Programming iOS 6, 3rd Edition – In with the New, Out with the Old (iOS 5 & Earlier) – #bookreview

Programming iOS 6, 3rd Edition
Matt Neuburg
(O’Reilly – paperback, Kindle)

“My book is way bigger than your book.”

Matt Neuburg, author of Programming iOS 6, could make that claim and win almost any book-size contest. The recently published 3rd Edition of his well-respected how-to guide focuses on the “Fundamentals of iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch Development” and now spans 1,154 pages in its paperback edition. It’s definitely much thicker and heavier than any of the devices it covers.

This new edition is centered on iOS 6.1 and xCode 4.6. The author notes that he has “eliminated most references to previous iOS versions.” And he explains: “Many iOS 6 features, of course, do not exist in iOS 5 or before; I usually mention that a new feature is new, but I have not generally addressed the problem of writing backwards-compatible code. The text would become confused and bloated if everything had to be qualified with advice for different versions (‘but if you’re targeting iOS 5.1, do this; if you’re targeting iOS 5.0, do that; if you’re targeting iOS 4.3, do the other’). I believe that I can justify such omissions on the grounds that previous editions of this book exist!”

Indeed they do. Programming iOS 5, which was published in two editions, also covers iOS 4.3 and is available on Amazon.com and through other sources..

“New iOS 6 features are, of course, both explained and adopted” in the new 3rd edition, Neuburg says. “For example, having described NSArray subscripting (in Chapter 10), I then use it consistently, in place of objectAtIndex:, throughout the rest of the book. Aside from this, the book’s structure remains the same as in previous editions, growing where necessary to accommodate explanations of new features, such as autolayout (in Chapter 14), state restoration (in Chapter 19), and collection views (in Chapter 21). Also, in response to reader requests, I have inserted a short example of Core Data programming into Chapter 36.”

Absolute beginners should not start with this book. Get some basic programming experience in C and Objective-C first.

And don’t be surprised that not everything about iOS is covered in a book 1,154 pages long. “It’s far too big to be encompassed in a book even of this size,” Neuburg emphasizes. “There are areas of Cocoa Touch that I have ruthlessly avoided discussing. Some of them would require an entire book of their own. Others you can pick up well enough, when the time comes, from the documentation. This book is only a beginning — the fundamentals.”

Si Dunn

Core Data, 2nd Edition – Updated for OS X Mountain Lion and iOS 6 – #programming #bookreview

Core Data, 2nd Edition
Data Storage and Management for iOS, OS X, and iCloud
Marcus S. Zarra
(Pragmatic Bookshelf – paperback)

“If you plan on writing an application that saves data to disk, then you should take a very long look at Core Data,” urges Marcus S. Zarra, in the new second edition of his Core Data how-to book.

“Core Data,” according to the Mac Developer Library, “provides an infrastructure for change management and for saving objects to and retrieving them from storage.”  It is Apple’s recommended way to persist data. And it is “used daily by millions of customers in a wide variety of applications.”

The new edition of Zarra’s book updates its Core Data development example to an iPhone recipe application (from a desktop recipe application in the first edition). The second edition includes coverage of OS X Mountain Lion and iOS 6 and examines changes to multithreading. The author also has added chapters to explore NSFetchedResultsController and iCloud.

If the structure of some of the book’s code examples appear puzzling, pay special attention to Appendix 2. There, Zarra discusses some of the typographical choices necessary to keep lines of code set to fewer than 80 characters wide. And he shows some macros that he uses in his code to speed up development work.

Whether you are just starting out with Core Data or now an old hand at working with it, you likely can learn new things from this well-written how-to guide. Its author is widely regarded as one of the world’s most experienced Core Data application developers.

Si Dunn

iOS 6 Programming Cookbook – Updated for the new SDK – #iOS #programming #bookreview

iOS 6 Programming Cookbook
Vandad Nahavandipoor
(O’Reilly –
paperback, Kindle)

If you are a new iOS developer, you can learn many things quickly from this hefty book. And even if you are an iOS veteran, you can gain some important new insights.

