Advanced Software Testing, Vol. 2, 2nd Edition – Study guide for ISTQB Advanced Test Manager – #bookreview

Advanced Software Testing, Volume 2, 2nd Edition

Guide to the ISTQB Advanced Certification as an Advanced Test Manager

Rex Black

(Rocky Nook – paperback)

 

Software testing is a complex and constantly evolving field. And having some well-recognized certifications is a good way to help encourage  your continued employability as a software tester and manager of software test teams.

Advanced Software Testing, Volume 2, 2nd Edition, focuses on showing you how to obtain an International Software Testing Qualifications Board (ISTQB) certification as an advanced test manager. The 519-page book is well-written and lays out what test managers should know to gain advanced skills in test estimation, test planning, test monitoring, and test control.

It also emphasizes  knowing how to define overall testing goals and strategies for the systems you and your team are testing. And it gives you strategies for preparing for and passing the 65-question Advanced Test Manager qualification test that is administered by ISTQB member boards and exam providers.

This second edition has been updated to reflect the ISTQB’s Advanced Test Manager 2012 Syllabus.  Advanced Software Testing, Volume 2, 2nd Edition takes a hands-on, exercise-rich approach, and it provides experience with essential how-tos for planning, scheduling, and tracking important tasks.

The updated book focuses on a variety of key processes that a software test manager must be able to handle, including describing and organizing the activities necessary to select, find and assign the right number of resources for testing tasks. You also must learn how to organize and lead testing teams, and how to manage the communications among testing teams’ members and between testing teams and all the other stakeholders. And you will need to know how to justify your testing decisions and report necessary information both to your superiors and members of your teams.

As for taking the complicated qualifications test, the author urges: “Don’t panic! Remember, the exam is meant to test your achievement of the learning objectives in the Advanced  Test Manager syllabus.” In other words, you cannot simply skim this book and take the exam. You must spend significant time on the learning exercises, sample questions and ISTQB glossary.

Si Dunn

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Get the book here: Advanced Software Testing, Volume 2, 2nd Edition

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Software Testing Foundations, 4th Edition – Updated study guide for Certified Tester Exam – #bookreview

Software Testing Foundations, 4th Edition

A Study Guide for the Certified Tester Exam

Andreas Spillner, Tilo Linz, Hans Schaefer

(Rocky Nook – paperback, Kindle

 

Worldwide, more than 300,000 software testers now have certifications recognized by the International Software Testing Qualifications Board (ISTQB).

“The ISTQB Certified Tester qualification scheme has three steps,” the authors note. “The basics are described in the Foundation Level curriculum (syllabus). Building on this is the Advanced Level certificate, showing a deeper knowledge of testing and evaluation. The third level, the Expert Level, is intended for experienced professional software testers and consists of several modules about different special topics.”

This newly updated study guide covers subjects on the Certified Tester Exam at the Foundation Level. The major topics are:

  • Fundamentals of Testing
  • Testing in the Software Life Cycle
  • Static Test
  • Dynamic Analysis – Test Design Techniques
  • Test Management

Appendices cover standardized test plans, offer exercises for each chapter that follow the introduction, and provide a glossary of terms, many of which are recognized by the ISTQB.

“Testing has no tradition for using standardized terminology,” the writers caution. “Thus, the test plan should contain an explanation of the testing terms used in the project. There is a high danger that different people will have different interpretations of testing terms. For example, just ask several people involved in the project for the definition of the term load testing.”

The three writers point out that “[t]he Certified Tester Foundation Level syllabus version 2011 forms the basis of this book . A few updates to the syllabus, which is due to be released in 2015, are noted in the book. The respective national boards may create and maintain additional national versions of the syllabus. These may contain minor deviations from the English original, such as, for example, references to local standards. The national boards coordinate and guarantee mutual compatibility of their curricula and exams. In this context, the responsible board is the International Software Testing Qualifications Board.”

Whether you plan to seek formal ISTQB certifications or just up your game as a software tester, Software Testing Foundations can be an excellent how-to guide. Many aspects of software testing–a complex and often underappreciated field–are covered. Overall, the book is well-organized and written clearly, and its illustrations, while somewhat sparse, are adequate to the task.

