The Survivors: A complex mystery unfolds in this good series-debut novel – #fiction #bookreview

 

The Survivors

A Cal Henderson Novel

Robert Palmer

Seventh Street Books – paperback, Kindle

 

What a swamp a single lie can lead to.

Washington, D.C., psychologist Cal Henderson thinks this to himself while he is trying, years later, to sort out the real reasons behind why his two young brothers and father were shot to death. and then his mother committed suicide as he watched, helpless.

Cal’s friend, Scottie Glass, also was shot and badly wounded that day. But just before Cal’s mother took her own life, she saw Cal in an upstairs window and signaled him, strangely, to get down, to hide.

Why had she killed four people including herself and left Cal’s friend critically injured, yet warned Cal to hide? Hide from what? Or whom?

Until now, Cal has managed to keep most of these childhood horrors somewhat in check, stored far back in his mind. His psychology practice is thriving, and his clients have many issues of their own to keep his mind occupied and challenged.

Then Scottie Glass suddenly shows up after many years, fiercely determined to find out who really shot him and all of the others. And the way Scottie starts confronting important people in the nation’s capitol of purchased power and influence quickly lands him–and Cal, by association–on the FBI’s radar. Cal’s job, at first, is to try to keep Scottie out of jail. But Cal soon is drawn into his friend’s dogged investigation and soon has to take the lead as Scottie keeps using his computer skills to uncover more and more links and leads that could answer Cal’s questions, too.

A caution: The Survivors likely will not be a “fast read.” The story is complex. And it is well written, with many characters, details, and settings. So be patient; give things time to develop. For me, the story began to click solidly into place at page 75, when FBI agent Jamie Weston tells Cal: “D.C. is a whole different universe. You think you’re playing Go Fish for this guy Scott Glass. Then you find out the game is really Poker and the man holding all the cards is some sort of senator or lobbyist you’ve never heard of.”

Indeed, how a years-ago murder-suicide can have a bearing on present-day, multi-billion-dollar defense contracts is just one part of the intricate mystery that unfolds in this series-debut first novel written by Robert Palmer, a practicing Washington, D.C., lawyer and law professor.

Si Dunn

 

 

 

 

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‘Hollow Man’: Mark Pryor’s new psychological thriller exposes our inner sociopath – #fiction #bookreview

 

Hollow Man

Mark Pryor

Seventh Street Books – paperback, Kindle

By day, Dominic is a tough prosecutor working in a Texas district attorney’s office. That means he can carry a badge and a gun when he’s not in court getting convictions. By night, he is guitar player and singer with a British accent who is trying to make it big in the highly competitive live-music scene in Austin, Texas. Day and night, however, Dominic is something else entirely: a hidden sociopath who wants to commit a crime.

In Hollow Man, driven in part by several sudden and upsetting changes in his life, Dominic finally decides to take that plunge, setting up what he thinks will be a simple heist that will net a lot of cash. But first, for practice, he needs to break into a pub.

“I wanted to practice,” he says in the book. “I couldn’t do a run-through of the theft itself. It had too many moving parts and also was a matter of planning, not practice. No, I wanted to test myself so I’d know how it felt to be a criminal. After so many years of resisting that very temptation, I needed to break the seal, give up my virginity, phrase it how you will.”

But the break-in goes awry, and so does the supposedly well-planned heist. Indeed, it turns into capital murder. And what happens next becomes a chilling, engrossing journey into the mind of a man whose “fear response is almost zero. If someone close to me is in danger, or even if I am, it’s as stressful as a game of chess.”

In Mark Pryor’s new standalone psychological thriller, the danger and tension just keep rising. And Hollow Man‘s ending is both a masterful and shocking surprise.

Si Dunn

 

Killer UX Design – How to create compelling, user-centered interfaces – #bookreview

Killer UX Design
Jodie Moule
(SitePoint – paperback, Kindle)

The overused term “killer app” tends to kill my curiosity about books with “killer” in the title.

Still,  “killer” title aside, Killer UX Design deserves some attention, particularly if you are struggling to create a better user experience (UX) for products, websites, services, processes, or systems. The eight chapters in this 266-page book provide a well-written “introduction to user experience design.”

The focus, in UX design, is on “understanding the behavior of the eventual users of a product, service, or system. It then seeks to explore the optimal interaction of these elements, in order to design experiences that are memorable, enjoyable, and a little bit ‘wow’,” the author says.

She is a psychologist who co-founded and directs Symplicit, an “experience design consultancy” in Australia. “With the digital and physical worlds merging more than ever before,” she says, “it is vital to understand how technology can enhance the human experience, and not cause frustration or angst at every touchpoint.”

