jQUERY UI IN ACTION: A smooth guide to getting, learning and using plugins supported by the jQuery Foundation – #bookreview

jQuery UI in Action

TJ VanToll

 (Manning – paperback)

 

TJ VanToll had two straightforward goals in mind when he decided to write this nicely prepared book: “I wanted to write about how to use the jQuery UI components in real-world usage scenarios and applications. I also wanted to tackle the tough questions for jQuery UI users. [Such as] Why should you use the jQuery UI datepicker instead of the native date picker included in HTML5? How do you use jQuery UI on mobile devices, especially in low bandwidth situations?”

According to the jQuery Foundation, “jQuery is a fast, small, and feature-rich JavaScript library. It makes things like HTML document traversal and manipulation, event handling, animation, and Ajax much simpler with an easy-to-use API that works across a multitude of browsers. With a combination of versatility and extensibility, jQuery has changed the way that millions of people write JavaScript.”

The problem with popularity, of course, is that jQuery became widely employed soon after it was introduced in 2006. Users quickly created a flood of jQuery plugins that, Van Toll writes, “had inconsistent APIs, and often had little or no documentation. Because of these problems, the jQuery team wanted to provide an official set of plugins in a centralized location. In September 2007 they created a new library with these plugins—jQuery UI.”

He adds: “From a high level, jQuery UI was, and still is, a collection of plugins and utilities that build on jQuery. But dig deeper and you find a set of consistent, well-documented, themeable building blocks to help you create everything from small websites to highly complex web applications. Unlike jQuery plugins, the plugins and utilities in jQuery UI are supported by the jQuery Foundation. You can count on them to be officially supported and maintained throughout the life of your application.”

Well-written and well-illustrated, jQuery UI in Action reflects VanToll’s knowledge and experience as a professional web developer and member of the core jQuery UI team.

The book is structured into three parts, encompassing 12 chapters. And it assumes readers have at least basic experience with JavaScript, CSS, and jQuery.

Part One’s chapters introduce jQuery UI and “the ins and outs of widgets…the core building blocks of jQuery UI.”

Part Two’s chapters offer “a comprehensive look at the components of jQuery UI: twelve jQuery UI widgets (chapters 3–4), five jQuery
UI interactions (chapter 5), numerous jQuery UI effects (chapter 6), and the jQuery UI CSS framework (chapter 7).” VanToll explains how each component works and shows how to apply the knowledge to real-world applications. The example projects include: building complex webforms with jQueryUI; using layout and utility widgets; adding interaction to interfaces; and using built-in and customized themes to provide “a consistent look to all widgets.”

Part Three focuses on “Customization and advanced usage.” Here, VanToll explores such topics as using the widget factory to create custom widgets, preparing applications for production, and building a flight-search application “at real-world scale.” In the final chapter, he takes us under jQuery’s hood “to dig into a series of utilities, methods, and properties intended for more advanced usage of the library.”

If you work with jQuery or are ready to start using it, take a good look at jQuery UI, as well. As this book promises, “You’re only one tag away from richer user interfaces….” That tag is pretty simple: <script src=”jquery-ui.js”> — but a lot can happen once you include it.

TJ VanToll’s new book should be your go-to guide for getting, learning and putting jQuery UI into action.

Si Dunn

 

 

 

 

 

http://amzn.to/1r1VwUI

 

You’ll master jQuery UI’s five main interactions—draggable, droppable, resizable, selectable, and sortable—and learn UI techniques that work across all devices.

HADOOP IN PRACTICE, 2nd Edition – An updated guide to handling some of the ‘trickier and dirtier aspects of Hadoop’ – #programming #bookreview

 

Hadoop in Practice, Second Edition

Alex Holmes

(Manning – paperback )

 

The Hadoop world has undergone some big changes lately, and this hefty, updated edition offers excellent coverage of a lot of what’s new. If you currently work with Hadoop and MapReduce or are planning to take them up soon, give serious consideration to adding this well-written book to your technical library. A key feature of the book is its “104 techniques.” These show how to accomplish practical and important tasks when working with Hadoop, MapReduce and their growing array of software “friends.”

The author, Alex Holmes, has been working with Hadoop for more than six years and is a software engineer, author, speaker, and blogger specializing in large-scale Hadoop projects.

