CompTIA Security+ Exam SY0-301 Rapid Review – For Security+ certification – #bookreview

CompTIA Security+ Exam SY0-301 Rapid Review
Michael Gregg
(Microsoft Press – paperback, Kindle)

IT security professionals know the importance of certifications to their careers and their continuing credibility with employers or potential clients.

The CompTIA Security+ Exam SY0-301 Rapid Review is a handy and helpful guide for IT security specialists who are preparing for Exam SY0-301, to earn a CompTIA vendor-neutral Security+ certification

Important note: This book is for certification candidates who are already well-versed in their field. It is specifically “designed to assess your readiness for the SY-301 exam,” the author notes. “It is not designed as a comprehensive exam preparation guide.”

If you want to begin studying for Exam SY0-301, you are urged to start with the CompTIA Security+ Training Kit, which is scheduled for release in 2013.

The Rapid Review and the SY0-301 exam are aimed at IT professionals who have “a minimum of two years of experience in IT administration with a focus on security.”

Also, exam candidates should have “[d]ay-to-day technical information security experience” and “[b]road knowledge of security concerns and implementation.”

Like the exam, the Rapid Review focuses on six areas: (1) network security; (2) compliance and operational security; (3) threats and vulnerabilities; (4) application, data and host security; (5) access control and identity management; and (6) cryptography.

Along with definitions and explanations, the Rapid Review challenges the reader with numerous true-false questions and “Can you answer these questions?” queries. The true-false answers and their explanations are presented immediately after the true-false questions. Meanwhile, the answers to the “Can you answer these questions?” queries are presented at the end of each chapter—and you have to do a bit more work and reviewing to sort them out.

Si Dunn

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Juniper MX Series – A comprehensive guide for network engineers – #bookreview #juniper #networking

Juniper MX Series
Douglas Richard Hanks Jr., and Harry Reynolds
(O’Reilly, paperbackKindle)

This comprehensive, well-written handbook is aimed directly at network engineers who want to know more about the feature-rich Juniper MX Series of routers.

Actually, “handbook” is a bit of a misnomer. It takes two hands to comfortably handle this hefty, comprehensive, 864-page guide.

The two authors, both network engineers themselves, note that the Juniper MX Series is “[o]ne of the most popular routers in the enterprise and service provider market….”

They add: “The Juniper MX was designed to be a network virtualization beast. You can virtualize the physical interfaces, logical interfaces, data plane, network services, and even have virtualized services span several Juniper MX routers. What traditionally was done with an entire army of routers can now be consolidated and virtualized into a single Juniper MX router.”

The book’s chapters are:

  • 1.      Juniper MX Architecture
  • 2.      Bridging, VLAN Mapping, IRB, and Virtual Switches
  • 3.      Stateless Filters, Hierarchical Policing, and Tri-Color Marking
  • 4.      Routing Engine Protection and DDOS Prevention
  • 5.      Trio Class of Service
  • 6.      MX Virtual Chassis
  • 7.      Trio Inline Services
  • 8.      Multi-Chassis Link Aggregation
  • 9.      Junos High Availability on MX Routers

The chapters, organized by feature sets, include review questions (with answers conveniently located nearby), so you can track your learning progress.

The authors have extensive experience with the Juniper MX router series. Douglas Richard Hanks Jr., is a data center architect with Juniper Networks. Harry Reynolds has more than 30 years’ experience in networking, with a focus on LANs and LAN interconnection.

Si Dunn

For more information: (paperbackKindle)

Deploying Rails – A good how-to guide covering choices, tools & best practices – #programming #bookreview

Deploying Rails: Automate, Deploy, Scale, Maintain, and Sleep at Night
Anthony Burns and Tom Copeland (Pragmatic Bookshelf, paperback)

Maybe you have been studying Ruby and Rails and now feel ready for the next big step. Perhaps you are already on a job where a Rails application needs to be deployed and running on a server ASAP. Or, maybe you manage a team that must deploy and support a Rails app, and you want to understand more of what they actually must accomplish to get the app up and running – and keep it running.

