Software Testing Foundations, 4th Edition – Updated study guide for Certified Tester Exam – #bookreview

Software Testing Foundations, 4th Edition

A Study Guide for the Certified Tester Exam

Andreas Spillner, Tilo Linz, Hans Schaefer

(Rocky Nook – paperback, Kindle

 

Worldwide, more than 300,000 software testers now have certifications recognized by the International Software Testing Qualifications Board (ISTQB).

“The ISTQB Certified Tester qualification scheme has three steps,” the authors note. “The basics are described in the Foundation Level curriculum (syllabus). Building on this is the Advanced Level certificate, showing a deeper knowledge of testing and evaluation. The third level, the Expert Level, is intended for experienced professional software testers and consists of several modules about different special topics.”

This newly updated study guide covers subjects on the Certified Tester Exam at the Foundation Level. The major topics are:

  • Fundamentals of Testing
  • Testing in the Software Life Cycle
  • Static Test
  • Dynamic Analysis – Test Design Techniques
  • Test Management

Appendices cover standardized test plans, offer exercises for each chapter that follow the introduction, and provide a glossary of terms, many of which are recognized by the ISTQB.

“Testing has no tradition for using standardized terminology,” the writers caution. “Thus, the test plan should contain an explanation of the testing terms used in the project. There is a high danger that different people will have different interpretations of testing terms. For example, just ask several people involved in the project for the definition of the term load testing.”

The three writers point out that “[t]he Certified Tester Foundation Level syllabus version 2011 forms the basis of this book . A few updates to the syllabus, which is due to be released in 2015, are noted in the book. The respective national boards may create and maintain additional national versions of the syllabus. These may contain minor deviations from the English original, such as, for example, references to local standards. The national boards coordinate and guarantee mutual compatibility of their curricula and exams. In this context, the responsible board is the International Software Testing Qualifications Board.”

Whether you plan to seek formal ISTQB certifications or just up your game as a software tester, Software Testing Foundations can be an excellent how-to guide. Many aspects of software testing–a complex and often underappreciated field–are covered. Overall, the book is well-organized and written clearly, and its illustrations, while somewhat sparse, are adequate to the task.

Si Dunn

 

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Microsoft Manual of Style (4th Ed.) – Improve your technical communications – #bookreview

Microsoft Manual of Style
Microsoft Corp.
(Microsoft Press, paperback, list price $29.99; Kindle edition, list price $23.99)

Good writers know they need more help than they can find in a dictionary and a thesaurus. So they often have collections of reference books that include such works as the Chicago Manual of Style, the MLA Handbook and the Associated Press Stylebook.

Consider adding one more specialized stylebook to your collection, particularly if you: (1) you write about, or teach, computer technology; (2) if you are a technical writer assigned to create product manuals for software or hardware; or (3) if you work as an editor of technical articles and technical books.

Microsoft Press recently has released the 4th edition of its Microsoft Manual of Style. This updated edition “includes guidelines for wired and global audience, cloud computing, publication on devices, social media, search engine optimization (SEO), and the natural user interface (NUI).”

The Microsoft Manual of Style is a well-structured and useful guide that can help you improve the clarity, accuracy and style consistency of your technology writing and editing.

The book also offers useful guidelines for global English syntax and machine translation syntax. And its glossary defines more than one thousand terms and acronyms.

These are, of course, times of very rapid change for technology and its terminology. So this latest printed edition of the style manual is, “by necessity, a snapshot” and “by nature a work in progress,” its editors concede.

They emphasize how examples in the book “are labeled as ‘Microsoft Style’ and ‘Not Microsoft Style’ rather than as ‘Correct’ and ‘Incorrect.’ We don’t want to presume to say that the Microsoft way is the only correct way. It’s simply the guidance that we follow in our workplace. In sharing it with others, we hope that the decisions we have made for our content professionals will help you in your own efforts to promote consistency, clarity, and accuracy.”

They have tried to include “as many relevant neologisms as possible” – new words and phrases or new meanings for old terms, recently pushed to the fore by new technology. For example, “[g]esture guidelines for the natural user interface (NUI) introduce what have been non-technical words such as flick, pinch, and tap into the realm of technical documentation.”

A minor ding: the book’s index and usage guides both seem slightly incomplete. For example, in the Introduction, the editors state: “In the world of cloud computing, we now include terabyte (TB), petabyte (PB), and on up to yottabyte (YB), or 1024.” Yet, only terabyte and TB show up in the index and usage guide. PB and YB seem to be missing in action in both areas.

Also, the book spends two pages (16 and 17) explaining (beneath a “Parallelism” heading) how parallelism is used in Microsoft instructional manuals. “Parallelism is ensuring that elements of sentences that are similar in purpose are also similar in structure.” Yet, “parallelism” is not in the index. The term “parallel structure” appears in its place, instead.

These small glitches are not deal breakers. They simply highlight what was stated earlier, that a stylebook is a work always in progress. (Perhaps the fixes will be added in edition five?)

This 4th edition of the Microsoft Manual of Style is rich with information, examples, guidance and definitions. If you write or edit computer-related technology materials, you need it on your reference shelf.

Si Dunn‘s latest book is a detective novel, Erwin’s Law. His other published works include Jump, a novella, and a book of poetry, plus several short stories, including The 7th Mars Cavalry, all available on Kindle. He is a screenwriter, a freelance book reviewer and a former technical writer and software/hardware QA test specialist.