The iOS 6 cookbook has been completely updated to cover the recently released iOS 6 SDK. And the author is a well-known and well-experienced developer of iOS apps.

The 20-chapter book begins with the basics of programming for the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, using Objective-C. But it is not intended for beginners who are just learning to program.

In some forums, debates continue to rage over whether new programmers who want to create iOS apps should dive straight into learning Objective-C or study traditional C first and perhaps other programming languages before tackling Objective-C.

No opinion is offered in this well-written, well-organized book. It is just assumed that “you are comfortable with the iOS development environment and know how to create an app for the iPhone or iPad.”

The book’s  focus, the author says, is on explaining “frameworks and classes that are available in iOS 6 SDK” and teaching the reader “the latest and greatest APIs. As you know, some users of your apps may still be on older versions of iOS, so please consider those users and choose your APIs wisely, depending on the minimum iOS version that you want to target with your apps.”

Here is the chapter line-up for iOS 6 Programming Cookbook:

  1. The Basics
  2. Implementing Controllers and Views
  3. Auto Layout and the Visual Format Language
  4. Constructing and Using Table Views
  5. Storyboards
  6. Concurrency
  7. Core Location and Maps
  8. Implementing Gesture Recognizers
  9. Networking, JSON, XML, and Twitter
  10. Audio and Video
  11. Address Book
  12. Files and Folder Management
  13. Camera and the Photo Library
  14. Multitasking
  15. Core Data
  16. Dates, Calendars, and Events
  17. Graphics and Animations
  18. Core Motion
  19. iCloud
  20. Pass Kit

Vandad Nahavandipoor’s important new iOS 6 cookbook offers hundreds of how-to examples and code samples that can help solve problems and give well-defined starting points and frameworks for developers at all levels of experience.

The topics and code samples range from the basic, such as testing new iOS apps by running them on the iOS simulator, to the advanced, such as using Apple’s Pass Kit to create digitally signed coupons, tickets or passes that can be delivered to compatible iOS devices running iOS 6 or later.

Si Dunn

iPhone: The Missing Manual, 6th Edition – Covers all iPhone models with iOS 6 software – #bookreview

iPhone: The Missing Manual, 6th Edition
David Pogue
(O’Reilly, paperback, Kindle)

 

This latest “Missing Manual” from David Pogue covers all iPhone models that have iOS 6 software, including iPhone 5.

The 538-page book is well-written, well-organized, and heavily illustrated with color photographs, illustrations, and screen shots. It also has numerous tips set off in yellow boxes for extra emphasis.

The 6th Edition’s chapters are gathered into five parts:

  • The iPhone as Phone – Focuses on “everything related to phone calls” with the iPhone.
  • Pix, Flix & Apps – “[D]edicated to the iPhone’s built-in software programs, with a special emphasis on its multimedia abilities…also app management….”
  • The iPhone Online – Includes “email, Web browsing, and tethering (that is, letting your phone serve as a sort of Internet antenna for your laptop).”
  • Connections – “…the world beyond the iPhone itself—like the copy of iTunes on your Mac or PC that can fill up the iPhone with music, videos, and photos, and syncing the calendar, address book, and mail settings.” Also covers the iPhone’s control panel, the Settings Program, and other features.
  • Appendixes – Appendix A covers the iPhone setup process; Appendix B looks at accessories such as chargers, car adapters, and carrying cases; Appendix C is a “master compendium of troubleshooting, maintenance, and battery information.”

The new iOS 6 software is available free, Pogue says, and is “the same operating system that runs on the iPad and the iPod Touch.”

He adds: “Why is that important? Because you can run iOS 6 on older iPhone models (the 3GS, 4, and 4S) without having to buy a new phone.” His new book “covers all phones that can run the iOS 6 software: the iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, and iPhone 5.”

Si Dunn

For more information: paperback, Kindle