Deploying Rails is a very good guide to the decisions that must be made and to the tools and best practices essential for success. The two writers are both professional Rails developers with strong backgrounds.

Their 217-page book, they note, “is “centered around an example social networking application called MassiveApp. While MassiveApp may not have taken the world by storm just yet, we’re confident that it’s going to be a winner, and we want to build a great environment in which MassiveApp can grow and flourish. This book will take us through that journey.”

That “journey” is organized into 10 chapters and two appendices, all well written and illustrated with code examples.

  • Chapter 1: Introduction – (including choosing a hosting location)
  • Chapter 2: Getting Started with Vagrant – (setting up and managing a virtual server and virtual machines)
  • Chapter 3: Rails on Puppet – (“arguably the most popular open source server provisioning tool.…”)
  • Chapter 4: Basic Capistrano – (“the premier Rails deployment utility….”)
  • Chapter 5: Advanced Capistrano – (deals with making deployments faster and also easier when “deploying to multiple environments.”)
  • Chapter 6: Monitoring with Naigos – (monitoring principles and how to apply them to Rails apps. Also, how to perform several types of checks.)
  • Chapter 7: Collecting Metrics with Ganglia – (how to gather a Rails app’s important metrics from an infrastructure level and an application level.)
  • Chapter 8: Maintaining the Application – (how to handle “the ongoing care and feeding of a production Rails application.”)
  • Chapter 9: Running Rubies with RVM – (using the Ruby enVironmental Manager [RVM] in development and deployment.)
  • Chapter 10: Special Topics – (“We’ll sweep through the Rails technology stack starting at the application level and proceed downward to the operating system, hitting on various interesting ideas as we go.”)

The two appendices cover (1) “a line-by-line review of a Capistrano deployment file” and (2) “deploying MassiveApp to an alternative technology stack consisting of nginx and Unicorn.”

A key focus of the book is building a set of configuration files and keeping the latest versions stored in Git, so deployment of a new or updated app can go smoother.

Deploying a Rails app involves making many different choices, and the process can go wrong quite easily if not set up properly.

“The most elegant Rails application,” the authors caution, “can be crippled by runtime environment issues that make adding new servers an adventure, unexpected downtime a regularity, scaling a difficult task, and frustration a constant.

“Good tools do exist for deploying, running, monitoring, and measuring Rails applications, but pulling them together into a coherent whole is no small effort.”

Deploying Rails can significantly ease the complicated process of getting a new Rails application running on a server. Equally important, Rails experts Anthony Burns and Tom Copeland can show you how to keep the app running smoothly and configured for growth as it gains users, functionality, and popularity.

Si Dunn

Understanding IPv6, 3rd Edition – Welcome to the new, improved & BIGGER Internet – #bookreview #microsoft #windows

Understanding IPv6, 3rd Edition
Joseph Davies
(Microsoft Press, paperback, list price $49.99; Kindle edition, list price $39.99)

The Internet can now expand into a much bigger realm than was possible before the worldwide launch of IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6) on June 6, 2012.

The web most of us use has long relied on IPv4, the circa-1981 Internet Protocol built around 32-bit addresses. This scheme can accommodate approximately 4.3 billion unique addresses worldwide. On a planet where (1) the population now has surpassed 7 billion and (2) many of us now have multiple devices connected to the Web, Internet Protocol version 4 recently has been in dire danger of running out of unique addresses.

IPv6 will fix that problem and offer several important new enhancements, as long as we don’t find ways to expand the Internet to parallel universes or to the people on a few trillion distant planets. IPv6 uses a 128-bit addressing scheme that can accommodate more than 340 trillion trillion trillion unique addresses. So go ahead. Get online with that second iPad, third smart phone or fourth laptop.

IPv4 and IPv6 are now running in a dual stack that supports both addressing schemes. The transition from IPv4 to IPv6 is not seamless, however. A lot of work remains to be done by major Internet service providers (ISPs), web companies, hardware manufacturers, network equipment providers and many others to enable IPv6 on their products and services.

