‘Spring Boot in Action’ can help you push aside the old drudgeries of configuring Spring applications – #programming #bookreview

Spring in Action

Craig Walls

Manningpaperback

If you have worked with the decade-old Spring framework, you know well that it has a long history of providing configuration headaches for developers. The new Spring Boot framework, on the other hand, literally brings much-needed simplification and automation to the process of using Spring. And it can put some refreshing fun back into application development.

“Spring Boot,” Craig Walls states in his new book, “is an exciting new way to develop Spring applications with minimal friction from the framework itself. Auto-configuration eliminates much of the boilerplate configuration that infests traditional Spring applications. Spring Boot starters enable you to specify build dependencies by what they offer rather than use explicit library names and version. The Spring Boot CLI takes Spring Boot’s frictionless development model to a whole new level by enabling quick and easy development with Groovy from the command line. And the [Spring Boot] Actuator lets you look inside your running application to see what and how Spring Boot has done.”

You do not need a lot of Spring experience to benefit from this book. You do need some Java background, and it is helpful to have used Groovy, Gradle and Maven a few times. But the book’s text is written smoothly, and it is well illustrated, with numerous code examples and a few screen shoots. So Java developers who are fairly new likely can use it and pick up new skills.

While going through the book, you develop a reading-list application using Spring Initializr, Spring Boot, Spring Tool Suite, and other tools. In the project, you “use Spring MVC to handle web requests, Thymeleaf to define web views, and Spring Data JPA to persist the reading selections to a database,” Craig Walls explains. Initially, at least, “an embedded H2 database” is employed during development.

Walls’s book is divided into eight chapters:

1. Bootstarting Spring
2. Developing your first Spring Boot Application
3. Customizing configuration
4. Testing with Spring Boot
5. Getting Groovy with the Spring Boot CLI
6. Applying Grails in Spring Boot
7. Taking a peek inside the Actuator
8. Deploying Spring Boot applications

Four appendices also are presented: Spring Boot developer tools, Spring Boot starters, Configuration properties, and Spring Boot dependencies.

Bottom line: with Spring Boot providing much of the heavy lifting, you likely will gain better feelings about the venerable Spring framework. You may even wind up with a healthy new respect for it. And Spring Boot certainly should add more years to Spring’s usefulness and viability in the marketplace.

Si Dunn

Enterprise Application Development with Ext JS and Spring – (And a lot more!) – #programming #bookreview

Enterprise Application Development with Ext JS and Spring

Develop and deploy a high-performance Java web application using Ext JS and Spring

Gerald Gierer

(Packt Publishing paperback, Kindle)

A powerful JavaScript web framework such as Ext JS deserves a powerful platform for enterprise desktop application development. Gerald Gierer delivers a good one in his well-crafted new how-to book from Packt Publishing.

Gierer’s book is a bit unusual in today’s pare-it-down marketplace. It contains many before, during and after screen prints to illustrate the actions and outcomes of steps and commands. The 446-page book also has lengthy code listings that enable you to check and verify the outcomes of code changes you have made.

Ext JS and the Spring framework, however, are just a few of the packages that you work with as you set up your development tools and create, modify, expand, test and deploy a sample enterprise application (a task time tracker).

The other programs and tools include MySQL, the Java SE development kit (with the new Java API for JSON), NetBeans, Maven, Glassfish, and JUnit. And, with Ext JS, you learn to work with the Sencha Cmd tool and the Ext JS Software Development Kit (SDK).

But please note, particularly if you are new to some of this : You must pay careful attention to each paragraph as you load and configure software and as you keep building and enhancing your enterprise application.

In this book, it is easy start jumping from one screen print to the next, or from one code listing to the next, while skipping the intervening text. When you do, you can miss key steps that sometimes are buried without highlights in the wording.

This was my first time to work with some of the required software packages, so I had to force myself to really slow down and pay close attention to each paragraph, as well as each graphic.  My initial development attempt went off the rails when I discovered, more than 100 pages into the book, that I had misconfigured a couple of tables, skipped a couple of data changes, and generally screwed up the database. And, being new to some of the software, I couldn’t figure out to repair everything. So I simply started over from scratch and this time moved carefully from one page to the next, closely checking code entries and the book’s text before clicking “Enter.” That made all the difference in my results.

If you are looking to do enterprise application development with a JavaScript framework, definitely consider Ext JS and definitely consider Gerald Gierer’s fine Enterprise Application Development with Ext JS and Spring.

And definitely take your time as you work your way through his book.

Si Dunn