His new second edition, he writes, “covers Hadoop 2, which at the time of writing is the current production-ready version of Hadoop. The first edition of the book covered Hadoop 0.22 (Hadoop 1 wasn’t yet out), and Hadoop 2 has turned the world upside-down and opened up the Hadoop platform to processing paradigms beyond MapReduce. YARN, the new scheduler and application manager in Hadoop 2, is complex and new to the community, which prompted me to dedicate a new chapter 2 to covering YARN basics and to discussing how MapReduce now functions as a YARN application.”

In the book, Holmes notes that “Parquet has also recently emerged as a new way to store data in HDFS—its columnar format can yield both space and time efficiencies in your data pipelines, and it’s quickly becoming the ubiquitous way to store data. Chapter 4 includes extensive coverage of Parquet, which includes how Parquet supports sophisticated object models such as Avro and how various Hadoop tools can use Parquet.”

Furthermore, “[h]ow data is being ingested into Hadoop has also evolved since the first edition,” Holmes points out, “and Kafka has emerged as the new data pipeline, which serves as the transport tier between your data producers and data consumers, where a consumer would be a system
such as Camus that can pull data from Kafka into HDFS. Chapter 5, which covers moving data into and out of Hadoop, now includes coverage of Kafka and Camus.”  [Reviewer’s note: Interesting software names here. Franz Kafka and Alfred Camus were writers deeply concerned about finding clarity and meaning in a world that seemed to offer none.]

Holmes adds that “[t]here are many new technologies that YARN now can support side by side in the same cluster, and some of the more exciting and promising technologies are covered in the new part 4, titled ‘Beyond MapReduce,’ where I cover some compelling new SQL technologies such as Impala and Spark SQL. The last chapter, also new for this edition, looks at how you can write your own YARN application, and it’s packed with information about important features to support your YARN application.”

Hadoop and MapReduce have gained reputations (well-earned) for being difficult to set up, use and master. In his new edition, Holmes describes his own early experiences: “The greatest challenge we faced when working with Hadoop, and specifically MapReduce, was relearning how to solve problems with it. MapReduce is its own flavor of parallel programming, and it’s quite different from the in-JVM programming that we were accustomed to. The first big hurdle was training our brains to think MapReduce, a topic which the book Hadoop in Action by Chuck Lam (Manning Publications, 2010) covers well.”

(These days, of course, there are both open source and commercial releases of Hadoop, as well as quickstart virtual machine versions that are good for learning Hadoop.)

Holmes continues: “After one is used to thinking in MapReduce, the next challenge is typically related to the logistics of working with Hadoop, such as how to move data in and out of HDFS and effective and efficient ways to work with data in Hadoop. These areas of Hadoop haven’t received much coverage, and that’s what attracted me to the potential of this book—the chance to go beyond the fundamental word-count Hadoop uses and covering some of the trickier and dirtier aspects of Hadoop.”

If you have difficulty explaining Hadoop to others (such as a manager or executive hesitant to let it be implemented), Holmes offers a succint summation in his updated book:

“Doug Cutting, the creator of Hadoop, likes to call Hadoop the kernel for big data, and I would tend to agree. With its distributed storage and compute capabilities, Hadoop is fundamentally an enabling technology for working with huge datasets. Hadoop provides a bridge between structured (RDBMS) and unstructured (log files, XML, text) data and allows these datasets to be easily joined together.”

One book cannot possibly cover everything you need to know about Hadoop, MapReduce, Parquet, Kafka, Camus, YARN and other technologies. And this book and its software examples assume that you have some experience with Java, XML and JSON. Yet Hadoop in Practice, Second Edition gives a very good and reasonably deep overview, spanning such major categories as background and fundamentals, data logistics, Big Data patterns, and moving beyond MapReduce.

Si Dunn

 

 

Advanced Software Testing, Vol. 2, 2nd Edition – Study guide for ISTQB Advanced Test Manager – #bookreview

Advanced Software Testing, Volume 2, 2nd Edition

Guide to the ISTQB Advanced Certification as an Advanced Test Manager

Rex Black

(Rocky Nook – paperback)

 

Software testing is a complex and constantly evolving field. And having some well-recognized certifications is a good way to help encourage  your continued employability as a software tester and manager of software test teams.

Advanced Software Testing, Volume 2, 2nd Edition, focuses on showing you how to obtain an International Software Testing Qualifications Board (ISTQB) certification as an advanced test manager. The 519-page book is well-written and lays out what test managers should know to gain advanced skills in test estimation, test planning, test monitoring, and test control.