You won’t find JavaScript functions, HTML 5 code, or other programming examples in this book, even though software engineering increasingly is a key factor in UX design. Instead, the tools of choice during initial design phases are: Post-It Notes, index cards, sheets of paper, tape, glue, hand-drawn diagrams and sketches, plus clippings from newspapers, magazines and other materials.

And, you likely will spend time talking with other members of your UX design team, plus potential users of your product, service, or system.

Some of the chapters also deal with prototyping, testing, re-testing and tweaking, and how to modify a design based on what you learn after a product, service, or system has been launched.

A key strength of Killer UX Design is how it  illustrates and explains the real-life — and seldom simple — processes and steps necessary to design an app that is both useful and easy to use.

Si Dunn

A best-seller for your thoughts: Thinking, Fast and Slow – #bookreview

Thinking, Fast and Slow
By Daniel Kahneman
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux, hardback, list price $30.00; Kindle edition, list price $12.99)

Some of us do, but most of us don’t, have an attention shortage. We know how to pay attention. Indeed, these days, we try to pay attention to too many things at once. For example: texting while ordering a mocha, fumbling through a wallet for a credit card, bantering with the person in line behind us, and hearing the coffee barista call out: “Latte for Linda, ready at the bar!” as an ambulance screams by outside and we wonder what happened and who’s inside.

At many moments, our immediate thought processes are badly fragmented by our surroundings, our choices and the expanding reach of our technology. And other things likely may be going on inside our heads within those same attention-splintered instants: sad thoughts; something remembered undone at work; a memory from childhood; a sudden doubt there is a Devil or a God or a solution to America’s growing economic-cultural-political divide; a fear that the oven may not have been turned off when we left home.

We spend a lot of time living and rummaging around inside our heads and wishing we were smarter and better thinkers. So it is hardly a surprise that Daniel Kahneman’s new book, Thinking, Fast and Slow, recently has been running high on best-seller charts and recently has received several prestigious plaudits as one of 2011’s best books.

In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman expands and expounds upon two modes of thinking previously identified by psychologists and he uses the simple labels, System 1 and System 2, previously assigned by psychologists Keith Stanovich and Richard West.

“System 1,” Kahneman says, “operates automatically and quickly, with little or no effort and no sense of voluntary control.” This “fast” level is driven by intuition and emotion.

Meanwhile, “System 2 allocates attention to the effortful mental activities that demand it, including complex computations. The operations of System 2 are often associated with the subjective experience of agency, choice, and concentration.” It is the “slow” thinking level where deliberation and logic hold sway.

These two “systems” do not exist in separate compartments within our brains, of course. They are convenient concepts for trying to better grasp how our thinking processes work and interact — and how they fail us, sometimes.

Writes Kahneman: “System 2 is the only one that can follow rules, compare objects on several attributes, and make deliberate choices between options. The automatic System 1 does not have these capabilities. System 1 detects simple relationships (‘they are all alike,” “the son is much taller than the father’) and excels at integrating information about one thing, but it does not deal with multiple distinct topics at once, nor is it adept at using purely statistical information.”

Daniel Kahneman is a psychologist – with a Nobel Prize in economic sciences. His writings challenging “the rational model of judgment and decision making” have won him acclaim as one of America’s “most important thinkers.” Thinking, Fast and Slow brings together “his many years of research and thinking in one book.”

It is not fast reading, and there have been some reader complaints about formatting glitches in the book’s Kindle edition.

But understanding the two thinking “systems” can help us make better judgments and decisions, Kahneman contends. Particularly if we can become more aware of “the marvels as well as the flaws of intuitive thought” and how Systems 1 and 2 interact within intuition.

States Kahneman: “System 1 is…the origin of much that we do wrong, but it is also the origin of most of what we do right—which is most of what we do,” he writes.

 What we must do better to “block errors that originate in System 1,” he argues, is learn how to learn how to “recognize the signs that you are in a cognitive minefield, slow down, and ask for reinforcement from System 2.”

But “…it is much easier to identify a minefield when you observe others wandering into it than when you are about to do so.”

In many daily situations, you will have to make snap decisions straight out of System 1. Yet, where possible, particularly in business, investing and various critical areas of your personal life, you will be wise to slow down a bit, listen more to System 2 and learn how integrate its powers of logic and deliberation into your choices.

 Thinking, Fast and Slow can help you do this – while it changes the way you think about how you think.

Si Dunn‘s latest book is a detective novel, Erwin’s Law. His other published works include Jump, a novella, and a book of poetry, plus several short stories, including The 7th Mars Cavalry, all available on Kindle. He is a screenwriter, a freelance book reviewer and a former technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist.