Making Sense of NoSQL – A balanced, well-written overview – #bigdata #bookreview

Making Sense of NoSQL

A Guide for Managers and the Rest of Us
Dan McCreary and Ann Kelly
(Manning, paperback)

This is NOT a how-to guide for learning to use NoSQL software and build NoSQL databases. It is a meaty, well-structured overview aimed primarily at “technical managers, [software] architects, and developers.” However, it also is written to appeal to other, not-so-technical readers who are curious about NoSQL databases and where NoSQL could fit into the Big Data picture for their business, institution, or organization.

Making Sense of NoSQL definitely lives up to its subtitle: “A guide for managers and the rest of us.”

Many executives, managers, consultants and others today are dealing with expensive questions related to Big Data, primarily how it affects their current databases, database management systems, and the employees and contractors who maintain them. A variety of  problems can fall upon those who operate and update big relational (SQL) databases and their huge arrays of servers pieced together over years or decades.

The authors, Dan McCreary and Ann Kelly, are strong proponents, obviously, of the NoSQL approach. It offers, they note, “many ways to allow you to grow your database without ever having to shut down your servers.” However, they also realize that NoSQL may not a good, nor affordable, choice in many situations. Indeed, a blending of SQL and NoSQL systems may be a better choice. Or, making changes from SQL to NoSQL may not be financially feasible at all. So they have structured their book into four parts that attempt to help readers “objectively evaluate SQL and NoSQL database systems to see which business problems they solve.”

Part 1 provides an overview of NoSQL, its history, and its potential business benefits. Part 2 focuses on “database patterns,” including “legacy database patterns (which most solution architects are familiar with), NoSQL patterns, and native XML databases.” Part 3 examines “how NoSQL solutions solve the real-world business problems of big data, search, high availability, and agility.” And Part 4 looks at “two advanced topics associated with NoSQL: functional programming and system security.”

McCreary and Kelly observe that “[t]he transition to functional programming requires a paradigm shift away from software designed to control state and toward software that has a focus on independent data transformation.” (Erlang, Scala, and F# are some of the functional languages that they highlight.) And, they contend: “It’s no longer sufficient to design a system that will scale to 2, 4, or 8 core processors. You need to ask if your architecture will scale to 100, 1,000, or even 10,000 processors.”

Meanwhile, various security challenges can arise as a NoSQL database “becomes popular and is used by multiple projects” across “department trust boundaries.”

Computer science students, software developers, and others who are trying to stay knowledgeable about Big Data technology and issues should also consider reading this well-written book.

Si Dunn

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Introducing Windows Server 2012 – A guide to what’s coming in a much-anticipated release – #bookreview #microsoft

Introducing Windows Server® 2012
Mitch Tulloch with the Microsoft Server Team
(Microsoft Press, paperback, list price $14.99; Kindle edition,
list price $0.00)

 The anticipated release date for the new version of Microsoft Server®  is sometime between the third quarter of 2012 and early 2013. And this book’s introduction hails it as “probably the most significant release of the Windows Server platform ever.”

Windows Server® 2012, it states, will offer “an innovative new user interface, powerful new management tools, enhanced Windows PowerShell support, and hundreds of new features in the areas of networking, storage and virtualization.”

There also will be major emphasis on cloud computing. The product has been “designed for the cloud from the ground up and provides a foundation for building both public and private cloud solutions,” the book declares.

Introducing Windows Server® 2012 is “based on beta,” according to the cover disclaimer. And, according to the author, the book  “represents a ‘first look’ based on the public beta release of Windows Server 2012 and is intended to help IT professionals familiarize themselves with the capabilities of the new platform.”

The 235-page book is divided into five chapters:

  • Chapter 1 presents “The business need for Windows Server® 2012.” Not surprisingly, the main focus is on cloud computing and multi-server platforms.
  • Chapter 2’s focus is “Foundation for building your private cloud” and how the new product can provide “a solid foundation for building dynamic, highly scalable, multi-tenant cloud environments.”
  • Chapter 3 looks at the Windows Server® 2012 features and capabilities that can create a “[h]ighly available, easy-to-manage multi-server platform.”
  • Chapter 4 discusses how you can use the product to “[d]eploy web applications on premises and in the cloud,” with its “scalable and elastic web platform” and “[s]upport for open standards.”
  • Chapter 5 focuses on Windows Server® 2012 features and capabilities that are key to “[e]nabling the modern workstyle.” The author states: “Today’s business users want things simple. They want to be able to access their desktop applications, and data virtually anywhere, from any device, and have the full Windows experience. And from an IT perspective, this must be done securely and in ways that can ensure compliance at all times.”

Since this book is a “first look” written prior to the ready-to-manufacture (RTM) date, some of its screenshots, feature descriptions and stated capabilities may differ somewhat from the product that will be released.

But this overview can be a useful – and inexpensive — guide to have handy while considering whether to move to, or upgrade to, Windows Server® 2012.

Si Dunn

Three new specialized how-to books for SharePoint, JQuery & Mac OS X Lion Server – #bookreview #in #programming

Here are three new books for those with at least some basic to intermediate experience with Microsoft SharePoint, or web development, or Mac OS X Lion.

Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Creating and Implementing Real-World Projects
By Jennifer Mason, Christian Buckley, Brian T. Jackett, and Wes Preston
(Microsoft Press,
paperback, list price $34.99; Kindle edition, list price $27.99)

If you have some background in Microsoft SharePoint and want to dig deeper, this book can help you learn how to use SharePoint to create real-world solutions to ten common business problems.

Each chapter is devoted to a single project, such as creating a FAQ system to help users quickly find answers to their questions, setting up a help desk solution to track service requests, or building a simple project management system.

The projects are based on “various scenarios encountered by the authors as we have used SharePoint as a tool to build solutions that address business needs….Each of the solutions has been implemented in one or more organization,” they state.

Do not jump into Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Creating and Implementing Real-World Projects until you have gained “a general understanding of the basics of SharePoint,” the authors caution. And note that SharePoint is not easily defined as one “type” of product.

If you keep in mind the process of building a house, they write, “SharePoint is like the various tools and materials, and the final business solutions you build are like the house. There are many features and tools in SharePoint, and within this book, you will see different ways to combine and structure them into business solutions.”

Their 403-page book is well written and cleanly organized with short paragraphs and many headings, step lists and illustrations. It also has an extensive index.

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JQuery: Novice to Ninja, 2nd Edition
By Earle Castledine and Craig Sharkie
(SitePoint,
paperback, list price $39.95; Kindle edition, list price $29.95)

Technology changes fast, and web developers curious about JQuery will welcome this updated edition of Earle Castledine’s and Craig Sharkie’s book that first appeared in 2010.

This also is not a book for beginners. “You should,” the authors note, “already have intermediate to advanced HTML and CSS skills, as JQuery uses CSS-style selectors to zero in on page elements. Some rudimentary programming knowledge will be helpful to have,” they add, “as JQuery—despite its clever abstractions—is still based on JavaScript.” 

The authors offer high praise for the power of JQuery: “Aside from being a joy to use, one of the biggest benefits of JQuery is that it handles a lot of infuriating cross-browser issues for you. Anyone who has written serious JavaScript in the past can attest that cross-browser inconsistencies will drive you mad.”

They describe how to download and include the latest version of JQuery in web pages. And their book is organized to introduce JQuery features and code examples while also showing you, step by step, how to build a complete working application.

JQuery: Novice to Ninja, 2nd Edition has plenty of illustrations and is well indexed and written in a friendly, approachable style. 

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Using Mac OS X Lion Server
By Charles Edge
(O’Reilly,
paperback, list price $29.99; Kindle edition, list price $23.99)

Yes, intermediate and advanced system administrators will find some useful information in this well-written and nicely illustrated guide.

“But the book,” says author Charles Edge, “is really meant for new system administrators: the owner of the small business, the busy parent trying to manage all of those iPhone and iPads the kids are running around with, the teacher with a classroom full of iMacs or iPads, and of course, the new podcaster, just looking for a place to host countless hours of talking about the topic of her choice.”

What Using Mac OS X Lion Server  does not cover is “managing a Lion Server from the command line, scripting client management, or other advanced topics.”

The topics it does cover include: Planning for and installing a server; sharing and backing up files; sharing address books, calendars, and iChat; Wikis, webs and blogs; building a mail server; building a podcasting server; managing Apple computers and iOS devices; network services; and deploying Mac OS X computers.

The author cautions: “In many ways, the traditional system administrator will find Lion challenging in its consumeristic approach. There is a lot of power under the hood, but the tools used to manage the server have been simplified so that anyone can manage it, not just veteran Unix gods.”

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. He also is a former newspaper and magazine photojournalist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir. He is the author of an e-book detective novel, Erwin’s Law, now also available in paperback, plus a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Pocket Consultant – Just add LARGE pocket – #bookreview #sxswi #in

Microsoft© SQL Server© 2012 Pocket Consultant
By William P. Stanek
(Microsoft Press,
paperback, list price $39.99; Kindle edition, list price $31.99)

Yes, you will need a big pocket to carry around this 558-page “practical, portable guide.”

It’s intended for: (1) SQL Server administrators; (2) those making the transition to administrator status; and (3) anyone with SQL Server responsibility in a company that is upgrading from older versions to the newest, Microsoft SQL Server 2012.

If your pockets aren’t big enough to do the job, put it in a bag, stick it on a shelf near your workstation, or store it in digital format so you can read it on your mobile device. In other words, get it – whether you are experienced with SQL Server 2012 or still in the process of learning it.

The book is well-written and well-structured. And it is reasonably well-illustrated with screenshots, code samples, tables, notes, tips, lists and step-by-step instructions. It also has been given some good editing: At the time of this review, the book’s errata page showed no confirmed issues.

The author, William R. Stanek, is the series editor for Microsoft’s “Pocket Consultant” books. He has written more than 100 books, and he has more than 20 years’ experience in advanced programming and systems management.

His latest “Pocket Consultant” work is structured into four parts with a total of 12 chapters and a nicely detailed, 23-page index.

Part 1 is titled “Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Essentials.” The chapters are:

  • Chapter 1, Managing Your SQL Servers
  • Chapter 2, Managing SQL Server Services and Clients

Part 2 is “Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Management and Security.” Its chapters are:

  • Chapter 3, Implementing Policy-Based Management
  • Chapter 4, Configuring and Tuning Your SQL Servers
  • Chapter 5, Tuning and Linking Your SQL Servers
  • Chapter 6, Database Administration Essentials
  • Chapter 7, Implementing SQL Server 2012 Security

Part 3 is titled “Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Data Management.” The chapters are:

  • Chapter 8, Manipulating Schemas, Tables, and Views
  • Chapter 9, Using Indexes, Constraints, and Partitions

Part 4 is “Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Optimization, Maintenance, and Recovery.” The chapters are:

  • Chapter 10, Automating and Maintaining SQL Server 2012
  • Chapter 11, SQL Server 2012 Backup and Recovery
  • Chapter 12, SQ: Server 2012 Profiling and Monitoring

The author assumes that you are “fairly familiar with SQL commands and stored procedures as well as the Windows user interface.” He urges that if you are new to SQL and Microsoft SQL Server 2012, pick up a few other books, too. There is, he notes, “simply no way that one book can do it all.”

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Si Dunn is a novelist, screenwriter, freelance book reviewer, and former software technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist. His latest book is Dark Signals, a Vietnam War memoir available soon in paperback. He also is the author of a detective novel, Erwin’s Law, a novella, Jump, and several other books and short stories.

Configuring Microsoft SharePoint 2010 – Self-Study Guide for MCTS exam 70-667 – #microsoft #bookreview

Configuring Microsoft SharePoint 2010
By Dan Holme and Alistair Matthews
(Microsoft Press, list price $69.99, paperback)

If one of your goals in life is to deploy and manage Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010 farms, here’s your book.

You definitely need it if you are already involved in configuring, customizing and supporting SharePoint and want to take the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) exam 70-667.

This “2-in-1 Self-Paced Training Kit” follows the successful formula used in many other Microsoft certification test preparation guides.

First, you work through a series of lessons and reviews covering each objective in the exam. Then you apply what you have learned to some real-world case scenarios, and you do some practice exercises. Finally, you plug in the CD that accompanies the book and try your hand at the practice tests.

“You can work through hundreds of questions using multiple testing modes to meet your specific learning needs,” Microsoft promises.

In other words, the material is there if you’re willing to push yourself to learn it. And there is a lot to learn when you work with SharePoint.

One small example: one of the book’s “Best Practices” entries points out that “[y]ou might imagine that the best practice to scale out a farm is simply to add more servers and to continue adding all services to each server. In fact, in larger and more complex environments[,] performance is optimized by dedicating servers to specific tasks.” And the entry briefly explains why.

Another short example: the book describes how “[a]fter you complete your SharePoint installation and the SharePoint Products Configuration Wizard, you often run the Initial Farm Configuration Wizard.” But then it explains why you should not use this tool to configure My Sites, “because the resulting configuration is not considered secure.”

Indeed, the co-authors add, that combination can set up a situation where, conceivably, a My Site owner could use scripting attacks “to get Farm Administrator privileges.”

The book has 821 pages and is divided into 12 chapters:

  1. Creating a SharePoint 2010 Intranet
  2. Administering and Automating SharePoint
  3. Managing Web Applications
  4. Administering and Securing SharePoint Content
  5. Service Applications and the Managed Metadata Service
  6. Configuring User Profiles and Social Networking
  7. Administering SharePoint Search
  8. Implementing Enterprise Service Applications
  9. Deploying and Upgrading to SharePoint 2010
  10. Administering SharePoint Customization
  11. Implementing Business Continuity
  12. Monitoring and Optimizing SharePoint Performance

As an added inducement to buy the book, it includes a discount voucher good for 15 percent off the price of one Microsoft Certification exam.

Again, Configuring Microsoft SharePoint 2010 is not a book for SharePoint beginners.

 The co-authors note: “The MCTS exam and this book assume that you have at least one year of experience configuring SharePoint and related technologies, including Internet Information Services (IIS), Windows Server 2008, Active Directory, DNS, SQL Server, and networking infrastructure services.”

The writers recommend using virtual machines to do the training exercises in their book. And they assume you will “use virtualization software that supports snapshots, so that you can roll back to a previous state after performing an exercise.”

They also give information and limitations on using multiple virtual machines on a single host. And their book providess download links to evaluation versions of the software needed to do the exercises.

The book’s accompanying CD offers one other learning convenience: an e-book version of the hefty text.

Si Dunn