Rapid Android Development – Using Processing to build apps fast – #programming #bookreview

Rapid Android Development

Build Rich, Sensor-Based Applications with Processing
Daniel Sauter
(Pragmatic Bookshelfpaperback)

The main goal of Daniel Sauter’s nicely written new book is to help you learn “how to develop interactive, sensor-based Android apps” quickly.

At first glance, you may question how “quickly” you can go through 13 chapters with a total of 363 pages, including the index.

But there’s good news here, particularly if you are not a patient programmer. The book is divided into five parts, all structured to serve as “self-contained mini-courses.” And the author has geared his text toward six semi-specific categories of readers.

Sauter, by the way, is an artist and educator with some eight years’ experience teaching Processing. Processing is a free “award-winning, graphics-savvy” programming language and development environment that can be used to work with Android devices and software.

Let’s go to the six reader categories first. Rapid Android Development is aimed at:

  1. Readers with at least “a basic understanding of programming concepts….”
  2. Intermediate Processing users “looking to create Android apps from within the Processing IDE….”
  3. “Educators who teach courses on mobile technologies” and need “a free tool that does not require developer licenses or subscriptions.”
  4. Java and Android developers who want to use Processing to leverage “a host of libraries for productivity gains.” (Java developers will quickly see that Processing builds on Java.)
  5. JavaScript and Web developers who want to use Processing.js syntax to help them create “JavaScript-powered web applications that can run inside browsers without plugins or other modifications. Processing.js also takes advantage of WebGL hardware acceleration.”
  6. Arduino users and hobbyists, particularly those “interested in adapting Android phones or tablets for use as sensing devices, controllers, or graphics processors.”

Now let’s look at the five parts of Rapid Android Development.

  • Part I focuses on installing Processing and the Android SDK but also looks at touch screens and Android sensors and cameras.
  • Part II is devoted to “working with the camera and location devices found on most Androids.”
  • Part III’s emphasis is on peer-to-peer networking, including Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Direct, plus Near Field Communication (NFC), which is “expected to revolutionize the point-of-sale industry,” Sauter notes.
  • Part IV “deals with data and storage,” he adds, “as all advanced apps require some sort of data storage and retrieval to keep user data up-to-date.”
  • Part V examines 3D graphics and cross-platform apps.

You will need several software tools and at least one Android device to work with the code examples in this book. (The book lists several Android phones and tablets that have been tested with the code examples, which are available online.)

If you want to do some work in Part III, you will need at least two Android devices (so your peer can have a peer). And if you have absolutely no programming experience, you should get some first. Sauter, an associate professor of New Media art at the University of Illinois–Chicago School of Art and Design, offers some suggestions for good sources.

His new book seems a bit light on illustrations. But its well-displayed, well-explained code examples and clear how-to paragraphs keep the reader moving and making progress.

If you are a creative coder looking for some new skills, projects and challenges, check out Rapid Android Development, ASAP.

Si Dunn 

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