Realm of Racket: Learn to Program, One Game at a Time – #Racket #game #programming #bookreview

Realm of Racket
Learn to Program, One Game at a Time!

Matthias Felleisen, David Van Horn, Conrad Barski, M.D., Forrest Bice, Rose DeMaio, Spencer Florence, Feng-Yun Mimi Lin, Scott Lindeman, Nicole Nussbaum, Eric Peterson, and Ryan Plessner
(No Starch Press – paperback, Kindle)

Formerly known as PLT Scheme, Racket is an offshoot of the Lisp/Scheme family of programming languages. (Lisp, which was first specified in 1958, is the second-oldest high-level programming language, behind FORTRAN).

The (numerous) authors of this 294-page book call Racket “a friendly mutation of Lisp” and tout it as “perfect for all, from those who want to launch their education in computer science to those looking to expand their knowledge and experience in programming.”

Lisp has a long learning curve, so the writers have taken special pains to try to make Racket (“a weird-looking programming language,” they concede) approachable and fun by using comics and games built from short code examples.

Their well-written book is aimed at college freshmen readers. But they emphasize “that doesn’t mean you should drop this book if you are a sophomore or an industry professional.” Nor if you are still in high school or simply like to tinker with programming languages for fun and challenge.

“Regardless of your programming background,” they state, “many of the topics in this book will be new to you, and much of what you’ve learned before will appear in a new light.”

Realm of Racket is structured so that you start out programming very simple games and gradually tackle games that are more complex, while learning about such topics as functions, recursion, lambda, lists, structures, loops, testing, and more.

If you are interested in developing special-purpose computer languages that require specific knowledge of specialized fields, Realm of Racket’s  final chapter briefly delves into the field of language engineering. It notes that Racket “makes it particularly easy to create new programming languages, including special-purpose languages.”

Not surprisingly, some people who program in Racket call themselves Racketeers. The open source language and its program development environment (PDE), DrRacket (“Doctor Racket”), can be downloaded from http://racket-lang.org. “Racket can run on Windows, Mac, and *nix* systems,” the authors note.

Realm of Racket can be a fun, challenging book for computer-savvy teens nearing the end of high school or in their first years of college to study computer science or gaming. Younger readers likely won’t stick with it unless they have some helpful, patient guidance from knowledgeable older siblings or adults. Wait until they’ve gotten reasonably good at another language, such as Python, Ruby, C#, or Java, first.

Si Dunn

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