Joseph Davies, author of Understanding IPv6, has been writing about IPv6 since 1999. His new 674-page third edition provides both a detailed overview of IPv6 and a detailed focus on how to implement it, within a limited range of Windows products.

“There are,” he notes, “different versions of the Microsoft IPv6 protocol for Windows….I have chosen to confine the discussion to the IPv6 implementation in Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2008, Windows 8, Windows 7, and Windows Vista.”

This well-written and well-organized book is not for beginners. Its intended audience includes:

  • Windows networking consultants and planners
  • Microsoft Windows network administrators
  • Microsoft Certified Systems Engineers (MCSEs) and Microsoft Certified Trainers (MCTs)
  • General technical staff
  • Information technology students

Davies and Microsoft offer downloadable companion content for this book: Microsoft Network Monitor 3.4 (a network sniffer for capturing and viewing frames); and PowerPoint 2007 training slides that can be used along with the book to teach IPv6.

If you need a guide to best practices for using IPv6 in a Windows network, definitely consider getting Understanding IPv6, 3rd Edition.

Si Dunn

Introducing Windows Server 2012 – A guide to what’s coming in a much-anticipated release – #bookreview #microsoft

Introducing Windows Server® 2012
Mitch Tulloch with the Microsoft Server Team
(Microsoft Press, paperback, list price $14.99; Kindle edition,
list price $0.00)

 The anticipated release date for the new version of Microsoft Server®  is sometime between the third quarter of 2012 and early 2013. And this book’s introduction hails it as “probably the most significant release of the Windows Server platform ever.”

Windows Server® 2012, it states, will offer “an innovative new user interface, powerful new management tools, enhanced Windows PowerShell support, and hundreds of new features in the areas of networking, storage and virtualization.”

There also will be major emphasis on cloud computing. The product has been “designed for the cloud from the ground up and provides a foundation for building both public and private cloud solutions,” the book declares.

Introducing Windows Server® 2012 is “based on beta,” according to the cover disclaimer. And, according to the author, the book  “represents a ‘first look’ based on the public beta release of Windows Server 2012 and is intended to help IT professionals familiarize themselves with the capabilities of the new platform.”

The 235-page book is divided into five chapters:

  • Chapter 1 presents “The business need for Windows Server® 2012.” Not surprisingly, the main focus is on cloud computing and multi-server platforms.
  • Chapter 2’s focus is “Foundation for building your private cloud” and how the new product can provide “a solid foundation for building dynamic, highly scalable, multi-tenant cloud environments.”
  • Chapter 3 looks at the Windows Server® 2012 features and capabilities that can create a “[h]ighly available, easy-to-manage multi-server platform.”
  • Chapter 4 discusses how you can use the product to “[d]eploy web applications on premises and in the cloud,” with its “scalable and elastic web platform” and “[s]upport for open standards.”
  • Chapter 5 focuses on Windows Server® 2012 features and capabilities that are key to “[e]nabling the modern workstyle.” The author states: “Today’s business users want things simple. They want to be able to access their desktop applications, and data virtually anywhere, from any device, and have the full Windows experience. And from an IT perspective, this must be done securely and in ways that can ensure compliance at all times.”

Since this book is a “first look” written prior to the ready-to-manufacture (RTM) date, some of its screenshots, feature descriptions and stated capabilities may differ somewhat from the product that will be released.

But this overview can be a useful – and inexpensive — guide to have handy while considering whether to move to, or upgrade to, Windows Server® 2012.

Si Dunn

Hadoop: The Definitive Guide, Third Edition – Big Tools for Big Data – #programming #bookreview

Hadoop: The Definitive Guide, Third Edition
Tom White
(O’Reilly, paperback, list price $49.99; Kindle edition, list price, $39.99)

“The good news is that Big Data is here,” Tom White writes in this revised and updated third edition to Hadoop’s “definitive guide.” But: “The bad news is that we are struggling to store and analyze it.”

Indeed, Big Data is now being measured in zettabytes, which is “equivalently one thousand exabytes, one million petabytes, or one billion terabytes,” White says. And all of us are creating, storing and trying to benefit from expanding amounts of data each day.

