Jump Start Sinatra – With this book and a little Ruby, you can make Sinatra sing – #programming #bookreview

Jump Start Sinatra
Get Up to Speed with Sinatra in a Weekend
Darren Jones
(SitePoint – Kindle, Paperback)

Many Ruby developers love Rails for its power and capabilities as a model-view-controller (MVC) framework. But some of them don’t like Rails’ size, complexity, and learning curve.

Meanwhile, many other Rubyists love Sinatra for its simplicity and ease of learning, plus its ability “to create a fully functional web app in just one file,” says Darren Jones in his new book, Jump Start Sinatra. “There are no complicated setup procedures or configuration to worry about. You can just open up a text editor and get started with minimal effort, leaving you to focus on the needs of your application.”

Jones does not temper his enthusiasm for Sinatra, adding that “there isn’t a single line of bloat anywhere in its source code, which weighs in at fewer than 2,000 lines!”

His 150-page book covers a lot of ground, from downloading and installing Sinatra to building websites, working with SQLite, Heroku, Rack, jQuery, and Git, and even using some CoffeeScript (to avoid “getting our hands dirty writing JavaScript…”). He also shows how to create modular Sinatra applications that use separate classes.

“Sinatra makes it easy–trivial almost–to build sites, services, and web apps using Ruby,” the author states. “A Sinatra application is basically made up of one or more Ruby files. You don’t need to be an expert Rubyist to use Sinatra, but the more Ruby you know, the better you’ll be at building Sinatra apps.”

Jones adds: “Unlike Ruby on Rails, Sinatra is definitely not a framework. It’s without conventions and imposes no file structure on you whatsoever. Sinatra apps are basically just Ruby programs; what Sinatra does is connect them to the Web. Rather than hide behind lots of magic, it exposes the way the Web works by making the key concepts of HTTP verbs and URLs an explicit part of it.”

Jump Start Sinatra is a well-written, appropriately illustrated guide to getting started with this popular free software. Ruby newcomers may wish for a few more how-to steps or code examples. But the counter argument is, if you’re brand-new to Ruby, save Sinatra for later; focus on getting learning Ruby first. 

Darren Jones does not buy into a common assessment that’s often heard when developers are asked their views of Rails vs. Sinatra. “Opinions abound that Sinatra can only be used for small applications or simple APIs, but this simply isn’t true,” he argues. “”While it is a perfect fit for these tasks, Sinatra also scales impressively, demonstrated by the fact that it’s been used to power some big production sites.”

Some of those “big production sites,” according to Wikipedia, include such notables as Apple, LinkedIn, the BBC, the British government, Heroku, and GitHub.

Si Dunn

Build Awesome Command-Line Applications in Ruby – #programming #bookreview

Build Awesome Command-Line Applications in Ruby
David Bryant Copeland
(Pragmatic Bookshelf,
paperback)

The word “awesome” now is grossly overused in contemporary culture. And I hate it in book titles.

That being said, Build Awesome Command-Line Applications in Ruby is an excellent how-to guide, particularly if you have a little bit of UNIX and some basic Ruby programming in your background.

The book is “aimed at both developers and system administrators who have some familiarity with Ruby and who find themselves automating things on the command line (or wish they could),” David Bryant Copeland writes. And he adds: “Writing command-line apps in Ruby is also a great way to really learn Ruby and become a better programmer, since you can apply it directly to your day-to-day tasks.”

Mac and Linux users will have the easiest time with this book’s code examples. Things get a little bit more complicated for Windows users, especially those with no UNIX experience and not much programming background, either. The author, fortunately, lays out some workarounds.

For example, on UNIX systems, the first line of code commonly is called the shebang. In a piece of Ruby code, the shebang might look something like this: #!/usr/bin/ruby. (That example tells where the Ruby interpreter is installed.) But, at a Windows command prompt, if Ruby has been installed correctly and is in the path, the # character simply will be interpreted as the start of a comment line, and the rest of the shebang will be ignored when code is run directly, such as: ruby hello_world.rb.

In this book, David Bryant Copeland’s focus definitely is code. “There is a lot of code,” he says, “and we’ll do our best to take each new bit of it step by step.” As the book progresses, two command-line applications are developed, enhanced, and improved. One is a database-backup app, and the other is a command suite, “an app that provides a set of commands, each representing a different function of a related concept.”

This is not a Ruby primer, so get some experience in that language first before tackling this book. But if you are now reasonably comfortable with Ruby coding on a graphical user interface (GUI) and want some new challenges, consider moving to the command line and use this excellent book as your guide.

The requirements are minimal: a free Ruby download and a text editor or a UNIX-like shell. But the payoff is very good.

In his 10 chapters, the author discusses and illustrates “every detail of command-line application development, from user input, program output, and code organization to code handling, testing, and distribution” while the two example applications are created, tested, and enhanced.

There is plenty to learn, and Build Awesome Command-Line Applications in Ruby does a fine job of  leading you through the process in short-chapter steps.

Si Dunn