It also emphasizes  knowing how to define overall testing goals and strategies for the systems you and your team are testing. And it gives you strategies for preparing for and passing the 65-question Advanced Test Manager qualification test that is administered by ISTQB member boards and exam providers.

This second edition has been updated to reflect the ISTQB’s Advanced Test Manager 2012 Syllabus.  Advanced Software Testing, Volume 2, 2nd Edition takes a hands-on, exercise-rich approach, and it provides experience with essential how-tos for planning, scheduling, and tracking important tasks.

The updated book focuses on a variety of key processes that a software test manager must be able to handle, including describing and organizing the activities necessary to select, find and assign the right number of resources for testing tasks. You also must learn how to organize and lead testing teams, and how to manage the communications among testing teams’ members and between testing teams and all the other stakeholders. And you will need to know how to justify your testing decisions and report necessary information both to your superiors and members of your teams.

As for taking the complicated qualifications test, the author urges: “Don’t panic! Remember, the exam is meant to test your achievement of the learning objectives in the Advanced  Test Manager syllabus.” In other words, you cannot simply skim this book and take the exam. You must spend significant time on the learning exercises, sample questions and ISTQB glossary.

Si Dunn

***

Get the book here: Advanced Software Testing, Volume 2, 2nd Edition

***

Photoshop CC and Lightroom – An elegant, well-focused how-to handbook from Rocky Nook – #photography #bookreview

 

Photoshop CC and Lightroom

A Photographer’s Handbook

Stephen Laskevitch

(Rocky Nook – paperback, Kindle)

 

Stephen Laskevitch’s Photoshop CC and Lightroom is an excellent how-to book that both instructs and inspires.

This elegant new how-to book from Rocky Nook is aimed at digital photographers and graphics designers “who want to learn the basic tools and image editing steps within Photoshop and Lightroom to recreate professional looking images.” However, the book also is recommended for “a wide range of technicians and office workers who simply want to do more effective image editing.”

As a sometimes-photographer and not-frequent-enough user of feature-rich Photoshop, I definitely need how-to books like this to keep me on track with the features that I “know,” while also reminding me that there are many useful features I have not yet tried or learned. Fortunately, Laskevitch, an Adobe Certified Instructor, deliberately avoids the common tendency to showcase just the  “wow-factor Photoshop techniques.” Instead, he emphasizes “all the key techniques for good image editing: using layers and layer blending, color correction, printer profiles, and more.”

His book is richly illustrated with photographs that can inspire you to pick up your camera and go shoot. And it has plenty of how-to illustrations and steps for using the 2014 release of Photoshop CC, plus its companions: Bridge, Camera Raw, and Lightroom 5, as you process, enhance and preserve your images.

Bridge is a tool that lets you examine, sort, rate and organize the images in a folder. Adobe Camera Raw provides a few settings that can be selected or adjusted, and Laskevitch recommends shooting in RAW format, unless shooting snapshots. “One of the biggst advantages of RAW files,” he emphasizes, “is that they have more than 8 bits per channel of information and can therefore be edited more than JPEG files.” Lightroom, meanwhile, is “a photographer-friendly database application” that helps you keep track of your images and where you have stored them.

Photoshop CC and Lightroom is divided into two parts and ten chapters:

The Setup

  • Important Terms & Concepts
  • System Configuration
  • The Interface: A Hands-On Tour

The Workflow

  • Capture & Import
  • Organizing & Archiving Images
  • Global Adjustments
  • Local Adjustments
  • Cleaning & Retouching
  • Creative Edits & Alternatives
  • Output

“Output,” Laskevitch notes, “is the creation of what I call deliverables, whether that is a print, a book, a web site, or a digital file. Printing should be easier than it is, especially after all of these years of digital imaging. Improved with each release of Photoshop, the method I outline is simpler than ever. But since it uses profiles tht describe your printer’s characteristics to achineve stunning consistency and optimal results, you’ll have to keep focused nonetheless. This method,” he explains,” can also allaow you to experiment with many more papers than your printer manufacturer supplies.”

You do not have to have any prior Photoshop experience to benefit from Photoshop CC and Lightroom: A Photographer’s Handbook. And Photoshop works with either Windows or Mac computers, the author points out. Also, many (but not all) of the worfklows and techniques he describes can be used with previous versions of the software products, as well.

Si Dunn

  

Java 8 in Action – Ready for lambdas, streams and functional-style programming? #bookreview

 

Java 8 in Action

Lambdas, streams, and functional-style programming

Raoul-Gabriel Urma, Mario Fusco, Alan Mycroft

(Manning – paperback)

 Java 8, we were sometimes assured, would just be Java 7 with a few slick new (or past-due) features added.

Actually, now that it’s here, Java 8 represents “the biggest change to Java in the 18 years since Java 1.0 was released,” the three authors of this fine new book point out.

Of course, news of “big changes” seldom sits well with developers who have spent countless hours learning and getting comfortable with one particular version of a programming language.

And many coders and companies will continue sticking with Java 7 for a while longer, because it still works. But the adoption pace for Java 8 keeps picking up. So, to misquote an old sci-fi slogan, resistance soon will become somewhat futile.

Lambdas, streams, and functional-style programming capabilities are Java 8’s headline additions. And there are some other major and minor additions, as well, including default methods and a new Date and Time API.

Java 8 in Action does an excellent job of introducing these new capabilities, and the book offers many short code examples and other illustrations to show how to put the new Java 8 capabilities to work.

Indeed, short (and shorter!) code is one of the hallmarks of Java 8. “In Java 8 you can write more concise code that reads a lot closer to the problem statement,” the writers emphasize. To illustrate that point, they offer a five-line example of verbose Java 7 code and follow it with a one-line Java 8 code example that accomplishes the same thing. Other examples also drive home the coding efficiencies that Java 8 can offer.

Lambdas, also known as anonymous functions, enable you to skip writing method definitions that will only be used once. The authors note that “passing code is currently tedious and verbose in Java [meaning 7 and earlier]. Well, good news! Lambdas fix this problem: they let you pass code in a concise way. Lambdas technically don’t let you do anything you couldn’t do prior to Java 8. But you no longer have to write clumsy code using anonymous classes to benefit from behavior parameterization!”

The new Streams API makes it much easier to work with collections in Java and provides “a much different way to process data in comparison to the Collections API.” Using the Streams API, “you don’t need to think in terms of loops at all. The data processing happens internally inside the library.”

Meanwhile, if you are a diehard object-oriented programmer, you may be leery of the term “functional programming” and the notion of using functions as values. (“In practice, you can’t completely program in pure functional style in Java,” the authors note. Instead, you will learn how to write “functional-style programs” in which you hide the side effects.)

With Java 8, “two core ideas from functional programming…are now part of Java: using methods and lambdas as first-class values, and the idea that calls to functions or methods can be efficiently and safely executed in parallel in the absence of mutable shared state. Both of these ideas are exploited by the new Streams API,” the writers state.  Also, in Java 8, they add, “there’s an Optional class that, if used consistently can help you avoid NullPointer exceptions.”

This review barely dents the surface of this excellent how-to book’s contents. Whether you are learning Java now or you are a Java developer who wants to keep your coding skills up-to-date and sharp, Java 8 in Action should be a book you will read soon.

Si Dunn

Cloudera Administration Handbook – How to become an effective Big Data administrator of large Hadoop clusters – #bookreview

 

 

Cloudera Administration Handbook

 Rohit Menon

Packt PublishingKindle, paperback

 

The explosive growth and use of Big Data in business, government, science and other arenas has fueled a strong demand for new Hadoop administrators. The administrators’ key duty is to set up and maintain Hadoop clusters that help process and analyze massive amounts of information.

New Hadoop administrators and those looking to join their ranks especially will want to give good consideration to The Cloudera Administration Handbook by Rohit Menon. This is a well-organized, well-written and solidly illustrated guide to building and maintaining large Apache Hadoop clusters using Cloudera Manager and CDH5.

The author has an extensive computer science background and is a Cloudera Certified Apache Hadoop Developer. He notes that “Cloudera Inc., is a Palo Alto-based American enterprise software company that provides Apache Hadoop-based software, support and services, and training to data-driven enterprises. It is often referred to as the commercial Hadoop company.”

CDH, Menon points out, is the easy shorthand name for a rather awkward software title: “Cloudera’s Distribution Including Apache Hadoop.” CDH is “an enterprise-level distribution including Apache Hadoop and several components of its ecosystem such as Apache Hive, Apache Avro, HBase, and many more. CDH is 100 percent open source,” Menon writes.

The Cloudera Manager, meanwhile, “is a web-browser-based administration tool to manage Apache Hadoop clusters. It is the centralized command center to operate the entire cluster from a single interface. Using Cloudera Manager, the administrator gets visibility for each and every component in the cluster.”

The Cloudera Manager is not explored until nearly halfway into the book, and some may wish it had been explained sooner, since they may be trying to learn it on day one of their new job. However, Menon wants readers first to become familiar with “all the steps and operations needed to set up a cluster via the command line” at a terminal. And these are, of course, important considerations to becoming an effective, knowledgeable and versatile Hadoop Administrator.  (You may not always have access to Cloudera Manager while setting up or troubleshooting a cluster.)

The book’s nine chapters show its well-focused range:

  • Chapter 1: Getting Started with Apache Hadoop
  • Chapter 2: HDFS and MapReduce
  • Chapter 3: Cloudera’s Distribution Including Apache Hadoop
  • Chapter 4: Exploring HDFS Federation and Its High Availability
  • Chapter 5: Using Cloudera Manager
  • Chapter 6: Implementing Security Using Kerberos
  • Chapter 7: Managing an Apache Hadoop Cluster
  • Chapter 8: Cluster Monitoring Using Events and Alerts
  • Chapter 9: Configuring Backups

You will have to bring some hardware and software experience and skills to the table, of course. Apache Hadoop primarily is run on Linux. “So having good Linux skills such as monitoring, troubleshooting, configuration, and security is a must” for a Hadoop administrator, Menon points out. Another requirement is being able to work comfortably with the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) and understand Java exceptions.

But those skills and his Cloudera Administration Handbook can take you from “the very basics of Hadoop” to taking up “the responsibilities of a Hadoop administrator and…managing huge Hadoop clusters.”

Si Dunn

Help support the work of reviewing books. Click here to buy the book:  Kindle, paperback

The Well-Grounded Rubyist, 2nd Edition – A solid, well-written, updated guide to the Ruby programming language – #bookreview

 

black3_cover150

The Well-Grounded Rubyist

David A. Black

(Manning – paperback)

Ruby, predominately known as an object-oriented programming language, shows up frequently on lists of the top ten (or whatever) languages to know. And Ruby has long been paired with Rails to create the popular Ruby on Rails web application framework.

When the forerunner of this book appeared eight years ago, it was titled Ruby for Rails: Ruby Techniques for Rails Developers. And R4R, as it is sometimes known, was well received in both the Ruby and Rails camps.

In 2009, the R4R book was revised and retitled The Well-Grounded Rubyist. “This new edition is  a descendant of R4R but not exactly an update. It’s more of a repurposing,” the author, David A. Black, noted at the time. “The Well-Grounded Rubyist is a ‘just Ruby’ book, and it’s written to be read by anyone interested in Ruby.”

That focus continues in this second edition, which has been updated to cover Ruby 2.1. Ruby newcomers can get started and advance quickly with this fine “just Ruby” book in hand. Ruby veterans also can use it to gain new knowledge and sharpen familiar skills.

Black approaches the process of explaining Ruby “as a kind of widening spiral, building on the familiar but always opening out into the unknown.”

His well-written text does not try to be a “complete” language reference. Instead, reading The Well-Grounded Rubyist is like having a well-experienced and patient mentor close at hand–a mentor who willingly offers up clear examples and explanations. You likely will want to keep this book around as a go-to how-to reference long after you have learned and begun to work with Ruby.

It does help to have at least a little experience with programming before you tackle Ruby and this book. And, if you already have an older version of Ruby installed on your computer, upgrade it to 2.1.x. (As this review is being written, 2.1.2 is the current version.)

Yes, Ruby can be used in several different programming paradigms, including functional and imperative. But The Well-Grounded Rubyist is essentially all-object-oriented-all-the-time in its approach.

“Ruby is an object-oriented language, and the sooner you dive into how Ruby handles objects, the better,” Black states. “Accordingly, objects will serve both as a way to bootstrap the discussion of the language (and your knowledge of it) and as a golden thread leading us to further topics and techniques.”

Si Dunn

Grails in Action, 2nd Edition – A (mostly) winning how-to guide to use with a winning web app framework – #programming #bookreview

 

Grails in Action, Second Edition

Glen Smith and Peter Ledbrook

(Manning – paperback)

Grails finishes at or very near the top in almost any smackdown of full-stack web application frameworks that run on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). And this recently updated Grails in Action how-to book is mostly a clear winner, too.

According to the Grails.org website, open-source Grails “takes advantage of the Groovy programming language and convention over configuration to provide a productive and streamlined development experience.”

Grails likewise is a world that “moves very quickly,” the authors of Grails in Action, Second Edition emphasize. “There have been substantial changes in Grails in the time it took us to develop Grails in Action, Second Edition. Even moving from Grails 2.2 to 2.3 caused us to make significant changes! Although the book targets Grails 2.3, a new version of Grails (2.4) is already available. Fortunately, everything in here is still valid for the new version.”

In the first chapter, the authors try to move very quickly through the process of getting a Grails application up, running, tested and deployed. But in taking this “Grails in a hurry” approach, they race a bit too quickly and unclearly through the installation instructions, in my opinion. (My Linux and Windows installations did not work correctly at first, and I had to seek out  information on how to sort them out.)

And, in the portion of the chapter where you are told how to get the random-quote database set up and working, it is not always clear which file you are supposed to modify and in which subdirectory. I already had a little bit of experience with Groovy, so that portion went smoothly. But the Grails database steps could have been explained and illustrated more clearly. It took me several tries to finally get the “Quote of the Day” database working and posting random quotes.

The authors take a four-part approach to explaining Grails and its underlying Groovy programming language:

  • Part 1: Introducing Grails – You are shown how to get a nicely formatted Quote of the Day (QOTD) application up and running, while also learning how to work with Groovy.
  • Part 2: Core Grails – You get a “more thorough exploration of the three core parts of the Grails ecosystem: models,
    controllers, and views.” Includes such topics as: domain modeling; query mechanisms; how to query a database in Grails without using SQL; Grails’ web-oriented features; Grails Service objects; Grails’ tags for user interface construction; and Grails support for Ajax.
  • Part 3: Everyday Grails – The focus here is on “building all the necessary pieces of a real-world application.” The chapters cover tests, plug-ins, security in Grails and working with RESTful APIs. The chapters also cover (1) Grails single-page web apps using the Angular.js framework, and (2) Spring integration in Grails.
  • Part 4: Advanced Grails – These chapters zero in on “performance tuning, legacy integration, database transactions, custom build processes, and even how to develop and publish your own plugins.”

Aside from a few small omissions of how-to information, I am happy to have the wide-ranging contents of this book. And I am certainly pleased with what I can now do with Grails and Groovy, after reading Grails in Action, Second Edition.

 —Si Dunn

 

 

Node.js Blueprints – A good how-to book that covers plenty of JS frameworks and tools – #programming #bookreview

7338OS_Node.js Blueprints (1)

 

Node.js Blueprints

Develop stunning web and desktop applications with the definitive Node.js

Krasimir Tsonev

(Packt Publishing paperback, Kindle)

 

Krasimir Tsonev’s new Node.js Blueprints book has proven helpful for me as I try to become more adept at using Node.js and a few of the many software packages that can work with it, such as AngularJS, Backbone.js, Ember.js, ExpressJS, Grunt.js and Gulp.js.

If you’ve never used Node.js before, here is its official description from the Nodejs.org site operated by Joyent, Inc.:

“Node.js is a platform built on Chrome’s JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications. Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.”

The focus of Node.js Blueprints is on showing readers the basics of how to use various frameworks, libraries and tools that can help them develop real-world applications that run with Node.js.

Tsonev’s approach is to introduce several popular frameworks, libraries and tools, provide code examples and explain the roles of various sections or modules within the code. The goal in each chapter is to help the reader learn how to work with a framework or other package and create a simple application — a blueprint for something bigger — that can run with Node.js

The book is aimed at intermediate-level JavaScript developers, especially “web developer[s] with experience in writing client-side JavaScript,” who are interested in using Node.js in web and desktop applications.

The 12-chapter, 268-page book is structured as follows:

  • Chapter 1, Common Programming Paradigms, focuses on how “common design patterns known in JavaScript” can be applied in Node.js, as well.
  • Chapter 2, Developing a Basic Site with Node.js and Express, shows how to use ExpressJS, “one of the top frameworks on the market,” in applications “using the built-in Express modules and…your own modules.”
  • Chapter 3, Writing a Blog Application with Node.js and AngularJS, explains how to use the Angular frontend framework with Node.js, MongoDB and MySQL to create “a dynamic application that works with real databases.”
  • Chapter 4, Developing a Chat with Socket.IO, points out that “every big web app uses real-time data” and how it is “important to show instant results to the users.” And it covers “the creation of a simple real-time chat,” while emphasizing that “[t]he same concept can be used to create an automatically updatable HTML component.”
  • Chapter 5, Creating a To-do Application with Backbone.js, notes that “Backbone.js was one of the first frameworks that introduced data binding at the frontend of applications.” A simple (but useful) to-do application is used to illustrate how to use the powerful framework along with Node.js.
  • Chapter 6, Using Node.js as a Command-line Tool, explains that many command-line tools have been written with Node.js, and this chapter shows how to create one. The result is “a simple application which grabs all the images in a directory and uploads them to Flickr.”
  • Chapter 7, Showing a Social Feed with Ember.js, is centered on producing “an Ember.js example that will read a Twitter feed and display the latest posts. That’s actually a common task of every developer,” Tsonev says, “because a lot of applications need to visualize social activity.” (Reviewer’s caution: Ember.js has a long learning curve, and this chapter just barely gets you started.)
  • Chapter 8,  Developing Web App Workflow with Grunt and Gulp, explains how to use two popular task runners. “Grunt is the de facto standard” for simplifying and managing tasks such as concatenation, minification, templating and other operations before an application is delivered to users. Gulp, meanwhile, is a popular build system. The projects in this chapter include generating a cache manifest file using Grunt, and concatenating and minifying using Gulp.
  • Chapter 9, Automating Your Testing with Node.js, is especially aimed at fans (and forced-by-employer “enthusiasts”) of test-driven development and behavior-driven development. The chapter introduces how to use the Node.js versiosn of the Jasmine and Mocha frameworks for testing JavaScript code and how to use the headless browser PhantomJS to test user interfaces. You also are shown how to use DalekJS, a Node.js module that allows you to control major browsers such as Google Chrome, Internet Explorer and Firefox while doing interface tests.
  • Chapter 10, Writing Flexible and Modular CSS, emphasizes how “[t]he Web is built on the basis of three languages–HTML, CSS, and JavaScript” and “Node.js provides really helpful instruments to write CSS…and improve our style sheets.” Other topics include the Less preprocessor, the Stylus preprocessor, the Sass preprocessor, and the AbsurdJS preprocessor.
  • Chapter 11, Writing a REST API, focuses on building a Representational State Transfer (REST) Application Programming Interface (API). The chapter’s Node.js project is “an API of a simple online books library. The resources are the books, and they will be accessed through the REST API.” Tsonev notes that “Node.js is very often used to build REST APIs. Also, because it is a common tool, we have several possible approaches.” In this chapter, however, the emphasis is “to build our REST API from scratch, because it will be more interesting and challenging.”
  • Chapter 12, Developing Desktop Apps with Node.js, declares that “Node.js can be used to produce desktop programs, and w don’t have to learn a new language or use a new tool.” In this chapter, Tsonev shows how to use node-webkit to create a file browser that runs as a desktop program, reads files from the hard drive, displays the files on-screen, and also displays images.

Tsonev’s well-written book introduces a lot of good material to help you get started. After that, you have to do the work to get better at using the various frameworks and tools. But the writer gives you plenty of possibilities to start with in your quest to become a better developer.

You may encounter an occasional typo in the book’s printed code. Thus, be sure to download the available code examples for reference, even if you prefer to type in code by hand (one of my favorite ways to learn, too).

And, during the lengthy process to write, edit, and publish the book, some of the software has changed to newer versions than are called for in the text–which may affect how something works in certain small areas of code.  Indeed, in programming books that rely on several different software packages, changes always happen, and those changes seldom are convenient to the printing deadline.

So if something doesn’t work the way you expect, and you are positive your hand-typed code has no known mistakes, don’t yell at the author. Download the code examples. Look for the publisher’s errata files. Seek out comments at book sites such as the readers’ reviews on Amazon, as well as comments on social media sites and specialized sites where JavaScript and Node.js developers hang out. Also take a look at the “official” websites for the frameworks and tools.

I have been wanting to learn more about working with Node.js, and Node.js Blueprints definitely is filling that need.

Si Dunn

Scala for Java Developers – A practical guide to building apps and integrating code – #programming #bookreview

Scala for Java Developers

Build reactive, scalable applications and integrate Java code with the power of Scala

Thomas Alexandre

(Packtpaperback, Kindle)

 

The increasingly popular Scala programming language runs on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). And “Java and Scala stacks can be freely mixed for totally seamless integration,” Scala’s website proudly trumpets.