Enter Hadoop, “a reliable shared storage and analysis system. The storage is provided by HDFS [the Hadoop Distributed File System] and the analysis by MapReduce. There are other parts to Hadoop,” White emphasizes, “but these capabilities are its kernel.”

Hadoop (it’s not an acronym; simply the name of a child’s toy elephant) is a complex programming language. But, White says: “Stripped to its core, the tools that Hadoop provides for building distributed systems—for data storage, data analysis, and coordination—are simple. If there’s a common theme, it’s about raising the level of abstraction—to create building blocks for programmers who just happen to have lots of data to store, or lots of data to analyze, or lots of machines to coordinate, and who don’t have the time , the skill, or the inclination to become distributed systems experts to build the infrastructure to handle it.”

This new edition covers recent changes and additions to Hadoop, including the MapReduce API and new MapReduce 2 runtime, “which is built on a new distributed resource management system called YARN.” Several chapters related to MapReduce and other topics also have been added or expanded.

Hadoop can run MapReduce programs written in a variety of languages, including Java, Ruby, Python, and C++. And: “MapReduce programs are inherently parallel, thus putting very large-scare data analysis into the hands of anyone with enough machines at her disposal.” Hadoop, meanwhile, provides powerful parallel processing capabilities.

Hadoop increasingly is being employed by companies and organizations that must deal with processing, analyzing, and storing very large amounts of data. White’s book includes some case studies that explain Hadoop’s role in solving several Big Data challenges.

Hadoop: The Definitive Guide, Third Edition is not a beginner’s how-to book. But it’s definitely recommended for “programmers looking to analyze datasets of any size, and for administrators who want to set up and run Hadoop clusters.”

Si Dunn

Take Control of Your 802.11n AirPort Network, 3rd. Ed. – Has info for new AirPort Utility 6 – #Apple #bookreview

Take Control of Your 802.11n AirPort Network, Third Edition
Glenn Fleishman
(TidBITS Publishing, Inc., ebook [ePub, Mobi, PDF], $20.00)

Attention users of Apple’s 802.11n gear in Wi-Fi networking. TidBITS Publishing recently has released a new edition of Take Control of your 802.11n Airport Network.

Its author points out: “If you’re setting up, extending, or retooling a Wi-Fi network with one or more 802.11n base stations from Apple— including the AirPort Extreme, AirPort Express, or Time Capsule— using AirPort Utility 6 on the Mac or AirPort Utility in iOS, this book will help you get the fastest network with the least equipment and fewest roadblocks. This book also has advice on connecting to a Wi-Fi network from older versions of Mac OS X and Windows 7.”

If you are still using AirPort Utility 5, pay attention.

“This third edition,” TidBITS notes, “has a significant change: it replaces its former coverage of AirPort Utility 5 in favor of focusing on AirPort Utility 6, which was released in February 2012. AirPort Utility 6 runs on 10.7 Lion or later. AirPort Utility 6 has many of the features that are documented in previous editions of this book, but it omits several options designed for mixed 802.11g and 80211.n networks and it can’t configure 802.11b and 802.11g AirPort base station models (any base station released from 1999 to 2006). Also, it supports only iCloud, not MobileMe, for remote connections.”

If you are caught in the middle and need to support both AirPort Utility 5 and AirPort Utility 6, purchasers of this ebook are given a link where they can refer to the previous edition, at no extra charge.

Says Fleishman, “The big new feature in AirPort Utility 6 is a graphical depiction of the layout of an AirPort network. This is terrific for visualizing how parts are connected and seeing where errors lie. This third edition also discusses AirPort Utility for iOS, which has a similar approach to AirPort Utility 6, and makes it possible to configure and manage an Apple base station without a desktop computer. That’s a first for Apple.”

The book is well-written, with text presented in short paragraphs for easier viewing on portable devices.

Take Control of Your 802.11n AirPort Network, Third Edition also offers a good number of uncomplicated illustrations, screenshots, tips, warnings, and lists of steps.

— Si Dunn