling some of the most common idiosyncrasies that you might encounter.” But it does “aim to present some of the most popular products in fully integrated realistic scenarios with sample project code that you can study and adapt for your particular needs.” It shows you how to get started and points you toward sources of more advanced information.

Rather than introduce a new, “distinct sample application” in each chapter, the author’s approach is to use a single, simple application “as a foundation,” and “customize it in various ways according to the content of each chapter….” And the chapters are structured to be mostly standalone.

Early in the opening chapter, the foundation application is built using Python and Google App Engine (GAE). And you begin working with PayPal’s APIs.

The 135-page book is organized as follows:

  • Chapter 1: PayPal API Overview
  • Chapter 2: Express Checkout (Including Mobile Express Checkout)
  • Chapter 3: Express Checkout for Digital Goods
  • Chapter 4: Adaptive Payments (Simple, Parallel, and Chained Payments)
  • Chapter 5: Website Payments Pro (Direct Payment)
  • Chapter 6: Instant Payment Notifications (IPNs)
  • Appendix A: Overview of Tweet Relevance – Tweet Relevance is the book’s sample application, “implemented in Python (one of the easiest-to-read programming languages), runs on Google App Engine (a web application platform that is mature and extremely well documented), and munges data from Twitter (an accessible and extremely rich source of information),” Russell writes.
  • Appendix B: Mobile Payment Libraries (MPLs) – Goes beyond the scope of this book. Contains brief information on PayPal’s MPLs, including creating “in-app purchases for iOS, Android, and BlackBerry,” and gives guidance for finding more information.

Each chapter also contains recommended exercises, and the book’s code examples are available online.

The first edition of PayPal APIs: Up and Running was written by Michael Balderas. PayPal APIs: Up and Running, 2nd Edition builds upon his foundation and covers some new aspects and products of PayPal.

If you are a programmer who wants to accept payments for goods or services through PayPal or help a client accept online payments or donations, you should consider getting this useful and well-focused book.

— Si Dunn

#