Si Dunn

 

Improving the Test Process – A Study Guide for ISTQB Expert Level Module – #software #bookreview

Improving the Test Process

Implementing Improvement and Change — A Study Guide for the ISTQB Expert Level Module

Graham Bath and Erik van Veenendaal
(Rocky Nook – paperback, Kindle)

If you are a software tester seeking an important new credential to help boost your career, definitely check out this book. Improving the Test Process can help you complete and pass one of the four modules required by the International Software Testing Qualifications Board (ISTQB) to achieve “Expert” certification. (Two of the four “Expert” modules will be available in 2014 and 2015, respectively.)

The ISTQB has established three levels in its Certified Tester program: Foundation, Advanced and Expert. “The result,” the two authors state, “is a structure that supports the development of career paths for professional testers.”

Improving the Test Process has 10 chapters and six appendices devoted to that Expert Level module, including an appendix that focuses on what to expect in the module’s certification exam.

The chapters and appendices are:

  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The Context of Improvement
  • 3. Model-Based Improvement
  • 4. Analytical-Based Improvement
  • 5. Selecting Improvement Approaches
  • 6. Process for Improvement
  • 7. Organization, Roles, and Skills
  • 8. Managing Change
  • 9. Critical Success Factors
  • 10. Adapting to Different Life Cycle Models
  • Appendix A: Glossary
  • Appendix B: Literature and References
  • Appendix C: The Syllabus Parts
  • Appendix D: The Exam
  • Appendix E: Summary of Cognitive Levels (K-Levels)
  • Appendix F: Answers

The “Answers” appendix provides the answers to exercises posted at the end of chapters 2 through 10.

“The definition of a testing expert used by ISTQB,” the authors note, “is ‘a person with the special skills and knowledge representing mastery of a particular testing subject. Being an expert means possessing and displaying special skills and knowledge derived from training and experience.'”

The book’s authors are both long-time professionals in the field of software testing, and they are co-authors of the ISTQB Expert Level syllabus. So they know their subject matter.

In each chapter, they lay out specific learning objectives and follow with technical content and exercises.

Their well-written book is structured so it can be used for two important purposes: (1) as a preparation guide for taking the ISTQB Expert Level certification exam and (2) as a practical guide for experienced testing professionals who want to learn more about how to improve software testing processes.

Si Dunn

Making Sense of NoSQL – A balanced, well-written overview – #bigdata #bookreview

Making Sense of NoSQL

A Guide for Managers and the Rest of Us
Dan McCreary and Ann Kelly
(Manning, paperback)

This is NOT a how-to guide for learning to use NoSQL software and build NoSQL databases. It is a meaty, well-structured overview aimed primarily at “technical managers, [software] architects, and developers.” However, it also is written to appeal to other, not-so-technical readers who are curious about NoSQL databases and where NoSQL could fit into the Big Data picture for their business, institution, or organization.

Making Sense of NoSQL definitely lives up to its subtitle: “A guide for managers and the rest of us.”

Many executives, managers, consultants and others today are dealing with expensive questions related to Big Data, primarily how it affects their current databases, database management systems, and the employees and contractors who maintain them. A variety of  problems can fall upon those who operate and update big relational (SQL) databases and their huge arrays of servers pieced together over years or decades.

The authors, Dan McCreary and Ann Kelly, are strong proponents, obviously, of the NoSQL approach. It offers, they note, “many ways to allow you to grow your database without ever having to shut down your servers.” However, they also realize that NoSQL may not a good, nor affordable, choice in many situations. Indeed, a blending of SQL and NoSQL systems may be a better choice. Or, making changes from SQL to NoSQL may not be financially feasible at all. So they have structured their book into four parts that attempt to help readers “objectively evaluate SQL and NoSQL database systems to see which business problems they solve.”

Part 1 provides an overview of NoSQL, its history, and its potential business benefits. Part 2 focuses on “database patterns,” including “legacy database patterns (which most solution architects are familiar with), NoSQL patterns, and native XML databases.” Part 3 examines “how NoSQL solutions solve the real-world business problems of big data, search, high availability, and agility.” And Part 4 looks at “two advanced topics associated with NoSQL: functional programming and system security.”

