Adobe Edge Animate – Rocky Nook’s elegant new software how-to guide – #webdesign #bookreview

adobe_edge_animate

Adobe Edge Animate

Using Web Standards to Create Interactive Websites

Simon Widjaja
(Rocky Nook – paperback, Kindle)

Simon Widjaja’s new book is both elegant and practical. It is elegantly structured and illustrated, and it is practical in its approach to showing how to use Adobe Edge Animate.

That software package, Widjaja says, “is a multimedia authoring tool based on open web standards….Compositions created with Edge Animate can be used in browser applications and apps on mobile devices, but also in digital publications created with Adobe Digital Publishing Suite or Apple iBooks Author.”

Widjaja is an experienced Edge developer, as well as programmer, author, IT trainer, and Flash developer.

Not only does his book show how to design and create animations. He also demonstrates “solutions that go beyond the application’s standard functions,” including “integration into external systems and extensibility with additional frameworks and custom components.”

The Edge Animate runtime, he notes, “is largely based on the popular jQuery JavaScript framework.” So external HTML and JavaScript components can be placed into Edge Animate compositions, and Edge Animate users can create their own components.

The 220-page book (translated from German by Susan Spies) is divided into seven chapters, with numbered subheadings and sub-subheadings. The chapters are:

Chapter 1: Introduction — Contains “basic information on the current status quo in web standards” and how they apply to understanding and using Edge Animate.

Chapter 2: Getting to know the authoring tool – Provides an overview of Edge Animate’s interface and its wide range of functions.

Chapter 3: Design – Shows how to use the functions for creating graphic elements, how to work with assets such as images and fonts, and how to “create more complex layouts.”

Chapter 4: Animation – Introduces the Timeline and the Pin and explains “how to animate  your compositions using keyframes.”

Chapter 5: Interaction – Focuses on Edge Animate’s API and “how to implement various actions.”

Chapter 6: Publication –Explores the “the various publishing options available…in Edge Animate and explains the necessary preparations…for publishing your composition on the web or within a digital publication. Also looks at “how your creative work can be integrated into a content management system.”

Chapter 7: Advanced Tips – Covers “a range of extensions you will need to make your projects perform well on the web.”

Widjaja’s Adobe Edge Animate seems an excellent fit for Rocky Nook’s stated 2014 mission, which is “to publish books on cutting-edge developments in photography, imaging, and technology that really matter, and to focus on practical usage that will enhance capabilities. Our ultimate goal,” the company says, “is to foster image quality.”

With this book and Adobe Edge Animate, you definitely can learn how to boost the quality of images, using effective animated presentations on the web, in apps, and in other publications.

One e-book caution: This book “has complex layouts and has been optimized for reading on devices with larger screens.” In other words, do not try to read it on a phone or small tablet.

Si Dunn

WebGL: Up and Running – 3D Web graphics for the beginner, with expert guidance – #bookreview

WebGL: Up and Running
Tony Parisi
(O’Reilly,
paperbackKindle)

“WebGL,” Tony Parisi notes, “brings 3D to the browser, providing a JavaScript interface to the graphics hardware on your machine.”

Parisi is co-creator of the VRML and X3D languages which have become ISO standards for networked 3D graphics. So he knows a bit about using WebGL (Web Graphics Library) for low-level 3D renderings on the Web. If you are ready to give Web 3D graphics a try, you need WebGL: Up and Running.

Parisi’s new book is a well-written “quick introduction” to 3D programming. It has 211 pages and numerous code examples and screen shots. And it is organized into eight chapters and an appendix that provides links to several WebGL resources.

The first two chapters offer an overview of the WebGL API and Three.js, the open source JavaScript library that is used in the programming examples.

Chapters 3 through 6 focus on “the details of programming graphics, animation, and interaction” and explore “WebGL’s breakthrough capabilities for integrating 2D and 3D into a seamless user experience.”

Chapters 7 and 8 look at “real-world WebGL production topics, from authoring tools and file formats to building robust and secure WebGL applications.” Also in`Chapter 8, Parisi shows how to build a full WegGL application, a racing game.

You will need some familiarity with HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery and Ajax to use this book. But you won’t need prior 3D graphics experience. The author’s goal is to get you up and running well enough that you can start using WebGL and learning as you go.

Still, “even the 3D graphics expert will learn something new” from this how-to guide, promises Ken Russell, the Khronos Group’s WebGL Working Group chair, in the Foreword to WebGL: Up and Running.

Si Dunn