‘Spring Boot in Action’ can help you push aside the old drudgeries of configuring Spring applications – #programming #bookreview

Spring in Action

Craig Walls

Manningpaperback

If you have worked with the decade-old Spring framework, you know well that it has a long history of providing configuration headaches for developers. The new Spring Boot framework, on the other hand, literally brings much-needed simplification and automation to the process of using Spring. And it can put some refreshing fun back into application development.

“Spring Boot,” Craig Walls states in his new book, “is an exciting new way to develop Spring applications with minimal friction from the framework itself. Auto-configuration eliminates much of the boilerplate configuration that infests traditional Spring applications. Spring Boot starters enable you to specify build dependencies by what they offer rather than use explicit library names and version. The Spring Boot CLI takes Spring Boot’s frictionless development model to a whole new level by enabling quick and easy development with Groovy from the command line. And the [Spring Boot] Actuator lets you look inside your running application to see what and how Spring Boot has done.”

You do not need a lot of Spring experience to benefit from this book. You do need some Java background, and it is helpful to have used Groovy, Gradle and Maven a few times. But the book’s text is written smoothly, and it is well illustrated, with numerous code examples and a few screen shoots. So Java developers who are fairly new likely can use it and pick up new skills.

While going through the book, you develop a reading-list application using Spring Initializr, Spring Boot, Spring Tool Suite, and other tools. In the project, you “use Spring MVC to handle web requests, Thymeleaf to define web views, and Spring Data JPA to persist the reading selections to a database,” Craig Walls explains. Initially, at least, “an embedded H2 database” is employed during development.

Walls’s book is divided into eight chapters:

1. Bootstarting Spring
2. Developing your first Spring Boot Application
3. Customizing configuration
4. Testing with Spring Boot
5. Getting Groovy with the Spring Boot CLI
6. Applying Grails in Spring Boot
7. Taking a peek inside the Actuator
8. Deploying Spring Boot applications

Four appendices also are presented: Spring Boot developer tools, Spring Boot starters, Configuration properties, and Spring Boot dependencies.

Bottom line: with Spring Boot providing much of the heavy lifting, you likely will gain better feelings about the venerable Spring framework. You may even wind up with a healthy new respect for it. And Spring Boot certainly should add more years to Spring’s usefulness and viability in the marketplace.

Si Dunn

Book Brief – Programming Grails – A new, solid guide for experienced developers – #programming #bookreview

Programming Grails
Burt Beckwith
(O’Reilly – paperback, Kindle )

Burt Beckwith is an experienced core developer on the Grails software team at SpringSource. His new book, Programming Grails, is written primarily for experienced Grails developers “who want to dig deeper into the architecture and understand more about how Grails works its magic and how it integrates with Groovy, Spring, Hibernate, and other technologies.”

Beckwith adds that “[d]evelopers with experience in similar frameworks such as Spring MVC, JEE, or Ruby on Rails should find this book useful in understanding how Grails implements features to which they are accustomed.”

He cautions that Programming Grails “should not be your first Grails book, since it presumes a good deal of previous experience and understanding, so be sure to read a more comprehensive Grails book first.”

The 12-chapter, 344-page book focuses on the inner workings of the Grails 2.0 feature set and emphasizes “best practices for building and deploying Grails applications,” including topics such as “performance, security, scaling, tuning, debugging, and monitoring.” It is written clearly, and its text is kept reasonably short between topic headings. Numerous short code samples and other illustrations are included.

Grails’ creator, Graeme Rocher, has given this book a solid thumb’s up, stating that “it goes much deeper than any other Grails book I have seen.”