Will “Smart” Device Dependence Make You Increasingly Dumb?

I strolled into my favorite Austin Starbucks recently and noticed a startling sight. Every person standing in line or sitting at tables simultaneously had their head down as if in group prayer. All at the same moment were staring at their smartphones.

I pulled out my own phone, dramatically flipped it open, held it aloft, and waved it in silent protest. No one got the joke, because no one noticed.

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We’ve all seen people become panic-stricken and helpless when they realize they have lost or forgotten their “smart” device, or had it stolen. “Everything—my whole life—is on there!” one friend wailed recently. “All my pictures, my personal information, my contacts. And—oh, god–work emails! I don’t know what to do!” She kept frantically digging through her big purse, which also contained “everything,” including papers from work, so she could keep working at home after she got off work. When I called her phone from my phone, we found her “smart” phone buried deep beneath makeup containers and assorted other purse rubble.

Many people now use their smartphones for “everything,” from paying a restaurant check (after using the calculator function to split it and calculate the tip) to hailing an Uber ride and remotely controlling their home air conditioning. And, anytime a question is raised in a group, several people will circumvent natural debate or brainstorming by immediately going to Google and reading off some article titles and paragraphs.

Meanwhile, a few unrelated videos also will pop up and be shared:  Cat attacks python! Man sets shoes on fire by standing on hot coals! Ha-ha-ha!

The smartphone video distractions are only going to get worse. As AT&T’s CEO, Randall Stephenson recently told Fortune magazine: “…mobile video…is the real deal,” adding: “Half our mobile network traffic is video now, and it’s really growing fast.”

So, recent statutes banning talking or texting on a digital device while driving are now far behind the curve of progress. (“Sorry, officer, I was not breaking the law. I was watching Game of Thrones while paying no attention to the traffic and scenery around me.”)

Perhaps it is time to ask yourself two serious questions. Are you losing touch with the real world as you become increasingly distracted by your smartphone? And will your growing dependence on its “smart”-ness make you correspondingly “dumb” over time?

Si Dunn

Take Control of Your 802.11n AirPort Network, 3rd. Ed. – Has info for new AirPort Utility 6 – #Apple #bookreview

Take Control of Your 802.11n AirPort Network, Third Edition
Glenn Fleishman
(TidBITS Publishing, Inc., ebook [ePub, Mobi, PDF], $20.00)

Attention users of Apple’s 802.11n gear in Wi-Fi networking. TidBITS Publishing recently has released a new edition of Take Control of your 802.11n Airport Network.

Its author points out: “If you’re setting up, extending, or retooling a Wi-Fi network with one or more 802.11n base stations from Apple— including the AirPort Extreme, AirPort Express, or Time Capsule— using AirPort Utility 6 on the Mac or AirPort Utility in iOS, this book will help you get the fastest network with the least equipment and fewest roadblocks. This book also has advice on connecting to a Wi-Fi network from older versions of Mac OS X and Windows 7.”

If you are still using AirPort Utility 5, pay attention.

“This third edition,” TidBITS notes, “has a significant change: it replaces its former coverage of AirPort Utility 5 in favor of focusing on AirPort Utility 6, which was released in February 2012. AirPort Utility 6 runs on 10.7 Lion or later. AirPort Utility 6 has many of the features that are documented in previous editions of this book, but it omits several options designed for mixed 802.11g and 80211.n networks and it can’t configure 802.11b and 802.11g AirPort base station models (any base station released from 1999 to 2006). Also, it supports only iCloud, not MobileMe, for remote connections.”

If you are caught in the middle and need to support both AirPort Utility 5 and AirPort Utility 6, purchasers of this ebook are given a link where they can refer to the previous edition, at no extra charge.

Says Fleishman, “The big new feature in AirPort Utility 6 is a graphical depiction of the layout of an AirPort network. This is terrific for visualizing how parts are connected and seeing where errors lie. This third edition also discusses AirPort Utility for iOS, which has a similar approach to AirPort Utility 6, and makes it possible to configure and manage an Apple base station without a desktop computer. That’s a first for Apple.”

The book is well-written, with text presented in short paragraphs for easier viewing on portable devices.

Take Control of Your 802.11n AirPort Network, Third Edition also offers a good number of uncomplicated illustrations, screenshots, tips, warnings, and lists of steps.

— Si Dunn