‘The Book Artist’ is Mark Pryor’s eighth Hugo Marston mystery – #bookreview

The Book Artist,” the eighth book in Mark Pryor’s Hugo Marston mystery series, is entertaining, absorbing–and paced a bit slower than some detective/police procedurals. That’s because it offers readers a nice mixture of Paris atmosphere and American diplomats and others living, working and partying in Paris.

The novel’s law-enforcement angles also require some slower pacing. The main character, Hugo Marston, chief of the security for the U.S. Embassy in Paris, must work within a narrow legal framework (that he sometimes oversteps) while interacting with Paris police and other French agencies.

In “The Book Artist,” a sculptor is murdered, and French police arrest an American suspect who has close connections to Hugo. He is convinced she isn’t the killer. But her DNA has been found on the victim’s body, and the Paris police say they have other evidence that can bring a murder conviction.

Marston must unmask the real killer before his American friend disappears into the French legal system’s labyrinth.

The Book Artist

Mark Pryor

Seventh Street Books

#

Advertisements

Dante’s Dilemma – A solid mystery featuring a blind psychiatrist as investigator – #bookreview

 

Dante’s Dilemma

A Mark Angelotti Novel

Lynne Raimondo

Seventh Street Books – paperback, Kindle

Lynne Raimondo puts her legal background and well-honed writing skills solidly to work in Dante’s Dilemma, her third Mark Angelotti novel.

Part of the enjoyment of reading this well-crafted mystery is watching the author stretch to keep Dr. Angelotti, a blind psychiatrist, within the confines of his physical limitations, while he discerns clues by using his mind, his hearing and other senses and paying attention to what others say.

As this story unfolds, Angelotti, an expert in treating post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), has had an affair that has wrecked his marriage and reduced his access to his young son. And, testifying as an expert witness for the prosecution in a Chicago murder case associated with domestic violence, he all but helps convict someone who may — or may not — be the killer.

Soon, a link to another homicide emerges, and it has ties to the case where he has testified. And Angelotti now must risk the real possibility of freezing to death in a bad Chicago winter while he tries to find answers to the key question: Is the real murderer already in custody or still out there and about to get away?

Dante’s Dilemma is entertaining mystery fiction, with an intriguingly flawed main character and plenty of twists. And the book illuminates a troubling real-life issue, as well. Domestic violence, author Lynne Raimondo notes in her acknowledgments, “affects an estimated 1.3 million women and their families in the United States annually.”

Si Dunn

 

Click here to get more information about Dante’s Dilemma

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Button Man – A fast-paced chase to find and stop an obsessed serial killer – #fiction #bookreview

 

The Button Man

A Hugo Marston Prequel

Mark Pryor

(Seventh Street Books – paperback, Kindle)

 

Fans of Mark Pryor’s investigator Hugo Marston will be delighted with this well-written and fast-paced new prequel to The Bookseller, the novel that started the Marston series. Likewise, The Button Man is an excellent place to start reading if you are seeking a new crime fighter to follow through the streets and countrysides of England and France.

The Button Man takes us back to Marston’s troubled early days as chief of security at the U.S. Embassy in London, before he became chief of security at the U.S. Embassy in Paris.

In both cities, Marston has a penchant for going “off the reservation,” so to speak, once he is on a case. Indeed, rather than hang around the embassy grounds, he willingly chases suspects through London, Paris and the English and French countrysides. And, as The Button Man shows, Marston often will ditch protocol, as well as jurisdiction, and risk working alone, free from the bureaucracies of British or French backup, as he moves in for the dangerous showdown.

In The Button Man, the ambassador assigns Marston to protect two well-known Americans while British police investigate them following a highly publicized hit-and-run fatality. But one of the Americans suddenly is found murdered, and the other gives Marston the slip and goes on the run.

When Marston, an ex-FBI profiler, goes after the fugitive, he doesn’t know that his pursuit is about to evolve into something much bigger than he expects. Helped along by secretive young woman with an odd name and by a pheasant-hunting member of the British parliament who’s big on law and order and tight budgets, Marston soon finds himself desperately trying to track down and stop someone different and decidedly more dangerous: an English serial killer who doesn’t agree that the way he murders his victims is a crime.

Si Dunn

Si Dunn’s books include Erwin’s Law and Dark Signals.

 

No Stone Unturned and Styx & Stone – An entertaining, engrossing mystery series – #bookreview

No Stone_cover

No Stone Unturned

An Ellie Stone Mystery

James W. Ziskin

(Seventh Street Books – paperback, Kindle)

***

 Styx & Stone

An Ellie Stone Mystery

James W. Ziskin

(Seventh Street Books – paperback, Kindle)

***

 Looking for a new mystery series and investigator to follow? Check out these two engrossing, entertaining novels from James W. Ziskin and Seventh Street Books.

Set in 1960, Styx & Stone, the series debut, and the recently published No Stone Unturned focus on Ellie Stone, a young reporter and photographer working for a small-town newspaper in Upstate New York. She’s struggling to hang onto her first professional job after graduating from the prestigious Columbia Journalism School.

It is a time well before women’s liberation, so Ellie is fighting both to stay afloat and advance  in a career that is still “a man’s world.” Yet, despite the nerve-wracking challenges and the men who fall over themselves as they try to get her into bed, she is glad to have work that doesn’t simply involve “shorthand and fetching coffee.”

Still, Ellie is tired of writing filler copy. She wants to get her hands on some real stories for a change. But she is competing in a male-dominated business and in a male-dominated town where everyone essentially knows everyone else. Thus, everything she does or says is scrutinized and subject to criticism by someone. And she sometimes has a tough time figuring out who really wants to help her and who is just trying to score enough points to make out with her.

Intrepidly, she pushes ahead. And she has a trait born of bravado and curiosity, as well as desperation to keep her job. She is not afraid to confront people and ask questions that others, including the police, have not thought of–or, more dangerously, have not wished to ask.

In Styx & Stone, Ellie leaves Upstate New York long enough to go back home to New York City after her estranged father, a famous Dante scholar and professor, is savagely beaten. The police think he was attacked by burglars, but Ellie is convinced it was a murder attempt and starts asking questions. Soon, another professor is killed, and a second attempt is made on Ellie’s father’s life. Later, he dies of his injuries.

Ellie is so thorough, demanding and even brazen in her probings that, at one point, Detective-Sergeant Jimmo McKeever of the NYPD, complains:  “Are you planning to solve every crime in New York during your stay?” Yet later, while helping her solve the murders,  he concedes a bit awkwardly: “If you were a man, you’d make a good detective.”

Meanwhile, in No Stone Unturned, Ellie is back in Upstate New York, at her newspaper job in the community of New Holland. She is wanting to prove to her boss and her fellow employes that she is a good journalist.

She intends to write  the main, front-page story about a newly discovered murder. But to beat the newspaper’s veteran (and male) crime reporter to the task, she must also solve the murder–quickly.

That means taking dangerous risks and hurriedly confronting powerful people in the community with sharp questions that create more enemies than friends. Along the way, she also must defend herself from being fired from her job. And she must find the inner courage to stick with her fledgling–though currently floundering–newspaper career.

James W. Ziskin’s Ellie Stone is an engaging, intelligent and ambitious young woman who knows both how to fight crime and how to fight her way through many of the historical, social and economic barriers that again restricted American women’s freedoms after World War II.

Si Dunn