McCreary and Kelly observe that “[t]he transition to functional programming requires a paradigm shift away from software designed to control state and toward software that has a focus on independent data transformation.” (Erlang, Scala, and F# are some of the functional languages that they highlight.) And, they contend: “It’s no longer sufficient to design a system that will scale to 2, 4, or 8 core processors. You need to ask if your architecture will scale to 100, 1,000, or even 10,000 processors.”

Meanwhile, various security challenges can arise as a NoSQL database “becomes popular and is used by multiple projects” across “department trust boundaries.”

Computer science students, software developers, and others who are trying to stay knowledgeable about Big Data technology and issues should also consider reading this well-written book.

Si Dunn

Software Requirements, Third Edition – A major, long-needed update of a classic book – #software #business #bookreview

Software Requirements, Third Edition

Karl Wiegers and Joy Beatty
(Microsoft Press – paperback, Kindle)

A lot changes in 10 years, particularly in the world of software development. The previous edition of this book appeared in 2003, and I never knew about it while I struggled over software requirements documents and user manuals as a technical writer for several big and small companies.

In those days, pulling information out of software engineers was on par with pulling their wisdom teeth using needle-nosed pliers. And management seldom was helpful. Sometimes, I would be sitting at my desk, working on some project, and a high-level delegation suddenly would arrive.

“We are releasing a new software update tomorrow,” the delegation leader would announce. “And we need some documentation written. Here is the latest requirements document. We need for you to expand it into a release document. Oh, and some kind of user manual.”

Fortunately and unfortunately, the software release almost always slipped from tomorrow to the next week and then to the next month as bugs emerged during final testing. While the customer grumbled or screamed, I had time to produce new documents from the software requirements, plus interviews with any engineer I could grab and threaten to name in the materials that I would send out to customers.

It was all seat-of-the-pants stuff. Now, after retiring several years ago, I can only wish I had had this well-written “best practices” guide to creating, managing, and making best use of software requirements documents.

Software Requirements, Third Edition covers a lot of ground in its 637 (print-edition) pages. The 32 chapters are organized into five major parts:

  • Part I – Software Requirements: What, Why, and Who
  • Part II – Requirements Development
  • Part III – Requirements for Specific Project Classes
  • Part IV – Requirements Management
  • Part V – Implementing Requirements Engineering

The book’s two authors, each an expert in software requirements development, emphasize that a software requirements document can be a shining beacon of guidance and clarity or a confusing array of ill-defined features and functions–or it can be something that hovers perilously between good and bad.

The writers emphasize: “Many problems in the software world arise from shortcomings in the ways that people learn about, document, agree upon and modify the product’s requirements….[C]ommon problem areas are information gathering, implied functionality, miscommunicated assumptions, poorly specified requirements, and a casual change process. Various studies suggest that errors introduced during requirements activities account for 40 to 50 percent of all defects found in a software product….Inadequate user input and shortcomings in specifying and managing customer requirements are major contributors to unsuccessful projects. Despite this evidence,” they warn, “many organizations still practice ineffective requirements methods.”

Indeed, they add: “Nowhere more than in the requirements do the interests of all the stakeholders in a project intersect….These stakeholders include customers, users, business analysts, developers, and many others. Handled well, this intersection can lead to delighted customers and fulfilled developers. Handled poorly, it is the source of misunderstanding and friction that undermine the product’s quality and business value.”

The intended primary readership for the book includes “business analysts and requirements engineers, along with software architects, developers, project managers, and other stakeholders.”

In my view, Software Requirements, Third Edition should be read by an even bigger audience. This includes anyone who works in software development, anyone who manages software developers, anyone who sells software development services, plus other key personnel in companies that create, sell, or buy specialized or customized software products or services. The buyer must understand the software requirements process just as keenly as the seller. Otherwise, the software development company may try to hide behind certain jargon or definitions or introduce new processes or changes previously undefined as a delaying tactic, particularly if it has fallen behind schedule or otherwise is failing to deliver what it has promised.

A well-structured, well-worded, well-managed requirements document can help save time, money and, most importantly, the reputations of the companies and people on all sides of a software project. This important, newly updated book shows exactly how such documents can be created, managed, and maintained.

Si Dunn