The Scala site goes on to note: “Scala is a modern multi-paradigm programming language designed to express common programming patterns in a concise, elegant, and type-safe way. It smoothly integrates features of object-oriented and functional languages.”

Indeed, in Scala, “every value is an object” and “every function is a value.”

Scala’s continuing  rise poses something of a dilemma for many Java developers. Their questions include:

  • Should I learn Scala and blend it with Java?
  • Should I take up Scala and use it instead of  Java?
  • Should I just keep my head down, ignore Scala, and focus on getting better at developing with Java?

Thomas Alexandre’s well-written new book, Scala for Java Developers, clearly is aimed at those who would much rather add Scala to their skills and resumes than attempt to hide from the changes Scala can offer to Java development.

He notes in his preface: “When I tell people around me that I now program in Scala rather than Java, I often get the question, ‘So, in simple words, what is the main advantage of using Scala compared to Java?’  I tend to respond with this: ‘With Scala, you reason and program closer to the domain, closer to plain English.’ “

However, Alexandre’s new how-to guide does not try to browbeat developers into abandoning Java and pledging allegiance to Scala alone. Instead, Alexandre shows how the two programming languages can be used together. And he demonstrates how Scala solutions often can be shorter and less complex than their Java equivalents.

He focuses on “exploring progressively some of the new concepts brought by Scala, in particular, how to unify the best of Object-Oriented and functional programming without giving away any of the established and mature technologies built around Java for the past fifteen years.”

Decisions regarding how far to go with Scala remain with the reader. Yet Alexandre and his numerous code examples make a compelling case for becoming at least reasonably familiar with the language and experiencing how easily it can integrate with Java.

And, yes, he does evangelize a bit; this is, after all, a book about Scala. “Scala is the only language that has it all,” Alexandre touts. “It is statically typed, runs on the JVM and is totally Java compatible, is both object-oriented and functional, and is
not verbose, thereby leading to better productivity, less maintenance, and therefore more fun.”

His book is divided into 10 chapters:

  • Chapter 1: Programming Interactively within Your Project – Includes advantages of using Scala, learning Scala via the REPL, and performing operations on collections.
  • Chapter 2: Code Integration – Focuses on creating a REST API from an existing database, adding a test in Scala, setting up Scala within a Java Maven project, and showing how Scala and Java work together despite some differences in code style.
  • Chapter 3: Understanding the Scala Ecosystem – Includes inheriting Java Integrated Development Environments (IDEs), building with Simple Build Tool (SBT), using Scala worksheets, working with HTTP, and using Typesafe Activator.
  • Chapter 4: Testing Tools – Writing tests with ScalaTest and testing with ScalaCheck.
  • Chapter 5: Getting Started with the Play Framework – Getting started with the classic Play distribution, getting started with the Typesafe Activator, the architecture of a Play application, authentication, and practical tips when using Play.
  • Chapter 6: Database Access and the Future of ORM – In this case, ORM is Object Relational Modeling. Chapter topics include integrating an existing ORM – Hibernate and JPA, dealing with persistence in the Play framework, replacing ORM, learning about Slick, and scaffolding a Play application.
  • Chapter 7: Working with Integration and Web Services – Includes binding XML data in Scala, working with XML and JSON, and handling Play requests with XML and JSON.
  • Chapter 8: Essential Properties of Modern Applications – Asynchrony and Concurrency – Covers the pillars of concurrency, the async library – SIP-22-Async, and getting started with Akka.
  • Chapter 9: Building Reactive Web Applications – Includes describing reactive applications, handling streams reactively, experimenting with WebSockets and Iteratees in Play, learning from activator templates, and playing with Actor Room.
  • Chapter 10: Scala Goodies – Covers exploring MongoDb and scratching the surface of Big Data. Also introduces DSLs in Scala and introduces Scala.js, which compiles Scala to JavaScript.

Alexandre makes a strong pitch for using the Play framework in Scala web development. And he again speaks out for Scala at the conclusion of his well-structured book:

“The concise and expressive syntax of the Scala language should make your code not only more readable but also more maintainable for yourself and other developers,” he writes. “You don’t have to give up any of the libraries of the very large and mature Java ecosystem as all the APIs can be reused directly within Scala. Moreover, you benefit from many additional great Scala-specific libraries. Our recommendation is to take a piece of Java code from a domain you understand well, maybe because you wrote it in the first place one or several times before. Then, try to convert it to Scala code and refactor it to get rid of the boilerplate and to make it in a more functional style.”

Si Dunn